Senators to introduce bill to rein in Trump's tariff authority
© Greg Nash

Senators are planning to introduce legislation as soon as Tuesday to require President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump opens new line of impeachment attack for Democrats Bloomberg to spend 0M on anti-Trump ads in battleground states New witness claims first-hand account of Trump's push for Ukraine probes MORE to get congressional approval for tariffs implemented for national security purposes. 

Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerLindsey Graham basks in the impeachment spotlight The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Nareit — White House cheers Republicans for storming impeachment hearing GOP senators frustrated with Romney jabs at Trump MORE (R-Tenn.), who is spearheading the legislation, told reporters that he will roll out the bill as early as Tuesday and wants to try to get it attached to a defense policy bill that the Senate will start work on later this week.

“If a president decided he was going to invoke 232 and declare something a national security threat he would still go through all the processes he goes through now but, in the end, Congress will have to approve it,” Corker said.

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Under the bill, Corker said, a vote on approving tariffs invoked under Section 232 of the trade law could be expedited through Congress. The bill, if signed into law, would also be retroactive going back two years. 

Corker, who is retiring at the end of his term, declined to say who is backing his bill, which he noted could slip to Wednesday morning, but said he had support from senators on both sides of the aisle.

Corker said that he is hoping to add his bill to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), an annual defense policy bill that the Senate is expected to start work on as soon as Wednesday.

"There's a lot of interest in it for what it's worth. I would hope that we would be able to add it to NDAA since it's a national security bill but, you know, doing anything around here is like pushing a major boulder uphill," he said.

The forthcoming legislation comes as Republicans have expressed increasing frustrations on Trump's trade policies after the president slapped steep tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from the European Union, Canada and Mexico ending an exemption for the key trading partners.

But getting a vote on an amendment to the NDAA would require Corker to work out a deal with each of his colleagues, including members of leadership who have downplayed the chances that Congress will pass legislation addressing Trump's tariff actions.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Trump asks Supreme Court to block Dem subpoena for financial records | Kudlow 'very optimistic' for new NAFTA deal | House passes Ex-Im Bank bill opposed by Trump, McConnell Top House Democrats ask for review of DHS appointments Warren promises gradual move toward 'Medicare for All' in first 100 days MORE (R-Ky.) said last week that there is "not much" Congress could do legislatively if Trump presses forward with the tariffs.

And Sen. John CornynJohn CornynGOP senators balk at lengthy impeachment trial Overnight Health Care: Trump officials making changes to drug pricing proposal | House panel advances flavored e-cig ban | Senators press FDA tobacco chief on vaping ban Senate GOP waves Trump off early motion to dismiss impeachment charges MORE (R-Texas), McConnell's No. 2, told reporters on Monday that it was unlikely Congress would pass or Trump would sign legislation clawing back some of his authority on trade.

Asked if he had McConnell's support, Corker smirked before adding: "I think the majority leader, my guess is, would be very receptive from a policy standpoint. Might be concerned from other standpoints.”

Any legislation would likely ultimately need support from two-thirds of both chambers, enough to overcome a presidential veto.

Corker acknowledged that the White House would likely not be enthusiastic about the bill, but said Congress is "a separate but equal branch."

Other than Corker, Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeHillicon Valley: Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract in court | State antitrust investigation into Google expands | Intel agencies no longer collecting location data without warrant Senators introduce bipartisan bill restricting police use of facial recognition tech Fed chief urges Congress to expand US workforce while economy still strong MORE (R-Utah) has introduced broader legislation that would require congressional approval for any tariffs, and Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyNSA improperly collected US phone records in October, new documents show Overnight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns MORE (R-Pa.) is the latest senator to sign on to that bill, but he noted on Tuesday that it doesn't yet have support from Democrats.