Senate tees up Yemen vote for Tuesday
© Greg Nash

The Senate has formally teed up a vote on ending U.S. military involvement in Yemen for Tuesday. 

 
If all debate time is used up, a vote is expected at approximately 4:15 p.m. on Tuesday, according to the Senate GOP cloakroom. The Senate is expected to vote on tabling, or effectively pigeonholing, the resolution. 
 
The resolution, spearheaded by Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocrats worry they don't have right candidate to beat Trump Overnight Health Care: Top health official defends contract payments to Trump allies | Vaping advocates confident Trump will turn from flavor ban | Sanders gets endorsement from nurses union Krystal Ball credits Gabbard's upswing in 2020 race to 'feckless' Democratic establishment MORE (I-Vt.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOn The Money: Retirement savings bill blocked in Senate after fight over amendments | Stopgap bill may set up December spending fight | Hardwood industry pleads for relief from Trump trade war Retirement bill blocked in Senate amid fight over amendments Senators press NSA official over shuttered phone surveillance program MORE (R-Utah) and Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyOvernight Defense: Trump, Erdogan confirm White House meeting | Public impeachment hearings set for next week | Top defense appropriator retiring Fairness, tradition, and the Constitution demand the 'whistleblower' step forward Senate Democrat: Colleague was working on fantasy football trade instead of listening to Schumer MORE (D-Conn.), would require any U.S. forces not involved in fighting al Qaeda or related groups to be out of the country within 30 days.
 
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The United States has provided support for the Saudi campaign in Yemen's three-year civil war.
 
But the resolution faces an uphill battle in a GOP-controlled Congress, with both the Trump administration and Republican leadership opposed to the effort. 
 
 
 
Murphy also appeared somewhat cautious about whether or not his resolution would be able to muster the votes. He predicted most Republicans will oppose it while the vote count remained "fluid" on the Democratic side. 
 
"You know it's a new precedent. ... I think a lot of members on our side are tying to figure out what a 'yes' vote means and what a 'no' vote means," he told The Hill. 
 
Supporters of the resolution are using a provision of the International Security and Arms Export Control Act of 1976 to force the vote.