Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerFacebook reeling after damning NYT report Schumer warns Trump to stay out of government funding negotiations Schumer predicts Nelson will 'continue being senator' if 'every vote counted' MORE (D-N.Y.) is calling for an "impartial and independent" investigation into Russia's interference in the presidential election following President Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey.

Schumer outlined Democratic demands in a speech on the Senate floor Wednesday, voicing concern that the "subject" of the FBI's investigation into potential ties between the Trump campaign and Russia may try to "quash" the probe.

"The only thing we are seeking is that the investigations are carried out in an impartial and independent way, that we get all the facts," Schumer said. "All we are seeking is some assurance that the subject of this investigation is not able to influence it or, God forbid, quash it."

Schumer said Democrats agreed to three priorities in a closed-door caucus meeting Wednesday: that Rod Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general, should not be the one to appoint a special prosecutor for an investigation into Russia's meddling in the election; that Comey needs to meet with the Senate; and that Rosenstein and Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsAttorneys want Supreme Court to determine legality of Whitaker as acting AG Hillicon Valley: Russian-linked hackers may have impersonated US officials | Trump signs DHS cyber bill | Prosecutors inadvertently reveal charges against Assange | Accenture workers protest border enforcement work | App mines crypto for bail bonds McCarthy, other Republicans back Ratcliffe to be next attorney general MORE should meet separately with senators. 
 
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Schumer — crediting Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinLawmakers say California will eventually get emergency funding for fire relief Top Dems: DOJ position on Whitaker appointment 'fatally flawed' Congress needs to wake up to nuclear security threat MORE (Calif.), the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee — said if a special prosecutor for the FBI's investigation is named, the "highest-serving career civil servant" should pick the individual. 
 
"Serious doubts have been cast on Mr. Rosenstein's impartiality," he said. "Mr. Rostenstein signed his name to a highly political memo arguing for Director Comey's dismissal." 
 
Senate GOP leadership has shown no sign that it has reversed course and would support a special counsel for the investigation.
 
 
Schumer repeated the demand on Wednesday afternoon, adding that "they should do it soon because the questions are just swirling about." 
 
Democrats are signaling that they are willing to slow down the Senate in a bid to get leverage in the fight over Comey's firing. They blocked a routine request for committees to meet earlier Wednesday, sparking GOP frustration. 
 
Sens. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerFacebook reeling after damning NYT report On The Money: Trump, Senate leaders to huddle on border wall funding | Fed bank regulator walks tightrope on Dodd-Frank | Koch-backed groups blast incentives for corporations after Amazon deal Schumer told Warner to back off of Facebook: report MORE (D-Va.) and Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrRand Paul blocking Trump counterterrorism nominee Senate panel seeks interview with Steve Bannon, lawyer says Dems can use subpoena power to reclaim the mantle of populism MORE (R-N.C.) have invited Comey to testify next week as part of a closed-door hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee. Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHillicon Valley: Russian-linked hackers may have impersonated US officials | Trump signs DHS cyber bill | Prosecutors inadvertently reveal charges against Assange | Accenture workers protest border enforcement work | App mines crypto for bail bonds Dems demand answers from AT&T, Verizon and Sprint on internet throttling claims Warren, 2020 Dems target private immigration detention center operators MORE (D-Ore.), another member of the Intelligence panel, has also publicly called on Comey to testify.
 
Schumer praised the move, arguing it was the "right thing" to do. 
 
"We ought to hear from Mr. Comey. At this moment [there is] a profound doubt about the reasons and timing of FBI Director Comey's firing by the president, about the status and progress of the very serious investigation into the Trump campaign and Russia by his agency. We require answers," Schumer said.