Senate Democrats introduce bill to block Trump's refugee ban
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Senate Democrats are renewing their efforts to block President Trump's refugee ban, arguing it is being used as a recruiting tool for terrorist groups. 

The legislation, spearheaded by Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyDemocratic Sen. Chris Murphy announces book on gun violence Lawmakers join Nats Park fundraiser for DC kids charity Democrats look to demonize GOP leader MORE (D-Conn.), would block the administration from barring refugees based on what country they are from. 

"There’s no real danger to America from refugees who’ve gone through our vetting system and entered our country. The danger is that we help [the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria] recruit lone-wolf terrorists here at home by making clear that they have no place in our society. It’s up to Congress to fix this," Murphy said. 

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He added, "Trump’s refugee ban puts American lives at risk and it plays right into the hands of our enemies."

In addition to Murphy, Democratic Sens. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinCan new US Strategy on Women, Peace & Security give women a real seat at the table? Ask Afghan women Maryland lawmakers slam 'despicable' Trump remark about journalists on newsroom shooting anniversary Democrats leery of Sanders plan to cancel student loan debt MORE (Md.), Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyDems open to killing filibuster in next Congress Democrats warm to idea of studying reparations Senate Democrat releasing book on Trump admin's treatment of migrants at border MORE (Ore.), Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenTrump's new labor chief alarms Democrats, unions Al Franken: It's time to start taking Trump 'literally' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Mexican officials scramble to avoid Trump tariffs MORE (Minn.), Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyDemocrats warm to idea of studying reparations Hillicon Valley: Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency plan | Trump vows to 'take a look' at Google's ties to China | Google denies working with China's military | Tech execs on defensive at antitrust hearing | Bill would bar business with Huawei Senators press FTC over 'woefully inadequate' Facebook settlement MORE (Mass.), Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenOvernight Energy: USDA expected to lose two-thirds of research staff in move west | EPA hails Trump's work on reducing air pollution | Agency eyes reducing inspections of nuclear reactors USDA expected to lose two-thirds of research staff in move to Kansas City Lawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens MORE (Md.), Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoDems open to killing filibuster in next Congress Overnight Defense: Woman accusing general of sexual assault willing to testify | Joint Chiefs pick warns against early Afghan withdrawal | Tensions rise after Iran tries to block British tanker Joint chiefs nominee: Trump's transgender policy about 'standards' MORE (Hawaii) and Cory BookerCory Anthony Booker2020 Democrats react to 'send her back' chants at Trump rally The Hill's Morning Report - Trump seizes House impeachment vote to rally GOP Democrats warm to idea of studying reparations MORE (N.J.) are co-sponsoring the legislation, according to the Congressional Record. 

The Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit late last month that was brought by the state of Hawaii challenging the 90-day travel ban on nationals from six majority-Muslim countries and the 120-day halt on the U.S. refugee resettlement program, claiming the case is now moot.

But an appeals court ruled on Monday that the government can bar entry to people from six majority-Muslim countries — Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen — who lack ties to the United States.

The Trump administration has also capped the number of refugees the United States will accept overall at 45,000 for the fiscal year 2018 fiscal year. 

This week's legislation isn't the first time Democrats have tried to reverse the administration's travel restrictions. 

Sixteen Democrats introduced legislation, spearheaded by Murphy, to undercut the order by withholding funding to enforce it in March. 

Democrats are unlikely to block Trump's order through legislation. They would need 60 votes to clear the Senate, which would require the support of at least a dozen GOP senators.