Senators are moving to shore up the U.S.-Australian relationship after reports of a contentious call between President Trump and the Australian prime minister. 
 
"I don't know what happened during last week's telephone call between the president of the United States and the prime minister of Australia," Sen. Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderAuthorities link ex-Tennessee governor to killing of Jimmy Hoffa associate The Republicans' deep dive into nativism Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain MORE (R-Tenn.) said from the Senate floor. 
 
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"But I do know this, the people of the United States do not have better friends than the people of Australia. We're more than friends." 

The Washington Post reported last week that Trump lashed out at Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull during a phone call between the leaders.

The president boasted about his Electoral College victory, blasted a previous plan under which the U.S. would accept refugees from Australia and cut short what was expected to be an hourlong call, according to the Post. 

In the wake of the call, GOP Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP group launches million ad campaign pressing Kelly on filibuster Heatwaves don't lie: Telling the truth about climate change Overnight Energy: Lake Mead's decline points to scary water future in West | White House leads opposition to raising gas tax | Biden taps ex-New Mexico lawmaker for USDA post MORE (Ariz.) and Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (Tenn.) made phone calls to Joe Hockey, the Australian ambassador to the U.S., to voice their support of the alliance. 

The senators added in the resolution that "an alliance bond is a sacred vow of friendship and trust, and Australia has always been a faithful and reliable partner to the United States."

Alexander, whose family spent six months in Australia after he stepped down from the governor's office, praised the two countries' ties, noting they have fought together dating back to World War One.

"Today no two countries trust one another and cooperate in security agreements more than Australia and America. We trade. We visit one another," Alexander said.

Sens. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate to vote on elections bill Congress barrels toward debt cliff Excellence Act will expand mental health and substance use treatment access to millions MORE (R-Mo.), Dick DurbinDick DurbinBiden administration to back bill ending crack, powder cocaine sentence disparity: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats await Manchin decision on voting rights bill Supreme Court battle could wreak havoc with Biden's 2020 agenda MORE (D-Ill.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenWhite House advisers huddle with Senate moderates on infrastructure Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Biden struggles to detail post-withdrawal Afghanistan plans MORE (D-N.H.), Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsCutting critical family support won't solve the labor crisis Progressive groups ramp up pressure on Feinstein Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE (D-Del.), and Cory Booker (D-N.J.), are also supporting the resolution. 

Reps. Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.) and Jackie Speier (D-Calif.) introduced an identical resolution in the House.