Senate Democrats protested President TrumpDonald John TrumpOver 100 lawmakers consistently voted against chemical safeguards: study CNN's Anderson Cooper unloads on Trump Jr. for spreading 'idiotic' conspiracy theories about him Cohn: Jamie Dimon would be 'phenomenal' president MORE's "zero tolerance" immigration policies, warning that Wednesday's executive order keeping migrant families together will only worsen the situation along the U.S.-Mexico border. 

Democrats, speaking from the Senate floor for roughly two hours, warned that the new policy raises fresh questions and warned it could result in the indefinite detention of children. 

"If you can imagine it what this executive order does is raise the possibility of children being in prison for very, very long periods of time. ...Does anybody really believe that we should be prisoning for an indefinite period of time little children," said Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersProtecting democracy requires action from all of us Kavanaugh hires attorney amid sexual assault allegations: report Amazon probes allegations of employees leaking data for bribes: report MORE (I-Vt.), who caucuses with the Democrats. 

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinTop Senate Dem: Public hearing is ‘only way to go’ for Kavanaugh accuser Durbin calls for delay in Kavanaugh vote Dems engage in last-ditch effort to block Kavanaugh MORE (Ill.), the No. 2 Senate Democrat, added: "This president's executive order does not solve this problem. It makes it worse." 

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In addition to Durbin and Sanders, Democratic Sens. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyOvernight Energy: Warren bill would force companies to disclose climate impacts | Green group backs Gillum in Florida gov race | Feds to open refuge near former nuke site Warren wants companies to disclose more about climate change impacts DHS transferred about 0M from separate agencies to ICE this year: report MORE (Ore.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharGOP in striking distance to retake Franken seat Warner: 'overwhelming majority' of Republicans would back social media regulations Republicans block Democratic bid to subpoena Kavanaugh documents MORE (Minn.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenSome employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report Hillicon Valley: North Korean IT firm hit with sanctions | Zuckerberg says Facebook better prepared for midterms | Big win for privacy advocates in Europe | Bezos launches B fund to help children, homeless Hillicon Valley: Trump signs off on sanctions for election meddlers | Russian hacker pleads guilty over botnet | Reddit bans QAnon forum | FCC delays review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger | EU approves controversial copyright law MORE (Ore.), Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by Better Medicare Alliance — Cuomo wins and Manafort plea deal Virginia reps urge Trump to declare federal emergency ahead of Hurricane Florence More Dems come out in public opposition to Kavanaugh MORE (Va.), Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanHouse panel advances DHS cyber vulnerabilities bills Chris Pappas wins Democratic House primary in New Hampshire Overnight Health Care: Manchin fires gun at anti-ObamaCare lawsuit in new ad | More Dems come out against Kavanaugh | Michigan seeks Medicaid work requirements MORE (N.H.), Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoSenate Dems sue Archives to try to force release of Kavanaugh documents Dems call on Senate to postpone Kavanaugh vote Republicans block Democratic bid to subpoena Kavanaugh documents MORE (Hawaii) Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetMultiple NFL players continue on-field protests during national anthem No NFL players visibly kneel during season opener Colorado Dem questions White House on 'intentional effort to mislead the American people' on marijuana MORE (Colo.), Richard Blumenthal (Conn.) Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSenate Dems sue Archives to try to force release of Kavanaugh documents The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil Judd Gregg: The collapse of the Senate MORE (Calif.), Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeySome employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report Overnight Energy: Warren bill would force companies to disclose climate impacts | Green group backs Gillum in Florida gov race | Feds to open refuge near former nuke site ICE: No immigration enforcement in areas of hurricane shelters or evacuations MORE (Mass.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayTime for action to improve government data analysis Overnight Health Care: Opioid bill, action on drug prices top fall agenda | ObamaCare defenders prep for court case | Koch group ad hits McCaskill on health care Measure making it easier to prosecute police for deadly force on Washington ballot MORE (Wash.) spoke from the floor. 

The string of floor speeches comes after Trump signed an executive order that requires that detained immigrant families are kept together "where appropriate and consistent with law and available resources."

The "zero tolerance" policy implemented by the Trump administration had resulted in the separation of immigrant parents and children when they were being detained along the border. 

Hirono recounted that when her mother left Japan she had to leave Hirono's three-year-old brother behind temporarily. 

"My younger brother left behind in Japan never really recovered from the trauma of his separation from his mother and his siblings. My mother always had deep sorrow about having to leave her baby behind," she said. 

The policies had sparked bipartisan backlash on Capitol Hill, where Republicans publicly called on Trump to back down as the issue spiraled into a political crisis. 

Kaine argued that the policy "triggered our moral gag reflex" 

Though Republicans have largely been supportive of the executive order, Democrat argued it would only make the problem worse and likely immediately being challenged in court. 

"It sounds like a return to the shameful internment camps of the 1940s during World War II during one of the darkest chapters of our nation's history," Markey said. "It was a mistake. That we should not even contemplate repeating." 

Democrats also raised concerns that the executive order did not address families that have already been separated, and would not help locate children who have already been placed in custody of the Department of Health and Human Services. 

Kaine recounted the story of a father who was separated from his family when he was taken into custody and committed suicide. 

"As we try to reassemble 2,300 families that this Administration has spread to the winds, there will be at least one three-year-old boy who will not be able to reunite with his father," Kaine said. "I ask this President, I ask the Attorney General, I ask the Secretary of Homeland Security: Was it worth it?” 

—Updated at 8:59 p.m.