Senate Democrats introduce bill to block Trump's refugee ban
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Senate Democrats are renewing their efforts to block President Trump's refugee ban, arguing it is being used as a recruiting tool for terrorist groups. 

The legislation, spearheaded by Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyConnecticut radio station rebrands itself 'Trump 103.3' Foreign Relations senators demand Iran briefing Prosecutor appointed by Barr poised to enter Washington firestorm MORE (D-Conn.), would block the administration from barring refugees based on what country they are from. 

"There’s no real danger to America from refugees who’ve gone through our vetting system and entered our country. The danger is that we help [the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria] recruit lone-wolf terrorists here at home by making clear that they have no place in our society. It’s up to Congress to fix this," Murphy said. 

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He added, "Trump’s refugee ban puts American lives at risk and it plays right into the hands of our enemies."

In addition to Murphy, Democratic Sens. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinOn The Money: GOP angst grows over Trump's trade war | Trump promises help for 'Patriot Farmers' | Markets rebound | CBO founding director Alice Rivlin dies | Senate to vote on disaster aid bill next week Senators offer bipartisan retirement savings bill Top Finance Dem offers bill to help those repaying student loans save for retirement MORE (Md.), Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyOvernight Energy: EPA watchdog finds Pruitt spent 4K on 'excessive' travel | Agency defends Pruitt expenses | Lawmakers push EPA to recover money | Inslee proposes spending T for green jobs Dems request investigation of lobbyist-turned-EPA employee who met with former boss This week: House to vote on bill to ban LGBTQ discrimination MORE (Ore.), Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenHirono electrifies left as Trump antagonist Miss USA pageant winner celebrated for addressing 'Me Too' movement on stage NY man sentenced to prison for racist death threats to Obama, Waters MORE (Minn.), Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyGOP senator announces bill to block companies from tracking online activity Trump faces criticism for hosting Hungary's leader Bill Nye tees off on climate change skeptics: 'The planet is on f---ing fire!' MORE (Mass.), Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenOn The Money: Judge upholds House subpoena for Trump financial records | Trump vows to appeal ruling by 'Obama-appointed judge' | Canada, Mexico lift retaliatory tariffs on US | IRS audit rate falls Mnuchin signals administration won't comply with subpoena for Trump tax returns Dem lawmakers urge FCC to scrutinize broadcast workforce diversity MORE (Md.), Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoSenate confirms Rosen for No. 2 spot at DOJ Alabama abortion law sparks fears Supreme Court may overturn Roe v. Wade The CASE Act is an opportunity for creators to have rights and remedies MORE (Hawaii) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Sanders pledges to only nominate Supreme Court justices that support Roe v. Wade From dive bars to steakhouses: How Iowa caucus staffers blow off steam MORE (N.J.) are co-sponsoring the legislation, according to the Congressional Record. 

The Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit late last month that was brought by the state of Hawaii challenging the 90-day travel ban on nationals from six majority-Muslim countries and the 120-day halt on the U.S. refugee resettlement program, claiming the case is now moot.

But an appeals court ruled on Monday that the government can bar entry to people from six majority-Muslim countries — Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen — who lack ties to the United States.

The Trump administration has also capped the number of refugees the United States will accept overall at 45,000 for the fiscal year 2018 fiscal year. 

This week's legislation isn't the first time Democrats have tried to reverse the administration's travel restrictions. 

Sixteen Democrats introduced legislation, spearheaded by Murphy, to undercut the order by withholding funding to enforce it in March. 

Democrats are unlikely to block Trump's order through legislation. They would need 60 votes to clear the Senate, which would require the support of at least a dozen GOP senators.