More than a dozen Republican senators are asking the Trump administration to halt the separation of immigrant families at the U.S.-Mexico border while Congress works out legislation.

GOP senators, led by Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchGOP opens door to holding Kavanaugh committee vote this week Press: Judge Kavanaugh must withdraw Hatch: Second Kavanaugh allegation is 'phony' MORE (Utah), sent a letter to Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsRosenstein faces Trump showdown Solicitor general could take over Mueller probe if Rosenstein exits 13 states accepted Sessions invitation to meeting on social media bias: report MORE asking for a moratorium of the president's controversial "zero tolerance" policy, which is resulting in the separation of families detained at the border.

"We support the administration’s efforts to enforce our immigration laws, but we cannot support implementation of a policy that results in the categorical forced separation of minor children from their parents," the Republican senators wrote.

"We therefore ask you to halt implementation of the Department’s zero tolerance policy while Congress works out a solution that enables faster processing of individuals who enter our country illegally without requiring the forced, inhumane separation of children from their parents," the senators continued.

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In addition to Hatch, GOP Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainCongress must use bipartisan oversight as the gold standard The Hill's Morning Report — Ford, Kavanaugh to testify Thursday as another accuser comes forward Trump hits McCain on ObamaCare vote MORE (Ariz.), Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsPat Robertson asks followers to help cast 'shield of protection' ahead of hurricane Cruz gets help from Senate GOP in face of serious challenge from O’Rourke The farm bill gives Congress a chance to act on the Pet and Women Safety (PAWS) Act MORE (Kan.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsRosenstein faces Trump showdown Kavanaugh: I'm asking for a 'fair process' Collins: Second Kavanaugh accuser should speak with Senate panel under oath  MORE (Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPolice arrest 128 protesting Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill GOP launches counteroffensive on Kavanaugh Kavanaugh protesters descend on Collins, Flake offices on Capitol Hill MORE (Alaska), Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerPoll: More voters oppose Kavanaugh’s nomination than support it Ford opens door to testifying next week Police arrest nearly two dozen Kavanaugh protesters MORE (Tenn.), Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderOvernight Health Care: GOP plays defense over pre-existing conditions | Groups furious over new Trump immigration proposal | Public health advocates decry funding transfer over migrant children Overnight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil MORE (Tenn.), John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanOvernight Defense: Duncan Hunter refusing to step down from committees | Trump awards Medal of Honor to widow of airman | Pentagon names pick for Mideast commander Trump awards posthumous Medal of Honor to family of fallen Air Force sergeant GOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE MORE (Ark.), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerOvernight Health Care: GOP plays defense over pre-existing conditions | Groups furious over new Trump immigration proposal | Public health advocates decry funding transfer over migrant children GOP plays defense on ObamaCare’s pre-existing conditions Heller embraces Trump in risky attempt to survive in November MORE (Nev.), Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerSome employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report Colorado governor sets up federal PAC before potential 2020 campaign Hillicon Valley: Trump signs off on sanctions for election meddlers | Russian hacker pleads guilty over botnet | Reddit bans QAnon forum | FCC delays review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger | EU approves controversial copyright law MORE (Colo.), James LankfordJames Paul LankfordTrump’s new cyber approach: The best defense is a good offense Conservatives left frustrated as Congress passes big spending bills Outdated global postal system hurts US manufacturers MORE (Okla.), Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyOvernight Health Care: GOP plays defense over pre-existing conditions | Groups furious over new Trump immigration proposal | Public health advocates decry funding transfer over migrant children Overnight Health Care: Opioids package nears finish line | Measure to help drug companies draws ire | Maryland ObamaCare rates to drop Overnight Health Care: HHS diverts funds to pay for detaining migrant children | Health officials defend transfers | Lawmakers consider easing drug company costs in opioids deal MORE (La.) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGraham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' Overnight Health Care: Senators target surprise medical bills | Group looks to allow Medicaid funds for substance abuse programs | FDA launches anti-vaping campaign for teens Bipartisan group wants to lift Medicaid restriction on substance abuse treatment MORE (Ohio) signed on to the letter to Sessions.

Trump's immigrant policies have fueled days of media coverage and sparked high-profile backlash from Republicans on and off Capitol Hill.

The senators added in their letter Tuesday that they've "read with increasing alarm" media reports of immigrant children being separated from their parents.

"Although enforcing our immigration laws is an essential responsibility of the federal government, it must be done in a way that is consistent with our values and ordinary human decency," the GOP senators added.

Sessions announced the "zero tolerance" policy in April as part of a move to prosecute adults who illegally cross the border to the fullest extent of the law. As a result, children are separated from their parents and detained as the adults are prosecuted.

Trump and administration officials have tried to shift the blame to Democrats, arguing that their hands are essentially tied.

But GOP senators rejected that in their letter, saying while the current "crisis has multiple contributing causes ... the immediate cause of the crisis is your Department’s recent institution of a 'zero tolerance' policy."

Senators are scrambling to come up with legislation that would deal narrowly with families detained at the border instead of a broader immigration bill like the proposals being debated by the House.

But there is no sign yet of a bill that can get 60 votes in the Senate. Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrump changes mean only wealthy immigrants may apply, says critic The Hill's Morning Report — Ford, Kavanaugh to testify Thursday as another accuser comes forward Viral video shows O’Rourke air-drumming to the Who’s ‘Baba O’Riley’ after Cruz debate MORE (R-Texas) is expected to introduce his own bill and a working group of GOP senators, led by Sen. John CornynJohn CornynFord's lawyer: Hearing doesn't appear to be designed for 'fair', 'respectful' treatment GOP opens door to holding Kavanaugh committee vote this week GOP senator accuses Dems of ‘character assassination’ on Kavanaugh MORE (Texas), are aiming to introduce legislation this week.

Meanwhile, Democrats have coalesced behind legislation from Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinHere's what the judiciary committee should ask Christine Blasey Ford Kavanaugh to address sexual misconduct allegations on Fox News Monday Kavanaugh accuser Ford to Grassley: 'My fear will not hold me back from testifying' MORE (D-Calif.) that Republicans believe is too broad and would result in immigrants who tried to enter the country illegally being released.

"Right now there is a full-on Democrat bill, that they've already put out. We'll have some Republican response to it. And then we've got to be able to work together to get an actual final bill that could actually pass," Lankford separately told reporters after a closed-door policy lunch.