Flake to try to force vote on DACA stopgap plan
© Greg Nash

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeGrassley panel scraps Kavanaugh hearing, warns committee will vote without deal Coulter mocks Kavanaugh accuser: She'll only testify 'from a ski lift' Poll: More voters oppose Kavanaugh’s nomination than support it MORE (R-Ariz.) will try to force a vote on a plan to extend protections for a group of young immigrants known as "Dreamers" as soon as next week. 

Flake's plan would pair a three-year extension of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program with $7.6 billion in border security.
 
"In the days following the introduction of this DACA extension, I’ll be on the floor to offer a unanimous-consent request for an up-or-down vote. I can’t promise that one of my colleagues won’t object ... but I promise that I’ll be back on the floor, again and again, motioning for a vote until the Senate passes a bill providing relief to those struggling," Flake wrote in a Washington Post op-ed on Tuesday
 
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Under the Senate's rules, he will need every senator to agree to schedule action on the stopgap immigration bill. Any senator could object and block Flake from setting up a vote on his plan.  
 
Flake's maneuvering comes after the Senate rejected multiple immigration proposals last week, including the White House's proposed framework and a compromise from a key group of centrists. 
 
The setback has left DACA recipients in limbo with no clear path toward an immigration bill that could pass Congress. DACA, an Obama-era program, allows certain immigrants brought into the country illegally as children to work and go to school. 
 
Flake added that his forthcoming bill is "far from a perfect solution" but would provide a "temporary fix." 
 
"After what we’ve experienced over these past weeks, I can’t see this Congress agreeing with this president on a package that includes a path to citizenship for DACA participants coupled with significant changes to our legal immigration structure. That comprehensive immigration reform has proved to be beyond our grasp," he wrote. 
 
Some GOP senators are pointing to an end-of-March government funding bill as a possible vehicle for a DACA compromise, while House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanHow does the 25th Amendment work? Sinema, Fitzpatrick call for long-term extension of Violence Against Women Act GOP super PAC drops .5 million on Nevada ad campaign MORE (R-Wis.) says he wants his chamber to address the issue next month. 
 
GOP Sens. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneGoogle says it continues to allow apps to access Gmail user data Fight looms over national privacy law Want to improve health care? Get Americans off of their couches MORE (S.D.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGraham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' Overnight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens Bipartisan group wants to lift Medicaid restriction on substance abuse treatment MORE (Ohio) and Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranGoogle says it continues to allow apps to access Gmail user data McConnell: Sessions should stay as attorney general Tougher Russia sanctions face skepticism from Senate Republicans MORE (Kan.) are pitching a separate backup measure that would provide legal protections for current DACA recipients and a $25 billion border security trust fund. 
 
But that measure will likely face an uphill path to winning over Democrats because it doesn't include a path to citizenship and would only cover roughly 700,000 immigrants compared to the 1.8 million at the center of the Senate's competing plans.