The Senate lacks the votes to pass a House GOP spending bill.

Forty-two Democrats have come out in opposition to the measure, which is also facing opposition in the House.

Two Republicans also say they will vote against the bill, leaving it short of the 60 votes necessary to pass it if it can get through the lower chamber.

While it is possible that members could shift their positions, it definitely means the federal government is closer to a shutdown than it has been since a 16-day closure in 2013.

The government would shut down on Saturday without action by Congress. 

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The main issue for Democrats is that the bill is silent on providing shelter to hundreds of thousands of young immigrants protected from deportation by an Obama-era program that President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says GOP senators have called to congratulate him Biden: Trump attending inauguration is 'of consequence' to the country Biden says family will avoid business conflicts MORE is ending.

Immigration talks aimed at creating legislation to protect these people and to secure the border and change other immigration programs is at a stalemate.

Here’s a look at the positions of senators in both parties.

Most Republicans are expected to back the measure, while most Democrats are likely to oppose it unless it is changed.

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REPUBLICANS

No (2)

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamBiden: Trump attending inauguration is 'of consequence' to the country The Memo: Harris moves signal broad role as VP Former US attorney asks for probe of allegations Graham pressured Georgia official MORE (S.C.): Graham, who supported the December stopgap, said on Wednesday that he would vote against this week’s bill because he’s tired of backing short-term measures that he says are hurting the military. “I don't want to shut the government down, but you know it's killing the military,” he said.

Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.): Paul said on Fox News that he would be a "no" vote. “So, I’ll be a 'no' vote because I’m not going to continue to put the country further into debt,” he said on the “Outnumbered Overtime” program on Thursday. 

 

Unclear (2)

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeBiden eyeing Cindy McCain for UK ambassador position: report Profiles in cowardice: Trump's Senate enablers McSally concedes Arizona Senate race MORE (Ariz.): Flake, who has pressed for an immigration deal to be given a floor vote, declined to say if he would vote for the four-week spending bill.

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeGovernment used Patriot Act to gather website visitor logs in 2019 Grassley returns to Capitol after having coronavirus McConnell halts in-person Republican lunches amid COVID-19 surge MORE (Utah): Lee hasn’t said how he will vote, but opposed both the September and December stopgap measures.

 

DEMOCRATS

Yes (4)

Sen. Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyBiden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big Harris walks fine line on Barrett as election nears The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by JobsOhio - Showdown: Trump-Biden debate likely to be nasty MORE (Ind.): Donnelly, one of several Democrats up for reelection in states won buy Trump, is voting yes. "I was elected by the people of Indiana to work every day on behalf of Hoosiers to do my job as a United States senator. Keeping government running is our job and I will vote to keep the government open," he said Friday. He also supported last month’s bill. Donnelly and other red-state Democrats probably face political risk if Democrats are blamed for a shutdown over immigration.

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.): Heitkamp is up for reelection in a deep-red state. On Friday, she said she would vote to keep the government open. “My vote to keep the government open is not an endorsement for a bill that just kicks the can down the road another few weeks,” said Heitkamp, who called on both parties to "find a long term solution to keep the government operating." She also voted in December to keep the government open.

Sen. Doug Jones (Ala.): Jones, who joined the Senate earlier this month after an upset in his deep-red state, told reporters Friday night that he would support the House measure, citing its funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSmall businesses don't need another stimulus — they need customers Congress faces late-year logjam Funding bill hits snag as shutdown deadline looms MORE (W.Va.): Manchin said on Tuesday that he will support a stopgap without an immigration deal, adding “we’re trying to find [a deal] but shutting down the government is not going to help them.”

 

Undecided (3)

Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownACLU sues DHS for records on purchased cell phone data to track immigrants DHS watchdog to probe agency's tracking of Americans' phone data without a warrant Rare Mnuchin-Powell spat takes center stage at COVID-19 hearing MORE (Ohio): Brown, who is running for reelection in a state won by Trump, voted against the December bill. He declined to say this week how he would vote.

Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillMcCaskill: 'Hypocrisy' for GOP to target Biden nominee's tweets after Trump Democrats must turn around Utah police arrest man driving 130 mph claiming he was going to kill former Missouri senator MORE (Mo.): McCaskill, also up for reelection in a state won by Trump, voted for the December bill but hasn’t indicated if she will support this week’s measure.

Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonThe Hill's Morning Report - Fearing defeat, Trump claims 'illegal' ballots The Hill's Morning Report - Biden inches closer to victory Senate Democrats want to avoid Kavanaugh 2.0 MORE (Fla.): Nelson, who is up for reelection in 2018, hasn’t said if he will support the CR, but voted for last month’s extension.

 

No or likely no (42):

Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinSenate Democrats reelect Schumer as leader by acclamation  Next Congress expected to have record diversity Infrastructure, energy investments urgently needed to create U.S. jobs MORE (Wis.): Baldwin is up for reelection this year in a state narrowly won by Trump but voted against the Dec. 22 continuing resolution.

Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetHarris taps women of color for key senior staff positions The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - GOP angst in Georgia; confirmation fight looms Overnight Health Care: Moderna to apply for emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine candidate | Hospitals brace for COVID-19 surge | US more than doubles highest number of monthly COVID-19 cases MORE (Colo.):  Bennet — part of a bipartisan group that negotiated a stalled immigration deal — voted against the December stopgap.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (Conn.): Blumenthal voted against the December stopgap bill.

Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerJudge whose son was killed by gunman: 'Federal judiciary is under attack' Biden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate Policy center calls for new lawmakers to make diverse hires MORE (N.J.): Booker is one of several Democratic senators seen as possible candidates for president in 2020 who have taken firm positions against voting for another stopgap measure that doesn’t help the young immigrants known as "Dreamers."

Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellTwo more parting shots from Trump aimed squarely at disabled workers Senate advances energy regulator nominees despite uncertainty of floor vote OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Esper reportedly working with lawmakers to strip Confederate names from bases | Enemy attacks in Afghanistan jump by 50 percent, watchdog says | Fort Hood soldier arrested, charged in Chelsea Cheatham killing MORE (Wash.): Cantwell voted against last month’s funding bill.

Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinDemocratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry On The Money: Biden, Democratic leaders push for lame-duck coronavirus deal | Business groups shudder at Sanders as Labor secretary | Congress could pass retirement bill as soon as this year Top Democrat: Congress could pass retirement bill as soon as this year MORE (Md.): Cardin voted against the December continuing resolution.

Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Kerry says Paris climate deal alone 'is not enough' | EPA halts planned Taiwan trip for Wheeler| EPA sued over rule extending life of toxic coal ash ponds Overnight Energy: Biden names John Kerry as 'climate czar' | GM reverses on Trump, exits suit challenging California's tougher emissions standards | United Nations agency says greenhouse gas emissions accumulating despite lockdown decline GSA transition delay 'poses serious risk' to Native Americans, Udall says MORE (Del.): Carper, who supported the last CR, told PBS that he will oppose the current bill.

Sen. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyScranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Grassley tests positive for coronavirus Casey says he isn't thinking about Pennsylvania gubernatorial bid in 2022 MORE (Pa.): Casey, who is up for reelection in a state carried by Trump, voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Christopher Coons (Del.): Coons said that "at some point, Congress needs to do better than government-by-crisis, short-term fixes, and sidestepping difficult issues. That time is now."

Sen. Catherine Cortez MastoCatherine Marie Cortez MastoSenate committee approves nominations of three FEC commissioners Hispanic leaders coalesce in support of Lujan Grisham as HHS secretary Favorites emerge as Latino leaders press Biden to appoint 5 Hispanics to Cabinet MORE (Nev.): Cortez Masto opposed last month's bill.

Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthOvernight Defense: Trump orders troop drawdown in Afghanistan and Iraq | Key Republicans call Trump plan a 'mistake' Top Democrat calls Trump's Afghan drawdown 'the right policy decision' as others warn of 'mistake' Overnight Defense: Another Defense official resigns | Pentagon chief says military 'remains strong' despite purge | Top contender for Biden DOD secretary would be historic pick MORE (Ill.): Duckworth voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinCongress faces late-year logjam Funding bill hits snag as shutdown deadline looms Criminal justice groups offer support for Durbin amid fight for Judiciary spot MORE (Ill.): Durbin — part of the “Gang of Six” immigration deal — said he will oppose the CR without an immigration deal.

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinFeinstein pushes for California secretary of state to replace Harris in Senate The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Dem leaders back smaller COVID-19 relief bill as pandemic escalates Criminal justice groups offer support for Durbin amid fight for Judiciary spot MORE (Calif.): Feinstein, who is facing a primary challenge from the left, voted against last month’s funding bill.

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandOvernight Defense: Defense bill among Congress's year-end scramble | Iranian scientist's assassination adds hurdles to Biden's plan on nuclear deal | Navy scrapping USS Bonhomme Richard after fire Democratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Social media responds to Harris making history: 'I feel like our ancestors are rejoicing' MORE (N.Y.): Gillibrand, one of the Democrats seen as having 2020 ambitions, said on Wednesday that “protecting Dreamers is a moral imperative. I will not vote for a spending bill that doesn’t treat Dreamers fairly.”

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisBiden says GOP senators have called to congratulate him Biden says family will avoid business conflicts Biden says China must play by 'international norms' MORE (Calif.): Harris, another subject of 2020 speculation, voted against last month’s bill and has been adamant that she wouldn’t support funding without an immigration deal.

Sen. Maggie Hassan (N.H.): Hassan announced Thursday she would oppose a short-term measure after supporting the one passed by the Senate in December.

Sen. Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichHispanic caucus unhappy with transition team treatment of Lujan Grisham Progressives urge Haaland for Interior as short list grows Haaland has competition to be first Native American to lead Interior  MORE (N.M.): Heinrich, who supported last month’s bill, said he is “not willing to leave these bipartisan priorities behind and vote for a bill that gives President Trump and congressional Republicans more time to hold the country hostage.”

Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoHillicon Valley: YouTube suspends OANN amid lawmaker pressure | Dems probe Facebook, Twitter over Georgia runoff | FCC reaffirms ZTE's national security risk Democrats urge YouTube to remove election misinformation, step up efforts ahead of Georgia runoff YouTube temporarily suspends OANN account after spreading coronavirus misinformation MORE (Hawaii): Hirono voted against the December bill.

Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Defense: Lawmakers release compromise defense bill in defiance of Trump veto threat | Senate voting next week on blocking UAE arms sale | Report faults lack of training, 'chronic fatigue' in military plane crashes Senate to vote next week on blocking Trump's UAE arms sale Congress set for chaotic year-end sprint MORE (Va.): Kaine and fellow Virginia Democratic senator Mark Warner on Thursday said they would oppose the House GOP stopgap.

Sen. Angus KingAngus KingHillicon Valley: Government used Patriot Act to gather website visitor logs in 2019 | Defense bill leaves out Section 230 repeal, includes White House cyber czar position | Officials warn hackers are targeting vaccine supply chain Defense policy bill would create new cyber czar position Leadership changes at top cyber agency raise national security concerns MORE (I-Maine): King, who voted for the stopgap in December, told CNN on Thursday that “I think we’ve got to close this escape hatch, stop voting for CRs, and tell the leadership they’re going to have to make their deals, and then we’ll get it done.”

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharSenate committee approves nominations of three FEC commissioners Scammers step up efforts to target older Americans during pandemic Hillicon Valley: YouTube suspends OANN amid lawmaker pressure | Dems probe Facebook, Twitter over Georgia runoff | FCC reaffirms ZTE's national security risk MORE (Minn.): Klobuchar voted against last month’s stopgap.

Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyGovernment used Patriot Act to gather website visitor logs in 2019 Top GOP senator warns government funding deal unlikely this week Incoming Congress looks more like America MORE (Vt.): Leahy, who supported last month’s stopgap, said this week that he will oppose the new bill.

Sen. Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyACLU sues DHS for records on purchased cell phone data to track immigrants DHS watchdog to probe agency's tracking of Americans' phone data without a warrant Manchin: Ocasio-Cortez 'more active on Twitter than anything else' MORE (Mass.): Markey voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezSenate to vote next week on blocking Trump's UAE arms sale Judge whose son was killed by gunman: 'Federal judiciary is under attack' Emergency housing assistance for older adults needed now MORE (N.J.): Menendez — who helped craft a bipartisan immigration deal — voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyDemocrats introduce legislation to strike slavery exception in 13th Amendment Overnight Defense: Defense bill among Congress's year-end scramble | Iranian scientist's assassination adds hurdles to Biden's plan on nuclear deal | Navy scrapping USS Bonhomme Richard after fire Supreme Court declines to hear case challenging unlimited super PAC fundraising MORE (Ore.): Merkley voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyOvernight Defense: Lawmakers release compromise defense bill in defiance of Trump veto threat | Senate voting next week on blocking UAE arms sale | Report faults lack of training, 'chronic fatigue' in military plane crashes Senate to vote next week on blocking Trump's UAE arms sale Overnight Defense: Defense bill among Congress's year-end scramble | Iranian scientist's assassination adds hurdles to Biden's plan on nuclear deal | Navy scrapping USS Bonhomme Richard after fire MORE (Conn.): Murphy voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayCriminal justice groups offer support for Durbin amid fight for Judiciary spot National reading, math tests postponed to 2022 amid coronavirus surge Democratic anger rises over Trump obstacles to Biden transition MORE (Wash.): Murray voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Gary Peters (Mich.): Peters, who supported last month’s bill, will vote against this week's measure, according to the Detroit Free Press.

Sen. Jack ReedJack ReedLawmakers release compromise defense bill without Section 230 repeal Top Democrat calls Trump's Afghan drawdown 'the right policy decision' as others warn of 'mistake' Overnight Defense: Trump fires Defense chief Mark Esper | Worries grow about rudderless post-election Pentagon | Esper firing hints at broader post-election shake-up | Pelosi says Esper firing shows Trump intent on sowing 'chaos' MORE (R.I.): Reed voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersFormer Sanders press secretary: 'Principal concern' of Biden appointments should be policy DeVos knocks free college push as 'socialist takeover of higher education' The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Capital One — Giuliani denies discussing preemptive pardon with Trump MORE (I-Vt.): The 2016 Democratic presidential primary runner-up voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzACLU sues DHS for records on purchased cell phone data to track immigrants DHS watchdog to probe agency's tracking of Americans' phone data without a warrant Tech CEOs clash with lawmakers in contentious hearing MORE (Hawaii): Schatz voted against last month’s bill.

Sen. Charles SchumerChuck SchumerPelosi, Schumer endorse 8 billion plan as basis for stimulus talks Funding bill hits snag as shutdown deadline looms Trump supporters could hand Senate control to Democrats MORE (N.Y.): The Senate Democratic leader called the bill a “loser” and warned that his caucus is broadly opposed to the measure.

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenTop Democrat calls Trump's Afghan drawdown 'the right policy decision' as others warn of 'mistake' Overnight Defense: How members of the Armed Services committees fared in Tuesday's elections | Military ballots among those uncounted in too-close-to-call presidential race | Ninth US service member killed by COVID-19 Biden wins New Hampshire MORE (N.H.): Shaheen, who voted for the December bill, said she would vote against the new short-term bill, calling it “no way to run a government.”

Sen. Tina Smith (Minn.): Smith, who joined the Senate last month, said Thursday she would vote against the short-term bill.

Sen. Debbie Stabenow (Mich.): Stabenow, a member of Democratic leadership who is up for reelection in a state won by Trump, will vote against the bill, according to the Detroit Free Press. She backed the December bill.

Sen. Jon Tester (Mont.): Tester, who is up for reelection in a state won by Trump, wrote on Medium that "the short-term — take-it-or-leave-it — budget bill before Congress right now is a disgrace. ... It’s a failure of leadership and I’m here today to say, no more. Not on my watch." 

Sen. Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenOn The Money: COVID-19 relief picks up steam as McConnell, Pelosi hold talks | Slowing job growth raises fears of double-dip recession | Biden officially announces Brian Deese as top economic adviser GOP blocks effort to make payroll tax deferral optional for federal workers Democratic senators unveil bill to ban discrimination in financial services industry MORE (Md.): Van Hollen, the chairman of the Senate Democratic campaign arm, opposed last month’s bill.

Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallHispanic caucus unhappy with transition team treatment of Lujan Grisham Progressives urge Haaland for Interior as short list grows Senate committee approves nominations of three FEC commissioners MORE (N.M.): Udall said in a statement that “President Trump and the Republicans have a choice: They can either come to the table and negotiate in good faith on a responsible funding agreement and protection for DREAMers — or they can cause a government shutdown.”

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenSchwarzenegger says he would 'absolutely' help Biden administration Disney chair says he would consider job in Biden administration if asked Despite veto threat, Congress presses ahead on defense bill MORE (Mass.): The liberal favorite and possible presidential candidate in 2020 opposed last month’s bill.

Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseCriminal justice groups offer support for Durbin amid fight for Judiciary spot The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - COVID-19 fears surround Thanksgiving holiday Feinstein departure from top post sets stage for Judiciary fight MORE (R.I.): Whitehouse opposed last month’s bill.

Sen. Mark Warner (Va.): Along with fellow Virginia Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine, Warner said Thursday he would oppose the House GOP bill.

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHillicon Valley: Government used Patriot Act to gather website visitor logs in 2019 | Defense bill leaves out Section 230 repeal, includes White House cyber czar position | Officials warn hackers are targeting vaccine supply chain Government used Patriot Act to gather website visitor logs in 2019 Despite veto threat, Congress presses ahead on defense bill MORE (Ore.): Wyden said that he will “vote NO on a spending bill that fails to protect children at every turn and does not permanently protect Dreamers in Oregon and across the country.”