Senate Dems, Sanders ask Trump to help lower drug prices

Senate Democrats are urging Donald TrumpDonald TrumpTrump vows 'No more money for RINOS,' instead encouraging donations to his PAC Federal judge rules 'QAnon shaman' too dangerous to be released from jail Pelosi says Capitol riot was one of the most difficult moments of her career MORE to work with Congress to help lower drug prices. 

Fifteen Democratic senators, as well as Independent Sens. Angus KingAngus KingProgressives' majority delusions politically costly Senate approves sweeping coronavirus measure in partisan vote The eight Democrats who voted 'no' on minimum wage MORE (Maine) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders urges support for Newsom amid recall effort This week: Congress set to send .9 trillion coronavirus bill to Biden Lawmakers, activists remember civil rights icons to mark 'Bloody Sunday' MORE (Vt.), sent a letter to the president-elect on Tuesday arguing he should follow up on his campaign pledge to try to bring down the cost of prescription drugs. 

"You now have the authority to push for a future that prioritizes patients," the senators wrote in the letter. "We are ready to advance measures to achieve this goal and we urge you to partner with Republicans and Democrats alike to take meaningful steps to address the high cost of prescription drugs through bold administrative and legislative actions."

The Democrats add in the letter—which was spearheaded by Sens. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownSchumer insists Democrats unified after chaotic coronavirus debate Mandel gets Club for Growth nod in Ohio Senate primary Bipartisan bill would ban lawmakers from buying, selling stocks MORE (Ohio) and Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate Dems face unity test; Tanden nomination falls Gillibrand: Cuomo allegations 'completely unacceptable' Schumer: Allegations against Cuomo 'serious, very troubling' MORE (Minn.)—that Americans are struggling to afford medication and frequently have to "choose between paying for prescription drugs and other necessities, like food and shelter." 

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Democrats outlined five areas where they are willing to work with Trump, including helping give the Secretary of Health and Human Services the ability to negotiate drug prices.

"Under current law, the Secretary is prohibited from doing so. We urge you to work with Congress to pass a law that lifts the current ban and gives the Secretary the authority to take immediate action and negotiate better prices for prescription drugs for our nation’s more than 40 million Medicare Part D beneficiaries," the senators wrote. 

Trump criticized high drug prices during the campaign, including saying in New Hampshire that Medicare could save $300 billion a year on prescription drugs if it negotiated prices. 

"We don't do it," he said at the time. "Why? Because of the drug companies." 

Sanders tried to amend a bipartisan medical innovation bill earlier this month to include a provision allowing for drug prices to be negotiated, but he was blocked by Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntTrump ramps up battle with Republican leadership Hillary Clinton says she hopes GOP will 'find its soul' Blunt retirement shakes up Missouri Senate race MORE. The Missouri Republican argued that it could sink passage of the 21st Century Cures Act. 

Democrats are calling on Trump to "increase transparency" by allowing patients to know a drug's "true cost," including tax credits the company receives and the amount of money spent on research and development. 

They also want to Trump to help stop "abusive" price hikes on prescription drugs, help use taxpayer money to research "affordable and effective drugs," and "ensure true competition." 

"It is past time to end the rigging of the prescription drug marketplace," the Democrats wrote. "We urge you to task the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice with aggressively enforcing laws that currently exist and push for new provisions to ensure timely entrance of generics to the marketplace."

In addition to Brown and Franken, Democratic Sens. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyBottom line Senate inches toward COVID-19 vote after marathon session COVID-19 relief debate stalls in Senate amid Democratic drama MORE (Vt.), Dick DurbinDick DurbinDemocrats near pressure point on nixing filibuster  Senate approves sweeping coronavirus measure in partisan vote Senate rejects Cruz effort to block stimulus checks for undocumented immigrants MORE (Ill.), Jack ReedJack ReedUS proposes interim power-sharing deal between Taliban, Afghan government: report Lawmakers gird for spending battle over nuclear weapons Overnight Defense: Tim Kaine moves to claw back war powers authority | Study on sexual harassment and assault in the military MORE (R.I.), Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowSchumer insists Democrats unified after chaotic coronavirus debate Senate rejects Cruz effort to block stimulus checks for undocumented immigrants Democratic centrists flex power on Biden legislation MORE (Mich.), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDemocrats near pressure point on nixing filibuster  Hillicon Valley: China implicated in Microsoft breach | White House adds Big Tech critic | QAnon unfazed after false prediction FDA signals plan to address toxic elements in baby food MORE (Minn.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseFeds looking at communications between lawmakers, Capitol rioters: report FBI director commits to providing Senate information after grilling from Democrat Biden nominee previews post-Trump trade agenda MORE (R.I.), Tom UdallTom UdallOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Haaland courts moderates during tense confirmation hearing | GOP's Westerman looks to take on Democrats on climate change | White House urges passage of House public lands package Udalls: Haaland criticism motivated 'by something other than her record' Senate approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee MORE (N.M), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenSenate approves sweeping coronavirus measure in partisan vote The eight Democrats who voted 'no' on minimum wage Justice Democrats call moderates' votes against minimum wage hike 'unconscionable' MORE (N.H.), Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyHouse-passed election bill takes aim at foreign interference Bipartisan bill would ban lawmakers from buying, selling stocks Pentagon prevented immediate response to mob, says Guard chief MORE (Ore.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandABC names new deputy political director, weekend White House correspondent The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Lawmakers face Capitol threat as senators line up votes for relief bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate Dems face unity test; Tanden nomination falls MORE (N.Y), Richard Blumenthal (Conn.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinJohnson says leaving office after 2022 'probably my preference now' Democrats push Biden to include recurring payments in recovery package Biden signs supply chain order after 'positive' meeting with lawmakers MORE (Wis.), Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocrats near pressure point on nixing filibuster  Overnight Defense: White House open to reforming war powers | Army base might house migrant children | Fauci scolds military on vaccine White House open to reforming war powers amid bipartisan push MORE (Va.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenSenate rejects Sanders minimum wage hike Philly city council calls on Biden to 'cancel all student loan debt' in first 100 days Hillicon Valley: High alert as new QAnon date approaches Thursday | Biden signals another reversal from Trump with national security guidance | Parler files a new case MORE (Mass.), Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyLawmakers gird for spending battle over nuclear weapons Hillicon Valley: High alert as new QAnon date approaches Thursday | Biden signals another reversal from Trump with national security guidance | Parler files a new case Senators question Bezos, Amazon about cameras placed in delivery vans MORE (Mass.), Sanders and King signed the letter.