Wyden puts 'hold' on nominee in push for Trump-Russia financial details
© Keren Carrion

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Democrats call on Biden administration to ease entry to US for at-risk Afghans Schumer opted for modest rules reform after pushback from moderates MORE (D-Ore.) said Wednesday that he's placed a hold on President Trump's pick to oversee the administration's sanctions policy, adding that he'll only lift the hold if the Treasury Department provides documents about the financial ties between Russia and Trump associates.

"I have stated repeatedly that we have to follow the money if we are going to get to the bottom of how Russia has attacked our democracy. That means thoroughly review any information that relates to financial connections between Russia and President Trump and his associates," Wyden said in a statement. 
 
He added that Sigal Mandelker, Trump's choice to be the Treasury undersecretary for terrorism and financial crimes, will be "responsible for much of this information." 
 
Using the "hold" allows Wyden to slow down the nomination process. 
 
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Wyden said that he will maintain his hold on Mandleker's nomination until the Treasury Department gives the Senate Intelligence and Finance Committees  "information and documents related to Russia and its financial dealings" related to President Trump and aides.
 
Wyden sits on both committees.
 
The leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee sent a request earlier this month to the Treasury Department's financial crimes unit for similar information.
 
Warner told CNN at the time that he wouldn't support Mandelker's nomination until the committee received the information. 
 
"Until we get it, I'm not going to support the administration's nominee for undersecretary of Treasury finance, for terrorism and finance, because they owe us these documents first," Warner said.

Senators routinely use holds as leverage on other issues. For example, Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Hillicon Valley — Senate panel advances major antitrust bill Senate panel advances bill blocking tech giants from favoring own products MORE (R-Iowa) held up to roughly two dozen State Department nominations in an effort to get the department to respond to his questions about former secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonNo Hillary — the 'Third Way' is the wrong way The dangerous erosion of Democratic Party foundations The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats see victory in a voting rights defeat MORE and her top aides. 

Sen. Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyOvernight Energy & Environment — Starting from 'scratch' on climate, spending bill Overnight Health Care — White House boosts mask availability Senate Democrats call for investigation into reported price gouging for COVID-19 tests MORE (D-Mass.) also had a hold on Robert Califf, former President Obama's FDA nominee, but Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 WATCH: The Hill recaps the top stories of the week Effort to overhaul archaic election law wins new momentum MORE (R-Ky.) successfully forced a vote on the nomination.