Intel Committee Dems to Trump: Read torture report
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Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee are urging President Trump to read a 2014 report on the CIA's programs before deciding to restart "enhanced interrogation."  

Seven senators on the committee sent a letter to Trump on Thursday saying it is of the "utmost importance" that he read the committee's findings. 

"To avoid making the mistakes of the past it is of the utmost importance that you familiarize yourself with, and ensure that any Executive Branch officials involved in the formation of policy on detention and interrogation review, the full Committee study," they wrote in the letter. 

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerDems reject Barr's offer to view Mueller report with fewer redactions GOP senators divided on Trump trade pushback Hillicon Valley: Trump unveils initiatives to boost 5G | What to know about the Assange case | Pelosi warns tech of 'new era' in regulation | Dem eyes online hate speech bill MORE (D-Va.), the top Democrat on the committee, as well as Democratic Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDems reject Barr's offer to view Mueller report with fewer redactions Five takeaways from Mueller's report Only four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates MORE (Calif.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOn The Money: Inside the Mueller report | Cain undeterred in push for Fed seat | Analysis finds modest boost to economy from new NAFTA | White House says deal will give auto sector B boost Government report says new NAFTA would have minimal impact on economy Hillicon Valley: Washington preps for Mueller report | Barr to hold Thursday presser | Lawmakers dive into AI ethics | FCC chair moves to block China Mobile | Dem bill targets 'digital divide' | Microsoft denies request for facial recognition tech MORE (Ore.),  Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichNew Mexico senators request probe into militia group detaining migrants Lawmakers, tech set for clash over AI Why America needs the ability to track enemy missiles from space MORE (N.M.), Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinCain says he withdrew from Fed consideration because of 'pay cut' On The Money: Cain 'very committed' to Fed bid despite opposition | Pelosi warns no US-UK trade deal if Brexit harms Irish peace | Ivanka Trump says she turned down World Bank job Cain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed MORE (W.Va.), Kamala Harris (Calif.) and Independent Sen. Angus KingAngus Stanley KingOvernight Energy: Trump moves to crack down on Iranian oil exports | Florida lawmakers offer bill to ban drilling off state's coast | Bloomberg donates .5M to Paris deal Florida lawmakers offer bill to ban drilling off state's coast Angus King: 'Mueller passed the obstruction question to the Congress and Barr intercepted the pass' MORE (Maine) signed the letter. 

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They added that the report was meant to be used for any future interrogation guidelines and "remains a critical resource for anyone considering detention and interrogation policy." 

The 2014 report found that many of the CIA's practices were overly brutal and possibly illegal. The Democrats noted that both Mike Pompeo, the new CIA director, and Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump poised to roll back transgender health protections Trump claims Mueller didn't speak to those 'closest' to him And the winner of the Robert Mueller Sweepstakes is — Vladimir Putin MORE, nominated to be attorney general, pledged that they would review the full report. 

A draft executive order circulated this week sparked a new round of debate over interrogation techniques, including waterboarding.

The order would revoke a series of Obama administration rules that closed CIA "black sites," granted Red Cross access to all detainees and limited interrogators to techniques approved in the Army Field Manual. 

The Senate Democrats said reports that Trump is considering restarting the Bush-era programs are "deeply troubling." 

But White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Wednesday the document wasn't from the White House, adding, “I have no idea where it came from."

But he refused to answer questions about whether Trump was weighing the basic policy recommendations contained in the draft order. 

Trump signaled during an interview with ABC News on Wednesday that his administration would be announcing its plan for CIA black sites within hours, but as of Thursday evening the White House hadn't made an announcement.

He also noted that he had been discussing waterboarding "as recently as 24 hours ago with people at the highest level of intelligence."

Feinstein previously pushed late last year for the outgoing Obama administration to make the full 7,000-page document public. 

While Obama told Senate Intelligence leaders he would preserve report in his presidential papers, he didn't declassify the document before leaving office earlier this month.