The Senate lacks the votes to pass a House GOP spending bill.

Forty-two Democrats have come out in opposition to the measure, which is also facing opposition in the House.

Two Republicans also say they will vote against the bill, leaving it short of the 60 votes necessary to pass it if it can get through the lower chamber.

While it is possible that members could shift their positions, it definitely means the federal government is closer to a shutdown than it has been since a 16-day closure in 2013.

The government would shut down on Saturday without action by Congress. 

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The main issue for Democrats is that the bill is silent on providing shelter to hundreds of thousands of young immigrants protected from deportation by an Obama-era program that President TrumpDonald TrumpKushner lands book deal, slated for release in 2022 Biden moves to undo Trump trade legacy with EU deal Progressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC MORE is ending.

Immigration talks aimed at creating legislation to protect these people and to secure the border and change other immigration programs is at a stalemate.

Here’s a look at the positions of senators in both parties.

Most Republicans are expected to back the measure, while most Democrats are likely to oppose it unless it is changed.

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REPUBLICANS

No (2)

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamProgressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC Senate confirms Garland's successor to appeals court Progressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema MORE (S.C.): Graham, who supported the December stopgap, said on Wednesday that he would vote against this week’s bill because he’s tired of backing short-term measures that he says are hurting the military. “I don't want to shut the government down, but you know it's killing the military,” he said.

Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.): Paul said on Fox News that he would be a "no" vote. “So, I’ll be a 'no' vote because I’m not going to continue to put the country further into debt,” he said on the “Outnumbered Overtime” program on Thursday. 

 

Unclear (2)

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeOn The Trail: Arizona is microcosm of battle for the GOP Trump looms large over fractured Arizona GOP Why Republican politicians are sticking with Trump MORE (Ariz.): Flake, who has pressed for an immigration deal to be given a floor vote, declined to say if he would vote for the four-week spending bill.

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeBig Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC GOP senators press Justice Department to compare protest arrests to Capitol riot Matt Stoller says cheerleading industry shows why antitrust laws are 'insufficient' MORE (Utah): Lee hasn’t said how he will vote, but opposed both the September and December stopgap measures.

 

DEMOCRATS

Yes (4)

Sen. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyRepublicans fret over divisive candidates Everybody wants Joe Manchin Centrist Democrats pose major problem for progressives MORE (Ind.): Donnelly, one of several Democrats up for reelection in states won buy Trump, is voting yes. "I was elected by the people of Indiana to work every day on behalf of Hoosiers to do my job as a United States senator. Keeping government running is our job and I will vote to keep the government open," he said Friday. He also supported last month’s bill. Donnelly and other red-state Democrats probably face political risk if Democrats are blamed for a shutdown over immigration.

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.): Heitkamp is up for reelection in a deep-red state. On Friday, she said she would vote to keep the government open. “My vote to keep the government open is not an endorsement for a bill that just kicks the can down the road another few weeks,” said Heitkamp, who called on both parties to "find a long term solution to keep the government operating." She also voted in December to keep the government open.

Sen. Doug Jones (Ala.): Jones, who joined the Senate earlier this month after an upset in his deep-red state, told reporters Friday night that he would support the House measure, citing its funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinProgressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC US, EU pledge to work together on climate amid reported dissension on coal Senate to hold hearing on DC statehood bill MORE (W.Va.): Manchin said on Tuesday that he will support a stopgap without an immigration deal, adding “we’re trying to find [a deal] but shutting down the government is not going to help them.”

 

Undecided (3)

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBiden moves to undo Trump trade legacy with EU deal How Biden can get the infrastructure bill through Congress Democrats reintroduce bill to create 'millionaires surtax' MORE (Ohio): Brown, who is running for reelection in a state won by Trump, voted against the December bill. He declined to say this week how he would vote.

Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Jan. 6 commission vote delayed; infrastructure debate lingers into June Missouri Republicans move to block Greitens in key Senate race Democratic Kansas City, Mo., mayor eyes Senate run MORE (Mo.): McCaskill, also up for reelection in a state won by Trump, voted for the December bill but hasn’t indicated if she will support this week’s measure.

Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonDemings raises million after announcing Senate bid against Rubio Russia threatens to leave International Space Station program over US sanctions Nikki Fried, only statewide elected Democrat in Florida, launches challenge to DeSantis MORE (Fla.): Nelson, who is up for reelection in 2018, hasn’t said if he will support the CR, but voted for last month’s extension.

 

No or likely no (42):

Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinTo reverse the teaching shortage in low-income communities, give educators incentive to stay Senate Democrats offer bill to scrap tax break for investment managers Senate Democrats push Biden over raising refugee cap MORE (Wis.): Baldwin is up for reelection this year in a state narrowly won by Trump but voted against the Dec. 22 continuing resolution.

Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetPast criticism of Trump becomes potent weapon in GOP primaries Hillicon Valley: Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC | Lawmakers urge Biden to be tough on cyber during summit with Putin | TSA working on additional security regulations following Colonial Pipeline hack Senators introducing B bill to help narrow digital divide MORE (Colo.):  Bennet — part of a bipartisan group that negotiated a stalled immigration deal — voted against the December stopgap.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (Conn.): Blumenthal voted against the December stopgap bill.

Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerZombie Tax punishes farmers to fill DC coffers Rand Paul does not support a national minimum wage increase — and it's important to understand why Absences force Senate to punt vote on Biden nominee MORE (N.J.): Booker is one of several Democratic senators seen as possible candidates for president in 2020 who have taken firm positions against voting for another stopgap measure that doesn’t help the young immigrants known as "Dreamers."

Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellSenate Democrats threaten to block 2026 World Cup funds unless women's soccer team get equal pay Senate confirms Biden's top scientist Senate chaos: Johnson delays exit as votes pushed to Friday MORE (Wash.): Cantwell voted against last month’s funding bill.

Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden on Putin: 'a worthy adversary' Antsy Democrats warn of infrastructure time crunch 'SECURE 2.0' will modernize retirement security for the post-COVID American workforce MORE (Md.): Cardin voted against the December continuing resolution.

Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperThis week: Democrats face fractures in spending fight Progressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema Democrats wary of emerging bipartisan infrastructure deal MORE (Del.): Carper, who supported the last CR, told PBS that he will oppose the current bill.

Sen. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyMcConnell seeks to divide and conquer Democrats Senate filibuster fight throws Democrats' wish list into limbo Parliamentarian changes Senate calculus for Biden agenda MORE (Pa.): Casey, who is up for reelection in a state carried by Trump, voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Christopher Coons (Del.): Coons said that "at some point, Congress needs to do better than government-by-crisis, short-term fixes, and sidestepping difficult issues. That time is now."

Sen. Catherine Cortez MastoCatherine Marie Cortez MastoPast criticism of Trump becomes potent weapon in GOP primaries Infighting grips Nevada Democrats ahead of midterms Top union unveils national town hall strategy to push Biden's jobs plan MORE (Nev.): Cortez Masto opposed last month's bill.

Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthTaiwan reports incursion by dozens of Chinese warplanes Concerns grow over China's Taiwan plans China conducts amphibious landing drill near Taiwan after senators' visit MORE (Ill.): Duckworth voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinHarris calls for pathway to citizenship for Dreamers on DACA anniversary The Hill's Morning Report - Biden on Putin: 'a worthy adversary' McConnell sparks new Supreme Court fight MORE (Ill.): Durbin — part of the “Gang of Six” immigration deal — said he will oppose the CR without an immigration deal.

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinYouth climate activists march outside California homes of Pelosi and Feinstein Cosmetic chemicals need a makeover Progressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema MORE (Calif.): Feinstein, who is facing a primary challenge from the left, voted against last month’s funding bill.

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandCosmetic chemicals need a makeover Overnight Defense: Austin and Milley talk budget, Afghanistan, sexual assault and more at wide-ranging Senate hearing Top general: Military justice overhaul proposed by Gillibrand 'requires some detailed study' MORE (N.Y.): Gillibrand, one of the Democrats seen as having 2020 ambitions, said on Wednesday that “protecting Dreamers is a moral imperative. I will not vote for a spending bill that doesn’t treat Dreamers fairly.”

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisDemocrats learn hard truths about Capitol breach Harris calls for pathway to citizenship for Dreamers on DACA anniversary Abbott says he'll solicit public donations for border wall MORE (Calif.): Harris, another subject of 2020 speculation, voted against last month’s bill and has been adamant that she wouldn’t support funding without an immigration deal.

Sen. Maggie Hassan (N.H.): Hassan announced Thursday she would oppose a short-term measure after supporting the one passed by the Senate in December.

Sen. Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichFBI warns lawmakers of violence from QAnon conspiracy theorists Overnight Energy: Company officially nixes Keystone XL pipeline | Government watchdog finds failings, but no Trump influence, in clearing of Lafayette Square Democrats blast Biden climate adviser over infrastructure remarks MORE (N.M.): Heinrich, who supported last month’s bill, said he is “not willing to leave these bipartisan priorities behind and vote for a bill that gives President Trump and congressional Republicans more time to hold the country hostage.”

Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoDemocrats mull overhaul of sweeping election bill White House gets back to pre-COVID-19 normality Biden signs anti-Asian hate crimes bill into law MORE (Hawaii): Hirono voted against the December bill.

Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineThis week: Democrats face fractures in spending fight Democrats mull overhaul of sweeping election bill Overnight Defense: Pentagon details military construction projects getting .2B restored from wall funds | Biden chooses former commander to lead Navy | Bill seeks to boost visa program for Afghans who helped US MORE (Va.): Kaine and fellow Virginia Democratic senator Mark Warner on Thursday said they would oppose the House GOP stopgap.

Sen. Angus KingAngus KingHillicon Valley: Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC | Lawmakers urge Biden to be tough on cyber during summit with Putin | TSA working on additional security regulations following Colonial Pipeline hack Senate Armed Services member: Administration should have 'hair on fire' over Afghan interpreters Senators introducing B bill to help narrow digital divide MORE (I-Maine): King, who voted for the stopgap in December, told CNN on Thursday that “I think we’ve got to close this escape hatch, stop voting for CRs, and tell the leadership they’re going to have to make their deals, and then we’ll get it done.”

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC | Lawmakers urge Biden to be tough on cyber during summit with Putin | TSA working on additional security regulations following Colonial Pipeline hack Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC Senate confirms Lina Khan to the FTC MORE (Minn.): Klobuchar voted against last month’s stopgap.

Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyBipartisan lawmakers want Biden to take tougher action on Nicaragua Biden budget expands government's role in economy House narrowly approves .9B Capitol security bill after 'squad' drama MORE (Vt.): Leahy, who supported last month’s stopgap, said this week that he will oppose the new bill.

Sen. Ed MarkeyEd MarkeySenate passes bill to make Juneteenth a federal holiday Overnight Energy: Schumer to trigger reconciliation process Wednesday | Bipartisan bill would ban 'forever chemicals' in cosmetics | Biden admin eyes step toward Trump-era proposal for uranium reserve Progressives threaten to block bipartisan infrastructure proposal MORE (Mass.): Markey voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden-Putin meeting to dominate the week Sanders drops bid to block Biden's Israel arms sale Sanders push to block arms sale to Israel doomed in Senate MORE (N.J.): Menendez — who helped craft a bipartisan immigration deal — voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyOvernight Energy: Schumer to trigger reconciliation process Wednesday | Bipartisan bill would ban 'forever chemicals' in cosmetics | Biden admin eyes step toward Trump-era proposal for uranium reserve Progressives threaten to block bipartisan infrastructure proposal Youth climate activists march outside California homes of Pelosi and Feinstein MORE (Ore.): Merkley voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyBipartisan infrastructure deal takes fire from left and right Democrats mull overhaul of sweeping election bill Rising crime rejuvenates gun control debate on campaign trail MORE (Conn.): Murphy voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurraySenate GOP blocks bill to combat gender pay gap OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden suspends Arctic oil leases issued under Trump |  Experts warn US needs to better prepare for hurricane season | Progressives set sights on Civilian Climate Corps Progressives set sights on Civilian Climate Corps program: exclusive MORE (Wash.): Murray voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Gary Peters (Mich.): Peters, who supported last month’s bill, will vote against this week's measure, according to the Detroit Free Press.

Sen. Jack ReedJack ReedOvernight Defense: Pentagon details military construction projects getting .2B restored from wall funds | Biden chooses former commander to lead Navy | Bill seeks to boost visa program for Afghans who helped US Biden taps tech CEO, former destroyer commander to lead Navy Top general: Military justice overhaul proposed by Gillibrand 'requires some detailed study' MORE (R.I.): Reed voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersProgressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC Zombie Tax punishes farmers to fill DC coffers Progressives threaten to block bipartisan infrastructure proposal MORE (I-Vt.): The 2016 Democratic presidential primary runner-up voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzDemocrats blast Biden climate adviser over infrastructure remarks Parliamentarian changes Senate calculus for Biden agenda Senate climate advocates start digging in on infrastructure goals MORE (Hawaii): Schatz voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Charles SchumerChuck SchumerOvernight Energy: Schumer to trigger reconciliation process Wednesday | Bipartisan bill would ban 'forever chemicals' in cosmetics | Biden admin eyes step toward Trump-era proposal for uranium reserve GOP senator: I want to make Biden a 'one-half-term president' How Biden can get the infrastructure bill through Congress MORE (N.Y.): The Senate Democratic leader called the bill a “loser” and warned that his caucus is broadly opposed to the measure.

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenCosmetic chemicals need a makeover How Biden can get the infrastructure bill through Congress Pelosi: 'No intention' of abandoning Democrats' infrastructure goals MORE (N.H.): Shaheen, who voted for the December bill, said she would vote against the new short-term bill, calling it “no way to run a government.”

Sen. Tina Smith (Minn.): Smith, who joined the Senate last month, said Thursday she would vote against the short-term bill.

Sen. Debbie Stabenow (Mich.): Stabenow, a member of Democratic leadership who is up for reelection in a state won by Trump, will vote against the bill, according to the Detroit Free Press. She backed the December bill.

Sen. Jon Tester (Mont.): Tester, who is up for reelection in a state won by Trump, wrote on Medium that "the short-term — take-it-or-leave-it — budget bill before Congress right now is a disgrace. ... It’s a failure of leadership and I’m here today to say, no more. Not on my watch." 

Sen. Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenZombie Tax punishes farmers to fill DC coffers Democrats face new pressure to raise taxes Democrats reintroduce bill to create 'millionaires surtax' MORE (Md.): Van Hollen, the chairman of the Senate Democratic campaign arm, opposed last month’s bill.

Sen. Tom UdallTom UdallSenate Democrats befuddled by Joe Manchin Study: Chemical used in paint thinners caused more deaths than EPA identified Oregon senator takes center stage in Democratic filibuster debate MORE (N.M.): Udall said in a statement that “President Trump and the Republicans have a choice: They can either come to the table and negotiate in good faith on a responsible funding agreement and protection for DREAMers — or they can cause a government shutdown.”

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenProgressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC On The Money: Schumer to trigger reconciliation process on Wednesday | Four states emerge as test case for cutting off jobless benefits Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC MORE (Mass.): The liberal favorite and possible presidential candidate in 2020 opposed last month’s bill.

Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseZombie Tax punishes farmers to fill DC coffers Progressives threaten to block bipartisan infrastructure proposal This week: Democrats face fractures in spending fight MORE (R.I.): Whitehouse opposed last month’s bill.

Sen. Mark Warner (Va.): Along with fellow Virginia Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine, Warner said Thursday he would oppose the House GOP bill.

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenFour states emerge as test case for cutting off jobless benefits Democrats face new pressure to raise taxes Hydrogen isn't as clean as it seems MORE (Ore.): Wyden said that he will “vote NO on a spending bill that fails to protect children at every turn and does not permanently protect Dreamers in Oregon and across the country.”