Senate Democrats want watchdog to launch probe into Wilbur Ross
© Greg Nash

A group of Senate Democrats want the Commerce Department's top watchdog to launch an investigation into Secretary Wilbur RossWilbur Louis RossSessions attacks judge who ordered officials to sit for depositions in challenges to Census citizenship question Harris accuses GOP of ‘weaponizing’ 2020 Census DOJ: Commerce chief spoke with Bannon, Sessions about census citizenship question MORE to determine if he is following the department's ethics requirements. 

Democratic Sens. Richard Blumenthal (Conn.), Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanElection Countdown: O'Rourke brings in massive M haul | Deal on judges lets senators return to the trail | Hurricane puts Florida candidates in the spotlight | Adelson spending big to save GOP in midterms Former Dem aide makes first court appearance on charges of posting GOP senators' info online Ex-House intern charged with 'doxing' GOP senators during Kavanaugh hearing MORE (N.H.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerOn The Money: Deficit hits six-year high of 9 billion | Yellen says Trump attacks threaten Fed | Affordable housing set for spotlight in 2020 race Affordable housing set for spotlight of next presidential campaign Cruz takes dig at Beto O’Rourke, calls him ‘top 10‘ contender for Dems in 2020 MORE (N.J.), Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellHillicon Valley: Facebook deletes accounts for political 'spam' | Leaked research shows Google's struggles with online free speech | Trump's praise for North Korea complicates cyber deterrence | Senators want Google memo on privacy bug Congress moves to ensure the greater availability of explosives detecting dogs in the US Overnight Energy — Presented by Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance — Trump ends law enforcement program at wildlife refuges | Pruitt canceled trips he already had tickets for | Senate panel approves new parks fund MORE (Wash.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinHillicon Valley: Facebook deletes accounts for political 'spam' | Leaked research shows Google's struggles with online free speech | Trump's praise for North Korea complicates cyber deterrence | Senators want Google memo on privacy bug Poll: Baldwin leads GOP challenger by double digits in Wisconsin The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by PhRMA — Trump, Pence fan out to protect the Rust Belt MORE (Wis.) and Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthHillicon Valley: Facebook deletes accounts for political 'spam' | Leaked research shows Google's struggles with online free speech | Trump's praise for North Korea complicates cyber deterrence | Senators want Google memo on privacy bug Senate Dem: Trump's 'fake, hyperbolic rantings' an insult to real Medal of Honor recipients Meteorologist wears her toddler to work in support of working mothers MORE (Ill.) sent a letter to Peggy Gustafson, the inspector general of the Commerce Department, asking that she open an investigation into Ross's compliance. 
 
"We write to request that you commence an investigation of Secretary Wilbur Ross and his chief of staff, Ms. Wendy Teramoto, to ensure that their conduct and representations are consistent with all ethical requirements of the U.S. Department of Commerce," the senators wrote. 
 
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The senators' request includes asking the inspector general to determine the "true value" of Ross's personal wealth, if he has complied with his ethics agreement including divesting his assets, if the agreement is adequate and if senior Commerce Department officials have been allowed to serve despite conflicts of interest. 
 
Documents leaked earlier this year, known as the "Paradise Papers," showed several individuals connected to President Trump as having legally protected their business investments or influenced policies that would keep client and company funds in tax havens.
 
Ross maintained shared business interests with Russian President Vladimir Putin's inner circle after joining the administration, according to documents obtained by The New York Times. 
 
Democrats also argued that there have been contradictory reports about the extent of Ross's wealth. Forbes reported earlier this month that Ross overstated his wealth by $2 billion. 
 
The senators, referencing the Forbes article, want the department's watchdog to study the "veracity" of Ross's statements about his wealth and if he "provided fabrications about other assets or shielded the existence of assets, and the extent to which false representations impacted the evaluation of and implementation of the ethics agreements he must now follow." 
 
They also want the department to verify that Ross is complying with his ethics agreement or if he has "participated in matters personally and substantially that could affect the assets he was allowed to retain."  
 
Ross told the BBC earlier this month that it is "evil" to say he failed to disclose holdings in a shipping firm with ties to Putin's family, adding that there is "nothing whatsoever improper" about the business links.
 
The Commerce Department told Forbes, in response to its report, that any misunderstandings were "unfortunate" but refused to provide additional information. 
 
"Secretary Ross has filed all required disclosures in accordance with the law and in consultation with both legal counsel and ethics officials at the Department of Commerce and Office of Government Ethics. As we have said before, any misunderstanding from your previous conversation with Secretary Ross is unfortunate," the agency said in a statement to Forbes at the time.
 
The Democrats also cite unnamed reports that Teramoto, Ross's chief of staff, continued serving on the board of a shipping company even after she started at the Commerce Department. 
 
“These reports about a clear and compelling conflict of interest make us question whether her efforts are focused on her personal business interests or the well-being of the American people,” the senators added.