Senate passes resolution requiring mandatory sexual harassment training
© Greg Nash

The Senate cleared a resolution on Thursday requiring that all senators and staffers undergo sexual harassment training. 

The Senate unanimously passed the resolution as part of the chamber's nightly wrap-up amid pressure from senators in both parties to change the chamber's voluntary training policy. 

The resolution was introduced earlier Thursday by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOcasio-Cortez rips Trump in first House floor speech: 'It is not normal to shut down the government when we don’t get what we want' Overnight Health Care: Dem chair plans hearing on Medicare for all | Senate GOP talks drug prices with Trump health chief | PhRMA CEO hopeful Trump reverses course on controversial pricing proposal Supporters leave notes on plaque outside Ocasio-Cortez's office MORE (R-Ky.), along with Sens. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Health Care: Dem chair plans hearing on Medicare for all | Senate GOP talks drug prices with Trump health chief | PhRMA CEO hopeful Trump reverses course on controversial pricing proposal IRS waiving penalty for some in first filing season under Trump's tax law HHS secretary, Senate Finance Republicans talk drug pricing MORE (R-Iowa), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean Klobuchar5 takeaways from Barr’s testimony Klobuchar dismisses mock campaign logo as something from 'very enthusiastic supporter' Grandson's note to Barr during confirmation hearing goes viral MORE (D-Minn.), Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyCentrist efforts to convince Trump to end shutdown falter Bipartisan group of senators will urge Trump to reopen government for 3 weeks Leaders nix recess with no shutdown deal in sight MORE (R-Ala.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoOvernight Energy: Wheeler weathers climate criticism at confirmation hearing | Dems want Interior to stop drilling work during shutdown | 2018 was hottest year for oceans Dems blast EPA nominee at confirmation hearing Republican senators skeptical of using national emergency for wall funding MORE (R-W.Va.) and Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.). 

"Making harassment training mandatory in the Senate sends a clear message: harassment of any kind is not and will not be tolerated in Congress. Period,” Klobuchar, the top Democrat on the Rules Committee, said in a statement. 

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Grassley added that Congress has "a particular duty to set high standards of conduct." 

"By passing this resolution, we take a step to ensure that all who work for the Senate are able to do their job without feeling unsafe or uncomfortable," he added. 

The resolution requires training to be completed within 60 days and repeated at least once during every session of Congress, which lasts two years.
 
It also authorizes the Rules Committee, headed up by Shelby and Klobuchar, to issue any guidance or regulations necessary to carry out the new sexual harassment training policy. 
 
Senators in both parties have been urging the chamber to make the Office of Compliance's voluntary sexual harassment training program mandatory for lawmakers and staffers. 
 
Grassley previously asked the Rules Committee about the issue but was told that the Senate would likely need to pass a resolution giving them that authority.
 
 
Meanwhile, a group of senators introduced a similar resolution that would require mandatory training on Wednesday. 
 
Four in 10 of the women who responded to a Roll Call survey earlier this year said they believed Capitol Hill had a sexual harassment problem, while one in six said they had experienced it personally. 
 
And one current lawmaker and three former lawmakers told The Associated Press that they had experienced sexual harassment or hostile comments around the Capitol. Staffers also described to Roll Call the worry that reporting an incident would negatively impact their careers. 
 
The push on Capitol Hill comes in the aftermath of a spate of allegations of sexual harassment and assault against high-profile figures in media and politics.

GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore is currently battling calls for him to step aside after The Washington Post reported that Moore had an inappropriate sexual encounter with a minor in 1979.
 
Leigh Corfman, now 53, told the newspaper that Moore kissed her, touched her under her underwear and placed her hand over his underwear when she was 14 years old and he was 32. 
 
The story also quotes three other women who say Moore approached them when he was in his 30s and they were teenagers, but that no sexual contact occurred — outside of kissing in some of those cases. 
 
Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerCardi B expresses solidarity with federal workers not getting paid Government shutdown impasse is a leveraging crisis Overnight Health Care: Dem chair meets Trump health chief on drug prices | Trump officials sued over new Kentucky Medicaid work rules | Democrats vow to lift ban on federal funds for abortions MORE (D-N.Y.), as well as Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinFeinstein grappling with vote on AG nominee Barr 5 takeaways from Barr’s testimony Grandson's note to Barr during confirmation hearing goes viral MORE (D-Calif.), Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranTop 5 races to watch in 2019 Bottom Line Races Dems narrowly lost show party needs to return to Howard Dean’s 50 state strategy MORE (R-Miss.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinTrump AG pick: I won't be 'bullied' by anyone, including the president Live coverage: Trump AG pick grilled on Mueller probe at confirmation hearing Senate Dems set to take aim at new Trump attorney general pick MORE (D-Ill.), Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderMcConnell blocks House bill to reopen government for second time Senators restart shutdown talks — and quickly hit roadblocks GOP senators propose bill to pay 'excepted' workers during shutdown MORE (R-Tenn.), Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallSenate in last-minute talks to find deal to avert shutdown  House-passed stopgap measure in Senate limbo Consumer groups accuse Google of marketing inappropriate apps toward children MORE (D-N.M.), Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsBudowsky: Warning to Senate Republicans The Hill's Morning Report — Negotiations crumble as shutdown enters day 17 Pompeo seen as top recruit for Kansas Senate seat MORE (R-Kan.), Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerLeaders nix recess with no shutdown deal in sight Mobile providers at center of privacy storm Senators restart shutdown talks — and quickly hit roadblocks MORE (D-Va.), Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntMcConnell: Senate won't override Trump veto on shutdown fight Senate immigration talks fall apart Emergency declaration option for wall tests GOP MORE (R-Mo.), Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyGOP insiders knock their depictions in new Dick Cheney biopic ‘Vice’ Barr: It would be a crime for president to pardon someone in exchange for their silence Barr says Trump won't be allowed to 'correct' Mueller report MORE (D-Vt.), Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCongress can stop the war on science O'Rourke blogs from road trip: 'Have been stuck lately. In and out of a funk' Texas governor, top lawmakers tell Trump not to use hurricane relief funds to build border wall MORE (R-Texas), Angus KingAngus Stanley KingGOP senators challenge Trump on shutdown strategy Will Trump declare an emergency tonight? Only he knows for sure Senate in last-minute talks to find deal to avert shutdown  MORE (I-Maine), Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerOvernight Health Care: Dem chair plans hearing on Medicare for all | Senate GOP talks drug prices with Trump health chief | PhRMA CEO hopeful Trump reverses course on controversial pricing proposal Mobile providers at center of privacy storm The Memo: Trump moves to brink of emergency declaration MORE (R-Miss.) and Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerErnst elected to Senate GOP leadership This week: Congress starts lame-duck with leadership fight Senate GOP readies for leadership reshuffle MORE (R-Neb.), are co-sponsoring the resolution.