Intel Committee Dems to Trump: Read torture report
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Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee are urging President Trump to read a 2014 report on the CIA's programs before deciding to restart "enhanced interrogation."  

Seven senators on the committee sent a letter to Trump on Thursday saying it is of the "utmost importance" that he read the committee's findings. 

"To avoid making the mistakes of the past it is of the utmost importance that you familiarize yourself with, and ensure that any Executive Branch officials involved in the formation of policy on detention and interrogation review, the full Committee study," they wrote in the letter. 

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerHillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill to hold platforms accountable for misinformation during health crises | Website outages hit Olympics, Amazon and major banks Senators introduce bipartisan bill to secure critical groups against hackers Hillicon Valley: Senators introduce bill to require some cyber incident reporting | UK citizen arrested in connection to 2020 Twitter hack | Officials warn of cyber vulnerabilities in water systems MORE (D-Va.), the top Democrat on the committee, as well as Democratic Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinBiden signs bill to bolster crime victims fund Stripping opportunity from DC's children Progressive groups ask for town hall with Feinstein to talk filibuster MORE (Calif.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOn The Money: Senate braces for nasty debt ceiling fight | Democrats pushing for changes to bipartisan deal | Housing prices hit new high in June Top Democrat presses IRS for improvements to web tool on child tax credit Democrat stalls Biden's border nominee MORE (Ore.),  Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichSenate panel advances controversial public lands nominee in tie vote A plan to address the growing orphaned wells crisis Schumer vows to only pass infrastructure package that is 'a strong, bold climate bill' MORE (N.M.), Joe ManchinJoe ManchinOvernight Energy: Senate panel advances controversial public lands nominee | Nevada Democrat introduces bill requiring feds to develop fire management plan | NJ requiring public water systems to replace lead pipes in 10 years Transit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal Senate panel advances controversial public lands nominee in tie vote MORE (W.Va.), Kamala Harris (Calif.) and Independent Sen. Angus KingAngus KingSenate falling behind on infrastructure Hillicon Valley: Senators introduce bill to require some cyber incident reporting | UK citizen arrested in connection to 2020 Twitter hack | Officials warn of cyber vulnerabilities in water systems Bipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor MORE (Maine) signed the letter. 

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They added that the report was meant to be used for any future interrogation guidelines and "remains a critical resource for anyone considering detention and interrogation policy." 

The 2014 report found that many of the CIA's practices were overly brutal and possibly illegal. The Democrats noted that both Mike Pompeo, the new CIA director, and Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsDemocrat stalls Biden's border nominee Garland strikes down Trump-era immigration court rule, empowering judges to pause cases Unsealed documents detail Trump and Biden efforts on reporter records MORE, nominated to be attorney general, pledged that they would review the full report. 

A draft executive order circulated this week sparked a new round of debate over interrogation techniques, including waterboarding.

The order would revoke a series of Obama administration rules that closed CIA "black sites," granted Red Cross access to all detainees and limited interrogators to techniques approved in the Army Field Manual. 

The Senate Democrats said reports that Trump is considering restarting the Bush-era programs are "deeply troubling." 

But White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Wednesday the document wasn't from the White House, adding, “I have no idea where it came from."

But he refused to answer questions about whether Trump was weighing the basic policy recommendations contained in the draft order. 

Trump signaled during an interview with ABC News on Wednesday that his administration would be announcing its plan for CIA black sites within hours, but as of Thursday evening the White House hadn't made an announcement.

He also noted that he had been discussing waterboarding "as recently as 24 hours ago with people at the highest level of intelligence."

Feinstein previously pushed late last year for the outgoing Obama administration to make the full 7,000-page document public. 

While Obama told Senate Intelligence leaders he would preserve report in his presidential papers, he didn't declassify the document before leaving office earlier this month.