Senate Dems introduce bill to block Trump Muslim registry
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Senate Democrats are introducing legislation to prevent the establishment of a federal religion-based registry for immigrants ahead of the incoming Donald TrumpDonald TrumpBiden to move ahead with billion UAE weapons sale approved by Trump Fox News hires high-profile defense team in Dominion defamation lawsuit Associate indicted in Gaetz scandal cooperating with DOJ: report MORE administration.

Nine Democratic senators said Thursday that they have filed a bill blocking the executive branch from registering people based on religion, race, gender, age, national origin or nationality.

"Contrary to the President-elect's beliefs, America's diversity is not a threat — it is, in fact, our greatest strength," Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyFace mask PPE is everywhere now — including the ocean Green tech isn't all it's cracked up to be 2024 GOP White House hopefuls lead opposition to Biden Cabinet MORE (D-Ore.) said in a statement.

He added that "if our incoming President ever attempts to create a discriminatory database of Americans, let this be our warning shot: we will fight him every step of the way and in every way we can."

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Trump floated a database to track Muslims in the U.S. during the campaign, telling NBC in November 2015, "I would certainly implement that."

Asked last month if he was rethinking his proposals to require Muslims to register or to ban them from entering the U.S., Trump told reporters, "You know my plans all along, and I've been proven to be right."

The Department of Homeland Security moved last month to formally get rid of the National Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS), which was suspended in 2011 and largely used to track foreign nationals from Muslim-majority countries.

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) said Thursday that the legislation from Democrats would stop Trump or other administrations "from infringing on religious liberty by creating an immigration-related religious registry."

In addition to Booker and Merkley, Democratic Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenForgiving K in school loans would free 36 million student borrowers from debt: data IRS chief warns of unpaid taxes hitting trillion Biden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  MORE (Mass.), Brian Schatz (Hawaii), Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyHillicon Valley: Supreme Court sides with Google in copyright fight against Oracle | Justices dismiss suit over Trump's blocking of critics on Twitter | Tim Cook hopes Parler will return to Apple Store Democrats press Facebook on plans for Instagram for kids Give Republicans the climate credit they deserve MORE (Mass.), Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurraySchumer kicks into reelection mode Democrats target Trump methane rule with Congressional Review Act Senators eye rollback of Trump methane rule with Congressional Review Act MORE (Wash.), Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyBiden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  Senate GOP opens door to earmarks House Budget Committee 'not considering' firing CBO director MORE (Vt.) and Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoSenate GOP signal they won't filibuster debate of hate crimes bill Rep. Andy Kim on Asian hate: 'I've never felt this level of fear' Democrats work to pick up GOP support on anti-Asian hate crimes bill MORE (Hawaii), as well as Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  Why does Bernie Sanders want to quash Elon Musk's dreams? Congress can protect sacred Oak Flat in Arizona from mining project MORE (I-Vt.), who caucuses with Senate Democrats, are backing the legislation.

Democrats could face an uphill battle to clear the legislation through the Senate. They'll need 60 votes to pass the legislation, including at least 12 Republicans.