Senate tees up Yemen vote for Tuesday
© Greg Nash

The Senate has formally teed up a vote on ending U.S. military involvement in Yemen for Tuesday. 

 
If all debate time is used up, a vote is expected at approximately 4:15 p.m. on Tuesday, according to the Senate GOP cloakroom. The Senate is expected to vote on tabling, or effectively pigeonholing, the resolution. 
 
The resolution, spearheaded by Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Memo: Trump faces steep climb to reelection California Democrats face crisis of credibility after lawsuits Fox's Brit Hume fires back at Trump's criticism of the channel MORE (I-Vt.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeFix the climate with smaller families Bolton emerges as flashpoint in GOP debate on Iran Frustrated GOP senators want answers from Trump on Iran MORE (R-Utah) and Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyConnecticut radio station rebrands itself 'Trump 103.3' Foreign Relations senators demand Iran briefing Prosecutor appointed by Barr poised to enter Washington firestorm MORE (D-Conn.), would require any U.S. forces not involved in fighting al Qaeda or related groups to be out of the country within 30 days.
 
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The United States has provided support for the Saudi campaign in Yemen's three-year civil war.
 
But the resolution faces an uphill battle in a GOP-controlled Congress, with both the Trump administration and Republican leadership opposed to the effort. 
 
GOP Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerJeff Daniels blasts 'cowardice' of Senate Republicans against Trump Corker: 'I just don't' see path to challenge Trump in 2020 Ex-GOP Sen. Corker: Trump primary would be 'good thing for our country' MORE (R-Tenn.), the chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, said on Monday evening that he wasn't sure where the votes were but hoped it wouldn't advance. 
 
 
Murphy also appeared somewhat cautious about whether or not his resolution would be able to muster the votes. He predicted most Republicans will oppose it while the vote count remained "fluid" on the Democratic side. 
 
"You know it's a new precedent. ... I think a lot of members on our side are tying to figure out what a 'yes' vote means and what a 'no' vote means," he told The Hill. 
 
Supporters of the resolution are using a provision of the International Security and Arms Export Control Act of 1976 to force the vote.