The Senate lacks the votes to pass a House GOP spending bill.

Forty-two Democrats have come out in opposition to the measure, which is also facing opposition in the House.

Two Republicans also say they will vote against the bill, leaving it short of the 60 votes necessary to pass it if it can get through the lower chamber.

While it is possible that members could shift their positions, it definitely means the federal government is closer to a shutdown than it has been since a 16-day closure in 2013.

The government would shut down on Saturday without action by Congress. 

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The main issue for Democrats is that the bill is silent on providing shelter to hundreds of thousands of young immigrants protected from deportation by an Obama-era program that President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump admin to announce coronavirus vaccine will be covered under Medicare, Medicaid: report Election officials say they're getting suspicious emails that may be part of malicious attack on voting: report McConnell tees up Trump judicial pick following Supreme Court vote MORE is ending.

Immigration talks aimed at creating legislation to protect these people and to secure the border and change other immigration programs is at a stalemate.

Here’s a look at the positions of senators in both parties.

Most Republicans are expected to back the measure, while most Democrats are likely to oppose it unless it is changed.

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REPUBLICANS

No (2)

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP Senate confirms Trump Supreme Court pick to succeed Ginsburg Murkowski predicts Barrett won't overturn Roe v. Wade Biden seeks to close any path for Trump win in race's final days MORE (S.C.): Graham, who supported the December stopgap, said on Wednesday that he would vote against this week’s bill because he’s tired of backing short-term measures that he says are hurting the military. “I don't want to shut the government down, but you know it's killing the military,” he said.

Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.): Paul said on Fox News that he would be a "no" vote. “So, I’ll be a 'no' vote because I’m not going to continue to put the country further into debt,” he said on the “Outnumbered Overtime” program on Thursday. 

 

Unclear (2)

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeOne of life's great mysteries: Why would any conservative vote for Biden? Trump excoriates Sasse over leaked audio Biden holds 8-point lead over Trump in Arizona: poll MORE (Ariz.): Flake, who has pressed for an immigration deal to be given a floor vote, declined to say if he would vote for the four-week spending bill.

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeWhite House to host swearing-in event for Barrett on Monday night Pence adviser Marty Obst tests positive for COVID-19 Two Loeffler staffers test positive for COVID-19 MORE (Utah): Lee hasn’t said how he will vote, but opposed both the September and December stopgap measures.

 

DEMOCRATS

Yes (4)

Sen. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyBiden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big Harris walks fine line on Barrett as election nears The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by JobsOhio - Showdown: Trump-Biden debate likely to be nasty MORE (Ind.): Donnelly, one of several Democrats up for reelection in states won buy Trump, is voting yes. "I was elected by the people of Indiana to work every day on behalf of Hoosiers to do my job as a United States senator. Keeping government running is our job and I will vote to keep the government open," he said Friday. He also supported last month’s bill. Donnelly and other red-state Democrats probably face political risk if Democrats are blamed for a shutdown over immigration.

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.): Heitkamp is up for reelection in a deep-red state. On Friday, she said she would vote to keep the government open. “My vote to keep the government open is not an endorsement for a bill that just kicks the can down the road another few weeks,” said Heitkamp, who called on both parties to "find a long term solution to keep the government operating." She also voted in December to keep the government open.

Sen. Doug Jones (Ala.): Jones, who joined the Senate earlier this month after an upset in his deep-red state, told reporters Friday night that he would support the House measure, citing its funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinDemocratic Senate emerges as possible hurdle for progressives  Susan Collins and the American legacy Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein MORE (W.Va.): Manchin said on Tuesday that he will support a stopgap without an immigration deal, adding “we’re trying to find [a deal] but shutting down the government is not going to help them.”

 

Undecided (3)

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBrown says Biden's first moves as president should be COVID relief, voting rights Senators battle over Supreme Court nominee in rare Saturday session Sunday shows preview: Trump, Biden gear up for final sprint to Election Day MORE (Ohio): Brown, who is running for reelection in a state won by Trump, voted against the December bill. He declined to say this week how he would vote.

Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillBiden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big Harris walks fine line on Barrett as election nears Fox's Bongino, MSNBC's McCaskill trade blows over Trump ride: 'You epic piece of garbage' MORE (Mo.): McCaskill, also up for reelection in a state won by Trump, voted for the December bill but hasn’t indicated if she will support this week’s measure.

Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonSenate Democrats want to avoid Kavanaugh 2.0 Democrats sound alarm on possible election chaos Trump, facing trouble in Florida, goes all in MORE (Fla.): Nelson, who is up for reelection in 2018, hasn’t said if he will support the CR, but voted for last month’s extension.

 

No or likely no (42):

Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinInfrastructure, energy investments urgently needed to create U.S. jobs Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing Baldwin calls for Senate hearing on CDC response to meatpacking plant coronavirus outbreak MORE (Wis.): Baldwin is up for reelection this year in a state narrowly won by Trump but voted against the Dec. 22 continuing resolution.

Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetSenate Democrats hold talkathon to protest Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Cotton mocks NY Times over claim of nonpartisanship, promises to submit op-eds as test Democrats sense momentum for expanding child tax credit MORE (Colo.):  Bennet — part of a bipartisan group that negotiated a stalled immigration deal — voted against the December stopgap.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (Conn.): Blumenthal voted against the December stopgap bill.

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDemocratic senators unveil bill to ban discrimination in financial services industry Obama endorses Espy in Mississippi Senate race Durbin says he will run for No. 2 spot if Dems win Senate majority MORE (N.J.): Booker is one of several Democratic senators seen as possible candidates for president in 2020 who have taken firm positions against voting for another stopgap measure that doesn’t help the young immigrants known as "Dreamers."

Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellDemocrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein Hillicon Valley: Senate panel votes to subpoena Big Tech executives | Amazon says over 19,000 workers tested positive for COVID-19 | Democrats demand DHS release report warning of election interference Senate panel votes to subpoena Big Tech executives MORE (Wash.): Cantwell voted against last month’s funding bill.

Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinBipartisan group of senators call on Trump to sanction Russia over Navalny poisoning Pelosi hopeful COVID-19 relief talks resume 'soon' Congress must finish work on popular conservation bill before time runs out MORE (Md.): Cardin voted against the December continuing resolution.

Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Democrats allege EPA plans to withhold funding from 'anarchist' cities | Montana asks court to throw out major public lands decisions after ousting BLM director | It's unknown if fee reductions given to oil producers prevented shutdowns Democrats allege EPA plans to withhold funding from 'anarchist' cities Energy innovation bill can deliver jobs and climate progress MORE (Del.): Carper, who supported the last CR, told PBS that he will oppose the current bill.

Sen. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseySenate Democrats hold talkathon to protest Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Two Loeffler staffers test positive for COVID-19 Healthcare, retirement security seen as top issues for older voters, lawmakers say MORE (Pa.): Casey, who is up for reelection in a state carried by Trump, voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Christopher Coons (Del.): Coons said that "at some point, Congress needs to do better than government-by-crisis, short-term fixes, and sidestepping difficult issues. That time is now."

Sen. Catherine Cortez MastoCatherine Marie Cortez MastoCortez Masto's public lands giveaway greenwash Democratic Senate campaign arm outraises GOP counterpart in September Hillicon Valley: DOJ proposes tech liability shield reform to Congress | Treasury sanctions individuals, groups tied to Russian malign influence activities | House Republican introduces bill to set standards for self-driving cars MORE (Nev.): Cortez Masto opposed last month's bill.

Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthAmy Coney Barrett's extreme views put women's rights in jeopardy Trump slight against Gold Star families adds to military woes McConnell focuses on confirming judicial nominees with COVID-19 talks stalled MORE (Ill.): Duckworth voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocrats warn GOP will regret Barrett confirmation Democrats brace for nail-biting finish to Senate battle Democratic Senate emerges as possible hurdle for progressives  MORE (Ill.): Durbin — part of the “Gang of Six” immigration deal — said he will oppose the CR without an immigration deal.

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinMurkowski predicts Barrett won't overturn Roe v. Wade Democrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination The Senate should evoke RBG in its confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett MORE (Calif.): Feinstein, who is facing a primary challenge from the left, voted against last month’s funding bill.

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandInternal Democratic poll: Desiree Tims gains on Mike Turner in Ohio House race Hillicon Valley: Facebook, Twitter's handling of New York Post article raises election night concerns | FCC to move forward with considering order targeting tech's liability shield | YouTube expands polices to tackle QAnon Democrats question Amazon over reported interference of workers' rights to organize MORE (N.Y.): Gillibrand, one of the Democrats seen as having 2020 ambitions, said on Wednesday that “protecting Dreamers is a moral imperative. I will not vote for a spending bill that doesn’t treat Dreamers fairly.”

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHarris blasts GOP for confirming Amy Coney Barrett: 'We won't forget this' GOP Senate confirms Trump Supreme Court pick to succeed Ginsburg The painstaking, state-by-state fight to protect abortion access MORE (Calif.): Harris, another subject of 2020 speculation, voted against last month’s bill and has been adamant that she wouldn’t support funding without an immigration deal.

Sen. Maggie Hassan (N.H.): Hassan announced Thursday she would oppose a short-term measure after supporting the one passed by the Senate in December.

Sen. Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichSenate Democrats demand White House fire controversial head of public lands agency Senate Democrats seek removal of controversial public lands head after nomination withdrawal Five takeaways from final Senate Intel Russia report MORE (N.M.): Heinrich, who supported last month’s bill, said he is “not willing to leave these bipartisan priorities behind and vote for a bill that gives President Trump and congressional Republicans more time to hold the country hostage.”

Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoSenate Democrats hold talkathon to protest Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Durbin says he will run for No. 2 spot if Dems win Senate majority Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein MORE (Hawaii): Hirono voted against the December bill.

Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocratic Senate emerges as possible hurdle for progressives  Two Loeffler staffers test positive for COVID-19 Democrats have no case against Amy Coney Barrett — but that won't stop them MORE (Va.): Kaine and fellow Virginia Democratic senator Mark Warner on Thursday said they would oppose the House GOP stopgap.

Sen. Angus KingAngus KingSenate Democrats hold talkathon to protest Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Democratic Senate emerges as possible hurdle for progressives  Collins says running as Independent 'crossed my mind' MORE (I-Maine): King, who voted for the stopgap in December, told CNN on Thursday that “I think we’ve got to close this escape hatch, stop voting for CRs, and tell the leadership they’re going to have to make their deals, and then we’ll get it done.”

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharStart focusing on veterans' health before they enlist Durbin says he will run for No. 2 spot if Dems win Senate majority Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein MORE (Minn.): Klobuchar voted against last month’s stopgap.

Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahySchumer says he had 'serious talk' with Feinstein, declines to comment on Judiciary role Durbin says he will run for No. 2 spot if Dems win Senate majority Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein MORE (Vt.): Leahy, who supported last month’s stopgap, said this week that he will oppose the new bill.

Sen. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyOcasio-Cortez says having Green New Deal would have helped handle COVID-19 pandemic OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Democrats push expansion of offshore wind, block offshore drilling with ocean energy bill | Poll: Two-thirds of voters support Biden climate plan | Biden plan lags Green New Deal in fighting emissions from homes Biden plan lags Green New Deal in fighting emissions from homes MORE (Mass.): Markey voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezSenate Democrats hold talkathon to protest Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Watchdog confirms State Dept. canceled award for journalist who criticized Trump Kasie Hunt to host lead-in show for MSNBC's 'Morning Joe' MORE (N.J.): Menendez — who helped craft a bipartisan immigration deal — voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyGOP clears key hurdle on Barrett's Supreme Court nomination, setting up Monday confirmation Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - Trump, Biden renew push for Latino support MORE (Ore.): Merkley voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphySenate Democrats hold talkathon to protest Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Murphy says US would be 'better off' if Trump admin 'did nothing' on coronavirus Democratic Senate emerges as possible hurdle for progressives  MORE (Conn.): Murphy voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayPlaintiff and defendant from Obergefell v. Hodges unite to oppose Barrett's confirmation Overnight Health Care: Trump takes criticism of Fauci to a new level | GOP Health Committee chairman defends Fauci | Birx confronted Pence about Atlas Government watchdog to investigate allegations of Trump interference at CDC, FDA MORE (Wash.): Murray voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Gary Peters (Mich.): Peters, who supported last month’s bill, will vote against this week's measure, according to the Detroit Free Press.

Sen. Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedSenate Democrats hold talkathon to protest Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Overnight Defense: Armed Services chairman unsold on slashing defense budget | Democratic Senate report details 'damage, chaos' of Trump foreign policy | Administration approves .8B Taiwan arms sales Overnight Defense: Famed Navy SEAL calls Trump out | Yemen's Houthi rebels free two Americans | Marines fire commander after deadly training accident MORE (R.I.): Reed voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersObama book excerpt: 'Hard to deny my overconfidence' during early health care discussions Americans have a choice: Socialized medicine or health care freedom Ocasio-Cortez says Democrats must focus on winning White House for Biden MORE (I-Vt.): The 2016 Democratic presidential primary runner-up voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzSenate Democrats hold talkathon to protest Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Coordinated federal leadership is needed for recovery of US travel and tourism Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing MORE (Hawaii): Schatz voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Charles SchumerChuck SchumerGraham dismisses criticism from Fox Business's Lou Dobbs Lewandowski: Trump 'wants to see every Republican reelected regardless of ... if they break with the president' Democratic Senate emerges as possible hurdle for progressives  MORE (N.Y.): The Senate Democratic leader called the bill a “loser” and warned that his caucus is broadly opposed to the measure.

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenTrump makes rare campaign stops in New England in closing stretch GOP coronavirus bill blocked as deal remains elusive Justice indicts two members of ISIS 'Beatles' cell MORE (N.H.): Shaheen, who voted for the December bill, said she would vote against the new short-term bill, calling it “no way to run a government.”

Sen. Tina Smith (Minn.): Smith, who joined the Senate last month, said Thursday she would vote against the short-term bill.

Sen. Debbie Stabenow (Mich.): Stabenow, a member of Democratic leadership who is up for reelection in a state won by Trump, will vote against the bill, according to the Detroit Free Press. She backed the December bill.

Sen. Jon Tester (Mont.): Tester, who is up for reelection in a state won by Trump, wrote on Medium that "the short-term — take-it-or-leave-it — budget bill before Congress right now is a disgrace. ... It’s a failure of leadership and I’m here today to say, no more. Not on my watch." 

Sen. Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenDemocratic senators unveil bill to ban discrimination in financial services industry Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing Democratic senators offer bill to make payroll tax deferral optional for federal workers MORE (Md.): Van Hollen, the chairman of the Senate Democratic campaign arm, opposed last month’s bill.

Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Judge tosses land management plans after ousting Pendley from role | Trump says he could out-raise Biden with calls to Wall Street, oil execs | Supreme Court to review Trump border wall funding, asylum policies OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Pendley says court decision ousting him from BLM has had 'no impact' | Court strikes down Obama-era rule targeting methane leaks from public lands drilling | Feds sued over no longer allowing polluters to pay for environmental projects  Pendley says court decision ousting him from BLM has had 'no impact' MORE (N.M.): Udall said in a statement that “President Trump and the Republicans have a choice: They can either come to the table and negotiate in good faith on a responsible funding agreement and protection for DREAMers — or they can cause a government shutdown.”

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenAll fracked up: Biden's Keystone State breakdown What do Google, banks and chicken salad have in common? Final debate: War Admiral vs. Seabiscuit MORE (Mass.): The liberal favorite and possible presidential candidate in 2020 opposed last month’s bill.

Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseDemocrats warn GOP will regret Barrett confirmation GOP Senate confirms Trump Supreme Court pick to succeed Ginsburg Senators battle over Supreme Court nominee in rare Saturday session MORE (R.I.): Whitehouse opposed last month’s bill.

Sen. Mark Warner (Va.): Along with fellow Virginia Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine, Warner said Thursday he would oppose the House GOP bill.

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenPlaintiff and defendant from Obergefell v. Hodges unite to oppose Barrett's confirmation Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing House Democrats slam FCC chairman over 'blatant attempt to help' Trump MORE (Ore.): Wyden said that he will “vote NO on a spending bill that fails to protect children at every turn and does not permanently protect Dreamers in Oregon and across the country.”