More than 80 lawmakers have called on the Obama administration to allow gay men to donate blood. 

The lawmakers say the administration should change what they say is an "outdated" policy.

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Eighty-two lawmakers in the House and Senate signed on to the letter, including Sens. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — The Hill interviews President Trump Poll: Democrats inch forward in Wisconsin Primary turnout soars in 2018 with Dems leading charge MORE (D-Wis.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziCruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke Budget chairs press appropriators on veterans spending Forcing faith-based agencies out of the system is a disservice to women MORE (R-Wyo.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenElection Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls On The Money: Midterms to shake up House finance panel | Chamber chief says US not in trade war | Mulvaney moving CFPB unit out of DC | Conservatives frustrated over big spending bills Warren suggests Mulvaney broke law by speaking to GOP donors MORE (D-Mass.). Enzi was the only Republican to sign the letter.

They said Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen SebeliusKathleen SebeliusProgressives set to test appeal of prairie populism in Kansas primary Overcoming health-care challenges by moving from volume to value Mr. President, let markets help save Medicare MORE should re-evaluate blood donation criteria that ban gay men from donating blood for life.

“Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic more than 30 years ago, the scientific community’s understanding of the virus has changed dramatically," the lawmakers said in their letter. 

"We have seen vast advances in blood screening technology, blood donation policy changes in other countries allowing MSM to donate, and opposition from our nation’s blood banks who have called the current ban ‘medically and scientifically unwarranted,’” the letter stated. MSM refers to gay men.

“Our current policies turn away healthy, willing donors, even when we face serious blood shortages. Further, the existing lifetime ban continues to perpetuate inaccurate stereotypes against gay and bisexual men, and fosters an atmosphere that promotes discrimination.”

The lawmakers applauded HHS for conducting studies and considering changes to the rules, but said HHS has not moved swiftly enough considering that other developed countries have re-evaluated their policies on blood donations from gay men.

“We look forward to ending this outdated policy and moving forward with securing the nation’s blood supply in a scientifically sound manner,” the lawmakers wrote.

Eighteen senators and 64 House members signed the letter.