Senate Democrats held a nearly four-hour talk-a-thon on Monday night to protest the latest GOP bill to repeal and replace ObamaCare ahead of a potential vote next week. 

 
The Democratic floor protest ran just under four hours, kicking off at 6:51 p.m. with a speech by Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinGOP blocks debt limit hike, government funding The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Democrats stare down 'hell' week Biden sidesteps GOP on judicial vacancies, for now MORE (D-Ill.) and wrapping around 10:40 p.m. 
 
Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenIn defense of share buybacks Democrats urge Biden to go all in with agenda in limbo In Washington, the road almost never taken MORE (D-Mass.) ripped the effort, saying it wasn't "more reasonable" or "more moderate" than a failed attempt in July. 
 
"It's just another version of the same old cruel, heartless, shameless plan that Republicans have spent the last eight months trying to jam down the throats of the American people," she said from the Senate floor. 
 
 
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Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerLawmakers gear up for spending bill, infrastructure votes Booker: End of police reform negotiations a 'frustrating experience' Sunday shows - All eyes on spending votes MORE (D-N.J.) said the upcoming debate over the Graham-Cassidy health care bill is a "moral moment" and a "call to the conscience of our country." 

"We face a time of jeopardy. Decision point. A cross roads ... of our values, a cross roads of our ideals," he said. "The decisions made here are not always easy." 
 
In addition to Merkley, Warren, Durbin and Booker, Democratic Sens. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinBiden sidesteps GOP on judicial vacancies, for now Democrats confront 'Rubik's cube on steroids' Warren, Daines introduce bill honoring 13 killed in Kabul attack MORE (Wis.), Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyBiden sidesteps GOP on judicial vacancies, for now Democrats urge Biden to go all in with agenda in limbo House passes bill to ensure abortion access in response to Texas law MORE Jr. (Pa.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOn The Money — House pushes toward infrastructure vote Hillicon Valley — Presented by Xerox — EU calls out Russian hacking efforts aimed at member states Why Democrats opposing Biden's tax plan have it wrong MORE (Ore.) and Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzManchin raises red flag on carbon tax Panic begins to creep into Democratic talks on Biden agenda Hotel workers need a lifeline; It's time to pass The Save Hotel Jobs Act MORE (Hawaii) spoke from the floor.
 
"I want to be clear, this Cassidy bill will flunk the Jimmy Kimmel test of not hurting kids in America with pre-existing conditions," Wyden said. 
 
Murphy, wrapping up the Democratic speeches, argued that the Graham-Cassidy healthcare bill was the "meanest version of TrumpCare yet." 

"Kids are going to die if they don't have access to healthcare," Murphy said. "If 20 million people lose insurance ... thousands of people won't be able to survive." 

The CBO hasn't estimated yet how many individuals would lose their health insurance under the Graham-Cassidy bill. The agency previously estimated that 22 million people could become uninsured under previous GOP bill. 

Murphy noted that as a member of the Senate's Health Committee he's been working on a bipartisan deal aimed at stabilizing health insurance markets. 

"What a great trick Republicans will have pulled on this country. Everybody said that the repeal bill was dead; that we were going to move on to a bipartisan process," he said. "What a great head fake that would be if it was all a lie. If it was all a ruse." 
 
The speeches come after Senate Minority Leader Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerObama says US 'desperately needs' Biden legislation ahead of key votes Congress shows signs of movement on stalled Biden agenda Schumer gets shoutout, standing ovation from crowd at Tony Awards MORE (D-N.Y.) warned that Democrats were "going to look at every possible way to slow this bill down.” 
 
In addition to floor speeches, Booker also held a Facebook Live event with colleagues, including Schumer, off the Senate floor to discuss the GOP healthcare bill.  
 
Democrats don't have the ability to block a GOP ObamaCare repeal bill on their own. Under the special "reconciliation" budget rules being used by Republicans, which expire at the end of the month, GOP lawmakers can avoid a Democratic filibuster and pass a healthcare bill with a simple majority. 
 
A repeal bill has little chance of passing the Senate if Democrats are able to filibuster it, meaning Republicans would need to win over at least eight Democrats to pass a bill. 
 
 
Cassidy and Graham have said believe they have roughly 48 GOP senators who would be willing to vote yes, putting them close, but not yet at, the 50 votes needed to let Vice President Pence break a tie. 
 
 
 

—Last updated at 11:09 p.m.