Senators push mandatory sexual harassment training for members, staff
© Greg Nash

Senators are pushing for changes to the Senate's sexual harassment policy, including making training mandatory.

Sens. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyCongress can retire the retirement crisis On The Money: Inside the Mueller report | Cain undeterred in push for Fed seat | Analysis finds modest boost to economy from new NAFTA | White House says deal will give auto sector B boost The 7 most interesting nuggets from the Mueller report MORE (R-Iowa), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinBiden says he will run for president in 2020: 'We have to remember who we are' Seven big decisions facing Biden in 2020 primary Dems reject Barr's offer to view Mueller report with fewer redactions MORE (D-Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharHarris wins town hall war among CNN viewers Cory Booker releases 10 years of tax returns Dems accuse White House of caving to Trump's 'ego' on Russian meddling MORE (D-Minn.), Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstTime to keep the promises for farmers to compete in energy Graham challenges Dems to walk the walk on impeachment McConnell pledges to be 'Grim Reaper' for progressive policies MORE (R-Iowa), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandGillibrand 'not worried' about being 'discounted' in 2020 race Cory Booker releases 10 years of tax returns Buttigieg gets first congressional endorsement MORE (D-N.Y.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore Capito20 Dems demand no more money for ICE agents, Trump wall We can accelerate a cure for Alzheimer's Gillibrand, Grassley reintroduce campus sexual assault bill MORE (R-W.Va.), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senator: 'No problem' with Mueller testifying The Hill's Morning Report — Category 5 Mueller storm to hit today GOP senators double down on demand for Clinton email probe documents MORE (R-Wis.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBooker fundraises off Biden announcement The symbol of 'Wakanda' and black political vision The Hill's Morning Report - Trump tells House investigators 'no' MORE (D-N.J.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOn The Money: Cain withdraws from Fed consideration | Says he didn't want 'pay cut' | Trump sues to block subpoena for financial records | Dems plot next move in Trump tax-return battle Cain withdraws from Fed consideration Cain says he 'won't run away from criticism' in push for Fed seat MORE (R-Alaska) introduced a resolution on Tuesday to require members, staff, interns, fellows and detailees to complete the training.

The resolution calls for the Senate Rules Committee to issue rules for sexual harassment training, including requiring training within 60 days once a member or Senate staffer starts their position, and would also give 60 days for anyone who has not previously undergone training to complete it.

"Today, I’m introducing a bipartisan resolution to ensure that the Rules Committee has the authority necessary to ensure that every member of this chamber, every employee on the Senate payroll, and every unpaid Senate intern receives anti-harassment training," Grassley said in a prepared statement.

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Grassley previously asked the Rules Committee, overseen by Klobuchar and Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig Shelby20 Dems demand no more money for ICE agents, Trump wall Conservatives urge Trump to stick with Moore for Fed Poll: Roy Moore leading Alabama GOP field MORE (R-Ala.), to make training mandatory, but was told that the Senate would likely need to pass a resolution giving them that authority.

Klobuchar reiterated that she believes sexual harassment training should be mandatory. 
 “I look forward to working with Senator Grassley and my Rules Committee colleagues to pass and implement this important update to Senate policy," she said. 

The resolution would also require offices to turn over information on who has completed sexual harassment training and pitches change to the Senate's training program including having "practical examples aimed at instructing supervisors in the prevention of harassment, discrimination, and retaliation."

It would also require the Senate's sergeant at arms to develop and conduct an "anonymous survey of Members, officers and employees of the Senate relating to the prevalence of sexual harassment in the Senate during the previous Congress."  
 
In addition to Grassley's previously letter, Gillibrand said late last week that she was working on her own legislation. 

"What you see time and again in institutions all around the country is a culture where power and fear keep sexual assault and sexual harassment in the shadows. Congress is no different. Congress should never be above the law or play by their own set of rules," Gillibrand added on Tuesday.