Senators introduce gun safety bill after Florida shooting
© Greg Nash

A bipartisan group of senators is introducing gun safety legislation aimed at bolstering information-sharing between federal and state law enforcement following the Parkland, Fla., mass shooting.

The bill, known as "lie and try" legislation, would require federal officials to notify state law enforcement within 24 hours of when an individual prohibited from buying a gun tries to purchase a firearm and fails their background check. 

"By ensuring that state and federal law enforcement are working together to prevent those who shouldn’t be able to buy a gun from getting one, we can make our communities safer," Sen. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsOvernight Defense: Trump unveils new missile defense plan | Dems express alarm | Shutdown hits Day 27 | Trump cancels Pelosi foreign trip | Senators offer bill to prevent NATO withdrawal Bipartisan senators reintroduce bill to prevent Trump from withdrawing from NATO Sunday shows preview: Washington heads into multi-day shutdown MORE (D-Del.) said in a statement. 

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Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyOvernight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns Top GOP candidate drops out of Ohio Senate race MORE (R-Pa.) added that lying about your background when trying to purchase a gun is "a federal felony and it goes almost entirely unprosecuted now." 

Florida Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioWashington fears new threat from 'deepfake' videos Overnight Defense: Second Trump-Kim summit planned for next month | Pelosi accuses Trump of leaking Afghanistan trip plans | Pentagon warns of climate threat to bases | Trump faces pressure to reconsider Syria exit Pressure mounts for Trump to reconsider Syria withdrawal MORE (R) and Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonFlorida lawmaker diagnosed with pancreatic cancer Rick Scott threw party at Florida governor’s mansion after DeSantis and family had moved in: report Restoration of voting rights by felons marks shift in Florida MORE (D) — who have been in the national spotlight since last month's shooting, as well as Sens. John CornynJohn CornynTrump tells GOP senators he’s sticking to Syria and Afghanistan pullout  Texas governor, top lawmakers tell Trump not to use hurricane relief funds to build border wall The Hill's Morning Report — Trump’s attorney general pick passes first test MORE (R-Texas), Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthDems blast EPA nominee at confirmation hearing 116th Congress breaks records for women, minority lawmakers The 15 Democrats who voted against Pelosi MORE (D-Ill.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamExperts warn of persistent ISIS threat after suicide bombing Graham: Trump should meet Pakistan's leader to reset relations State of American politics is all power games and partisanship MORE (R-S.C.) and Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Trump AG pick Barr grilled at hearing | Judge rules against census citizenship question | McConnell blocks second House bill to reopen government Ex-Sen. McCaskill joins NBC, MSNBC Some Senate Dems see Ocasio-Cortez as weak spokeswoman for party MORE (D-Mo.), are also backing the legislation. 

Flagging the attempted purchases, according to the senators, would allow state officials to investigate and potentially prosecute the individuals, as well as "keep an eye on" potential future criminal activity. 

The legislation also requires the Department of Justice to publish an annual report with statistics about its prosecution of background check denial cases. 

"The NICS (National Instant Background Check System) Denial Notification Act would not only require federal authorities to flag background check denials for state-level authorities, it would also hold these federal officials accountable," Rubio said in a statement. 

The legislation comes in the wake of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 people were killed.

Despite pressure from Trump and Florida students, who have blanketed the media since the shooting, Congress's guns debate appears to have stalled. 

Lawmakers have introduced, or floated, a flurry of new legislation after the shooting. But none of the bills appear to yet have the 60 votes needed to pass the Senate or majority support in the House.