Senators are moving forward with legislation that would curb President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump to oust Nielsen as early as this week: report California wildfire becomes deadliest in state’s history Sinema’s Senate win cheered by LGBTQ groups MORE's authority on tariffs, despite opposition from the White House.

"If the president truly believes invoking Section 232 is necessary to protect the United States from a genuine threat, he should make the case to Congress and to the American people and do the hard work necessary to secure congressional approval," Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerJuan Williams: Trump's hostile takeover of the GOP Divided Congress to clash over Space Force, nuclear arsenal Flake not ruling out 2020 run against Trump MORE (R-Tenn.) said in a statement announcing the bill.

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In addition to Corker, Sens. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampGOP nerves on edge after Sinema takes lead over McSally Pro-Israel organizations should finally seek payback against Iran deal Dems McCaskill points finger at Fox following loss, calls it ‘state-owned news channel’ MORE (D-N.D.), Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyOvernight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns Top GOP candidate drops out of Ohio Senate race MORE (R-Pa.), Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerWarner 'disappointed' in how Trump replaced Sessions Warner expresses concerns over potential future election meddling The Hill's Morning Report — Trump heads to Paris as attorney general controversy intensifies MORE (D-Va.), Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderBlackburn keeps Tennessee seat in GOP hands  Overnight Health Care — Presented by Purdue Pharma — Judge urges insurers to drop challenge over non-ObamaCare plans | Azar vows to push ahead with drug pricing proposal | No increase for ObamaCare outreach budget Dems blast Trump rule changes on ObamaCare MORE (R-Tenn.), Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzDem senator: Scandalous that troops at border will miss Thanksgiving for 'no national security reason'  Overnight Health Care — Presented by Purdue Pharma — Dems close campaign by hammering GOP on health care | Senior HHS official dies | FDA approved cannabis-based drug now available | Bipartisan report looks into insulin price spike Democrats close campaign by hammering GOP on health care MORE (D-Hawaii), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonCommerce Department IG to audit Trump's tariff exemptions Trump trip to rural Wisconsin highlights GOP’s turnout concern GOP senator seeking information on FBI dealings with Bruce Ohr, former DOJ lawyer MORE (R-Wis.), Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenMomentum builds for Dems to take on campaign finance reform Rosen defeats Heller in Nevada Senate race The Hill's Morning Report — What if the polls are wrong? MORE (D-Md.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeCongress must make sentencing reform priority for public safety MyPillow CEO to attend White House opioid discussion Congress raises pressure on Saudi Arabia MORE (R-Utah), Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeSinema defeats McSally in Arizona Senate race Scott to attend new member orientation amid recount Scarborough: Trump throwing doubt into elections is ‘action of a tyrant’ MORE (R-Ariz.), Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseElection Countdown: Arizona Senate race still too close to call | Florida vote tally fight heats up | Trump calls for Abrams to 'move on' Flake not ruling out 2020 run against Trump Parties start gaming out 2020 battleground MORE (R-Neb.) and Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonUS firm goes on lobbying blitz in fight with Angola Trump renews attacks against Tester over VA nominee on eve of Montana rally House conservatives want ethics probe into Dems' handling of Kavanaugh allegations MORE (R-Ga.) are supporting the bill.

"There is no real national security threat that these tariffs are a response to. They are an effort to impose a protectionist policy for economic purposes," Toomey said in a floor speech blasting the administration's decisions.

The bill would require Trump to submit tariffs implemented under Section 232 of the trade law for approval to Congress. Any approval legislation would then be fast-tracked through both chambers.

Senators are introducing the legislation despite receiving pushback from Trump, who earlier on Wednesday privately urged Corker not to file his bill.

“I talked at length with the president about it today. He's obviously not pleased with this effort,” Corker separately told reporters.

Corker added that Trump's main message in the phone call, which the president initiated, was for Corker to not move forward with the proposal.

But congressional Republicans are becoming increasingly frustrated with Trump's trade policy, which they worry could roil the economy just months before a midterm election. 

The administration ratcheted up long-simmering tensions late last week when they announced that they would subject steel and aluminum imports from Canada, Mexico and the European Union to steep tariffs, ending an exemption for the trading allies.

A group of GOP senators met with Trump on Wednesday at the White House to discuss trade. The meeting was organized by GOP Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamElection Countdown: Florida braces for volatile recount | Counties race to finish machine recount | Trump ramps up attacks | Abrams files new lawsuit in Georgia | 2020 to be new headache for Schumer | Why California counts its ballots so slowly Trump, California battle over climate and cause of fires Schumer’s headaches to multiply in next Congress MORE (S.C.).

“I think Sen. Graham, who is the leader of that meeting, just wants to talk to the president about his end game,” Sen. John CornynJohn CornynCongress braces for high-drama lame duck Trump's shortlist for attorney general takes shape Beto lost but Texas Democrats have a lot to celebrate MORE (R-Texas) told reporters when asked about the meeting.

Graham said after the closed-door meeting that Trump is "on track to get us better trade deals" and signaled he will oppose Corker's legislation.

“Now is not the time to undercut President Trump’s ability to negotiate better trade deals. I will not support any efforts that weaken his position," Graham said in a statement.

Notably missing from the supporters of Corker's bill are members of Senate GOP leadership.

Some GOP senators are wary of picking a fight with Trump, saying lawmakers should focus on trying to change the president’s mind. 

"I'm not sure right at this particular time it's advisable. ... My preference would be to convince the president that perhaps he should take a different approach," Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsEvangelical leader: Not worth risking ties with Saudi Arabia over missing journalist GOP loads up lame-duck agenda as House control teeters Congress allows farm bill to lapse before reauthorization deadline MORE (R-Kan.) told reporters. 

Pressed if that strategy was working, Roberts acknowledged, "to date, no." 

Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) added that while he is reviewing Corker's legislation, he still believes "that the president is too smart to start a trade war." 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPress: Trumpism takes a thumping The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — Trump says Florida races should be called for GOP | Latest on California wildfires | Congress set for dramatic lame duck Congress braces for high-drama lame duck MORE (R-Ky.) told reporters on Tuesday that he would not bring up the tariff legislation as a stand-alone bill but noted the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) was open to amendment.

“I'm not going to call it up free-standing. You're suggesting it might be offered as an amendment. NDAA's going to be opened, we'll see what amendments are offered,” McConnell said, asked about Corker's bill.

Corker has pointed to the NDAA as one potential vehicle for his tariff legislation. But getting the bill brought up as an amendment to the defense policy bill would require the consent of every senator.

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeDivided Congress to clash over Space Force, nuclear arsenal Midterms poised to shake up US-Saudi defense ties Graham: 'Game changer' if Saudis behind journalist's disappearance MORE (R-Okla.), who is managing the bill in the absence of Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCainJohn Sidney McCainSinema invokes McCain in Senate acceptance speech Overnight Health Care — Presented by The Partnership for Safe Medicines — Medicaid expansion gets extra boost from governors' races | Utah's expansion to begin April 1 | GOP lawmaker blames McCain for Dems winning House Overnight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — Trump's Armistice Day trip marked by controversy | US ends aerial refueling to Saudi coalition in Yemen | Analysts identify undeclared North Korean missile bases MORE (R-Ariz.), said he thought Corker would ultimately be able to get a vote. 

"I think it will. In fact, I told Corker that I would not object to it," Inhofe said, while noting he would vote against the amendment. 

Asked if he thought Corker's bill should get a vote as part of the NDAA, Cornyn said the Senate should have an "open amendment process." 

"It's the source of a lot of frustration here among members when people are denied an opportunity to vote. Back in the good old days ... we used to have [a] much more open amendment process," he said. 

But the process for setting up roll call votes on amendments to the NDAA has ground to a halt in recent years as senators object to a vote on any amendment unless they can also get a vote on their own proposals.

Cornyn noted on Wednesday that there are already objections to amendments as lawmakers jockey for leverage, which could complicate Corker's quest to add his tariff legislation to the defense policy bill.

Business groups, considered a long-standing ally of Republicans, quickly backed Corker's bill.

Neil Bradley, the executive vice president and chief policy officer for the Chamber of Commerce, said on Wednesday that there was concern that Trump's tariff decision would cost American jobs. 

"The constitutional authority of the Congress to 'regulate foreign trade' and its oversight of tariff policy is unambiguous. The modest proposal to clarify congressional prerogatives is welcome and long overdue," Bradley added.

There is no sign that the House is prepared to introduce similar legislation. Asked about the tariff legislation on Wednesday, Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanRepublicans must learn from the election mistake on immigration Congress braces for high-drama lame duck Without new Democratic message, Donald Trump is the 2020 favorite MORE (Wis.) noted that Trump would have to sign the bill.

“You would have to pass a law that he would want to sign into law,” he told reporters. “You can do the math on that.”

Updated at 7:03 p.m.