Senate Democrats introduce bill to block Trump's refugee ban
© Getty Images

Senate Democrats are renewing their efforts to block President Trump's refugee ban, arguing it is being used as a recruiting tool for terrorist groups. 

The legislation, spearheaded by Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyOcasio-Cortez knocks Pence: 'Utterly irresponsible to put him in charge of US coronavirus response' Lawmakers raise alarms over Trump coronavirus response Schumer: Trump coronavirus response marked by 'towering and dangerous incompetence' MORE (D-Conn.), would block the administration from barring refugees based on what country they are from. 

"There’s no real danger to America from refugees who’ve gone through our vetting system and entered our country. The danger is that we help [the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria] recruit lone-wolf terrorists here at home by making clear that they have no place in our society. It’s up to Congress to fix this," Murphy said. 

ADVERTISEMENT

He added, "Trump’s refugee ban puts American lives at risk and it plays right into the hands of our enemies."

In addition to Murphy, Democratic Sens. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinSchumer asks Justice Department to probe Grenell's consulting work Democrats worried about Trump's growing strength Senate Democrats queasy over Sanders as nominee MORE (Md.), Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyInterest rate caps are popular — for good reason Overnight Energy: EPA to regulate 'forever chemicals' in drinking water | Trump budget calls for slashing funds for climate science centers | House Dems urge banks not to fund drilling in Arctic refuge Democratic senators criticize plan that could expand Arctic oil and gas development MORE (Ore.), Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenAl Franken blasts Susan Collins: She'll let Trump 'get away with anything' Bill Press: Don't forget about Amy Key moments in the 2020 Democratic presidential race so far MORE (Minn.), Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyHillicon Valley — Presented by Facebook — Federal court rules tech giants can censor content | Trump upends surveillance fight | Senate passes bill barring federal funds for Huawei equipment Democrats hit Facebook over gun sales on platform Kennedy, Markey neck-and-neck in Massachusetts primary: poll MORE (Mass.), Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenOn The Money: Stocks plummet into correction over fears of coronavirus spreading | GOP resistance to Fed pick Shelton eases | Sanders offers bill to limit tax breaks for retiring executives Sanders offers bill taking aim at tax breaks for executive retirement plans Overnight Energy: EPA to regulate 'forever chemicals' in drinking water | Trump budget calls for slashing funds for climate science centers | House Dems urge banks not to fund drilling in Arctic refuge MORE (Md.), Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoDemocratic senators ask DOJ watchdog to expand Giuliani probe Senate Dems blast Barr for 'clear violation' of duty in Stone case, urge him to resign What the impeachment vote looked like from inside the chamber MORE (Hawaii) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Memo: Biden seeks revival in South Carolina Bloomberg campaign lobbied Yang for endorsement, possible VP offer: report Warren calls for changes to presidential pardon power, pledges to create clemency board MORE (N.J.) are co-sponsoring the legislation, according to the Congressional Record. 

The Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit late last month that was brought by the state of Hawaii challenging the 90-day travel ban on nationals from six majority-Muslim countries and the 120-day halt on the U.S. refugee resettlement program, claiming the case is now moot.

But an appeals court ruled on Monday that the government can bar entry to people from six majority-Muslim countries — Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen — who lack ties to the United States.

The Trump administration has also capped the number of refugees the United States will accept overall at 45,000 for the fiscal year 2018 fiscal year. 

This week's legislation isn't the first time Democrats have tried to reverse the administration's travel restrictions. 

Sixteen Democrats introduced legislation, spearheaded by Murphy, to undercut the order by withholding funding to enforce it in March. 

Democrats are unlikely to block Trump's order through legislation. They would need 60 votes to clear the Senate, which would require the support of at least a dozen GOP senators.