Wyden puts 'hold' on nominee in push for Trump-Russia financial details
© Keren Carrion

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Top Dems call for end to Medicaid work rules | Chamber launching ad blitz against Trump drug plan | Google offers help to dispose of opioids Top Dems call for end to Medicaid work rules after 18,000 lose coverage in Arkansas Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Drug pricing fight centers on insulin | Florida governor working with Trump to import cheaper drugs | Dems blast proposed ObamaCare changes MORE (D-Ore.) said Wednesday that he's placed a hold on President Trump's pick to oversee the administration's sanctions policy, adding that he'll only lift the hold if the Treasury Department provides documents about the financial ties between Russia and Trump associates.

"I have stated repeatedly that we have to follow the money if we are going to get to the bottom of how Russia has attacked our democracy. That means thoroughly review any information that relates to financial connections between Russia and President Trump and his associates," Wyden said in a statement. 
 
He added that Sigal Mandelker, Trump's choice to be the Treasury undersecretary for terrorism and financial crimes, will be "responsible for much of this information." 
 
Using the "hold" allows Wyden to slow down the nomination process. 
 
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Wyden said that he will maintain his hold on Mandleker's nomination until the Treasury Department gives the Senate Intelligence and Finance Committees  "information and documents related to Russia and its financial dealings" related to President Trump and aides.
 
Wyden sits on both committees.
 
The leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee sent a request earlier this month to the Treasury Department's financial crimes unit for similar information.
 
Warner told CNN at the time that he wouldn't support Mandelker's nomination until the committee received the information. 
 
"Until we get it, I'm not going to support the administration's nominee for undersecretary of Treasury finance, for terrorism and finance, because they owe us these documents first," Warner said.

Senators routinely use holds as leverage on other issues. For example, Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyThe Hill's Morning Report - What to watch for as Mueller’s probe winds down Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Drug pricing fight centers on insulin | Florida governor working with Trump to import cheaper drugs | Dems blast proposed ObamaCare changes Drug pricing fight centers on insulin MORE (R-Iowa) held up to roughly two dozen State Department nominations in an effort to get the department to respond to his questions about former secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: Trump pushes to speed up 5G rollout | Judge hits Roger Stone with full gag order | Google ends forced arbitration | Advertisers leave YouTube after report on pedophile ring 4 ways Hillary looms over the 2020 race Hillary Clinton met with Biden, Klobuchar to talk 2020: report MORE and her top aides. 

Sen. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyClimate hedgehogs and foxes Overnight Energy: Trump ends talks with California on car emissions | Dems face tough vote on Green New Deal | Climate PAC backing Inslee in possible 2020 run AOC's green deal isn't new — it's been a flop in Germany MORE (D-Mass.) also had a hold on Robert Califf, former President Obama's FDA nominee, but Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Energy: Trump ends talks with California on car emissions | Dems face tough vote on Green New Deal | Climate PAC backing Inslee in possible 2020 run Poll: 33% of Kentucky voters approve of McConnell Five takeaways from McCabe’s allegations against Trump MORE (R-Ky.) successfully forced a vote on the nomination.