GOP senator wants vote before Trump uses force in Syria
© Greg Nash

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeThis week: Kavanaugh nomination thrown into further chaos Ex-college classmate accuses Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct Kavanaugh accuser agrees to testify next week MORE (R-Utah) is urging President TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Republican threatens to push for Rosenstein impeachment unless he testifies Judge suggests Trump’s tweet about Stormy Daniels was ‘hyperbole’ not defamation Rosenstein faces Trump showdown MORE to get congressional authorization before he uses military force to respond to an alleged chemical weapons attack in Syria.

“The use of chemical weapons absolutely requires a response from the United States,” Lee said in a statement. "But if that response is going to include military force, the president of the United States should come to Congress and ask for authorization before military force is used."

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The administration is weighing how to respond to the attack, which reportedly killed at least 70 people in a town controlled by opponents of Syrian President Bashar Assad. 

On Monday, Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisOvernight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — Trump returns to UN praising Kim | Iran in crosshairs later this week | US warns Russia on missile defense in Syria Bolton: Russian missile system sale to Syria a 'significant escalation' Overnight Defense: Trump identifies first soldier remains from North Korea | New cyber strategy lets US go on offense | Army chief downplays talk of 'Fort Trump' MORE would not rule out an airstrike in response to the alleged chemical attack. Trump separately said he would decide on the U.S. response “over the next 24 to 48 hours."
Last year, Trump responded militarily to reported chemical weapons use in Syria, ordering the U.S. military to launch Tomahawk missiles at a Syrian airfield believed to be the launching point of that attack.
 
Republicans, at the time, largely dismissed the need for Trump to get approval from Congress, characterizing it as a limited, one-time strike that they supported.