Senate harassment bill runs into opposition from House
© Greg Nash

House lawmakers are expressing opposition to a Senate bill that would change how Congress handles sexual harassment claims, arguing it would not do enough to support victims of harassment.

Critics of the bill, approved Thursday by the Senate in a voice vote, are backed by civil rights groups who say the legislation would limit the behavior for which lawmakers can actually be held accountable.

“I look forward to going to conference because it appears to shift the power back to the institution instead of the victims,” Rep. Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierSenators introduce legislation to boost cyber defense training in high school Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment It's time for the left to advance a shared vision of national security: Start by passing the NDAA MORE (D-Calif.) said in a statement.

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Speier, a leading voice in the effort to impose more stringent rules for sexual harassment on lawmakers, separately told CNN’s “New Day” that “both Republicans and Democrats on the House side are disappointed” in the Senate bill.

So far, House leaders aren’t promising to take up the Senate bill as written.

AshLee Strong, a spokeswoman for House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanJuan Williams: Trump fans the flames of white grievance Ex-White House spokesman Raj Shah joins Fox Corporation as senior vice president Trump quietly rolled back programs to detect, combat weapons of mass destruction: report MORE (R-Wis.), noted the chamber passed its own bipartisan legislation in February.

“We are currently reviewing the Senate bill, and discussing next steps,” she said.

House Administration Committee Chairman Gregg HarperGregory (Gregg) Livingston HarperCongress sends bill overhauling sexual harassment policy to Trump's desk Dems cry foul in undecided N.C. race Mississippi New Members 2019 MORE (R-Miss.) added that the committee is “currently reviewing the bill that was passed by the Senate … along with their proposed reforms.”

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntGOP wants commitment that Trump will sign budget deal Poll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Senate passes bill making hacking voting systems a federal crime MORE (R-Mo.), who co-authored the Senate bill with Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharThe Hill's Morning Report — Mueller Time: Dems, GOP ready questions for high-stakes testimony Democratic strategist predicts most 2020 candidates will drop out in late fall The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump hits media over 'send her back' coverage MORE (D-Minn.), downplayed the chances that lawmakers would need to formally go to conference to work out their differences.

But Speier is calling for a conference, and she is getting support for that idea from House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi, Mnuchin reach 'near-final agreement' on budget, debt ceiling Wendy Davis launches bid for Congress in Texas Steyer calls on Pelosi to cancel 'six-week vacation' for Congress MORE (D-Calif.).

"Given the substantive differences between the two bills, the House and the Senate must now go to conference to produce a strong, final version that provides greater transparency and accountability, and fosters a climate of respect and dignity in the Congress," Pelosi said in a statement Friday.

Democrats on the House Administration Committee added in a tweet that “from what we’ve reviewed so far, we continue to believe the House version is a stronger bill — in terms of adjudication process and protection of victims and rights of all parties.”

The looming fight over how to reconcile the two chambers' proposals could hamper lawmakers’ ability to get a speedy resolution on an issue that has plagued Congress amid high-profile harassment scandals both on and off Capitol Hill. 

Sexual misconduct has forced seven lawmakers to either resign or retire, and Harvey Weinstein — formerly a major donor for Democrats and one of several high-profile men in Hollywood facing accusations — turned himself in Friday morning to the police, who have charged him with rape, among other counts.

Klobuchar said in a joint interview with Blunt on CNN published on Thursday that she wanted to send a bill to President TrumpDonald John TrumpChelsea Clinton announces birth of third child Ukrainian officials and Giuliani are sharing back-channel campaign information: report Trump attacks 'the Squad' as 'racist group of troublemakers' MORE’s desk “this summer.”

The Senate legislation would overhaul Congress's harassment policy by streamlining the claims process for victims and making members personally liable for harassment settlements.

It would eliminate a 30-day counseling period, a 30-day mediation phase and a 30-day “cooling off” period required for victims of sexual harassment under the Congressional Accountability Act.

For a senator to be found personally liable under the new legislation, a hearing officer, judge or the Senate Ethics Committee would have to find that a member personally harassed someone. It doubles the amount of time, compared to the House bill, for a victim to decide if they want to file a lawsuit after they approach the Office of Congressional Compliance.

But lawmakers and outside groups criticize it for only holding lawmakers personally liable for harassment settlements. In the House legislation, lawmakers were personally liable for settlements stemming from harassment or discrimination.

“The Senate’s proposal does not provide the strong mechanism of transparency and accountability that taxpayers deserve – for example, by ensuring that no taxpayer money is used to pay settlements for discrimination or harassment,” said Remington Gregg, counsel for civil justice and consumer rights at Public Citizen.

Five groups, including Public Citizen, sent a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report — Mueller Time: Dems, GOP ready questions for high-stakes testimony Election security to take back seat at Mueller hearing McConnell challenger faces tougher path after rocky launch MORE (R-Ky.) and Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTrump says he will meet with Schumer 'ASAP' after border visit Dem senator describes 'overcrowded quarters,' 'harsh odor' at border facilities Top Democrats demand security assessment of Trump properties MORE (D-N.Y.) saying the Senate bill “falls short of an acceptable compromise, and may have unintended negative consequences.”

Critics of the bill are also voicing concern that the Senate legislation’s definition of harassment is too narrow and that it uses the phrase “unwelcome harassment,” which, they argue, could create an unintended loophole that makes it harder for victims of harassment to file a claim.

House lawmakers and outside groups are also raising concerns about the level of oversight the Senate bill gives to the Senate Ethics Committee, underscoring skepticism that lawmakers will be unbiased when deciding whether or not to force their colleagues to pay a settlement.

Under the Senate bill, the Ethics Committee, which conducts most of its work behind closed doors, would get to review and sign off on any settlement agreements that involve a senator.

Members of the House Ethics Committee took a jab at the Senate bill, noting that the House-passed legislation “does not condition the imposition of personal liability upon the outcome of any such investigations.”

“We believe that any proposal … should include provisions to ensure that Members remain personally liable for their own conduct with respect to discrimination and retaliation,” Reps. Susan BrooksSusan Wiant BrooksAl Green says impeachment is 'only solution' to Trump's rhetoric Trump primary challenger Bill Weld responds to rally chants: 'We are in a fight for the soul of the GOP' Democratic strategist on Trump tweets: 'He's feeding this fear and hate' MORE (R-Ind.) and Ted DeutchTheodore (Ted) Eliot DeutchBipartisan group of lawmakers invites colleagues to tour DC's Holocaust museum GOP senator presses Instagram, Facebook over alleged bias in content recommendations Overnight Defense: Senate rejects effort to restrict Trump on Iran | Democrats at debate vow to shore up NATO | Senate confirms chief of Space Command MORE (D-Fla.) added in a joint statement.

Updated at 12:55 p.m.