Senate Democrats introduce bill to block Trump's refugee ban
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Senate Democrats are renewing their efforts to block President Trump's refugee ban, arguing it is being used as a recruiting tool for terrorist groups. 

The legislation, spearheaded by Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyDem senator calls for US action after 'preposterous' Saudi explanation Saudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP Overnight Defense: Trump worries Saudi Arabia treated as 'guilty until proven innocent' | McConnell opens door to sanctions | Joint Chiefs chair to meet Saudi counterpart | Mattis says Trump backs him '100 percent' MORE (D-Conn.), would block the administration from barring refugees based on what country they are from. 

"There’s no real danger to America from refugees who’ve gone through our vetting system and entered our country. The danger is that we help [the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria] recruit lone-wolf terrorists here at home by making clear that they have no place in our society. It’s up to Congress to fix this," Murphy said. 

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He added, "Trump’s refugee ban puts American lives at risk and it plays right into the hands of our enemies."

In addition to Murphy, Democratic Sens. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinGOP leaders hesitant to challenge Trump on Saudi Arabia Dem senator: Trump accepts Saudi denials because he is 'enamored' with dictators Saudi mystery drives wedge between Trump, GOP MORE (Md.), Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleySanders, Harris set to criss-cross Iowa Dem senator calls for US action after 'preposterous' Saudi explanation Graham: Saudi’s findings on slain journalist not 'credible' MORE (Ore.), Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenGOP lawmaker once belittled sexual harassment: 'How traumatizing was it?' Meet the man poised to battle Dems from the White House Minnesota GOP Senate candidate compared Michelle Obama to a chimp in Facebook post MORE (Minn.), Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyElection Countdown: O'Rourke goes on the attack | Takeaways from fiery second Texas Senate debate | Heitkamp apologizes for ad misidentifying abuse victims | Trump Jr. to rally for Manchin challenger | Rick Scott leaves trail to deal with hurricane damage Senate Dems ask Trump to disclose financial ties to Saudi Arabia Dems damp down hopes for climate change agenda MORE (Mass.), Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenDem senator: 'Shameful' seeing Trump serve as 'mouthpiece' for Saudi leaders Overnight Defense: Trump says 'rogue killers' could be behind missing journalist | Sends Pompeo to meet Saudi king | Saudis may claim Khashoggi killed by accident | Ex-VA chief talks White House 'chaos' | Most F-35s cleared for flight Democrats torch Trump for floating 'rogue killers' to blame for missing journalist MORE (Md.), Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoKavanaugh tensions linger after bitter fight Chris Cuomo: Presumption of innocence didn't apply to Kavanaugh because it wasn't a court case Lindsey Graham hits Dem senator: 'The Hirono standard is horrific' MORE (Hawaii) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSanders, Harris set to criss-cross Iowa Election Countdown: Small-donor donations explode | Russian woman charged with midterm interference | Takeaways from North Dakota Senate debate | O'Rourke gives 'definitive no' to 2020 run | Dems hope Latino voters turn Arizona blue Kamala Harris rallies voters in South Carolina MORE (N.J.) are co-sponsoring the legislation, according to the Congressional Record. 

The Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit late last month that was brought by the state of Hawaii challenging the 90-day travel ban on nationals from six majority-Muslim countries and the 120-day halt on the U.S. refugee resettlement program, claiming the case is now moot.

But an appeals court ruled on Monday that the government can bar entry to people from six majority-Muslim countries — Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen — who lack ties to the United States.

The Trump administration has also capped the number of refugees the United States will accept overall at 45,000 for the fiscal year 2018 fiscal year. 

This week's legislation isn't the first time Democrats have tried to reverse the administration's travel restrictions. 

Sixteen Democrats introduced legislation, spearheaded by Murphy, to undercut the order by withholding funding to enforce it in March. 

Democrats are unlikely to block Trump's order through legislation. They would need 60 votes to clear the Senate, which would require the support of at least a dozen GOP senators.