Senate Democrats protested President TrumpDonald John TrumpRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports Allies wary of Shanahan's assurances with looming presence of Trump States file lawsuit seeking to block Trump's national emergency declaration MORE's "zero tolerance" immigration policies, warning that Wednesday's executive order keeping migrant families together will only worsen the situation along the U.S.-Mexico border. 

Democrats, speaking from the Senate floor for roughly two hours, warned that the new policy raises fresh questions and warned it could result in the indefinite detention of children. 

"If you can imagine it what this executive order does is raise the possibility of children being in prison for very, very long periods of time. ...Does anybody really believe that we should be prisoning for an indefinite period of time little children," said Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersCongress closer to forcing Trump’s hand on Saudi support Booker seeks dialogue about race as he kicks off 2020 campaign Capitalism: The known ideal MORE (I-Vt.), who caucuses with the Democrats. 

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal Trump praises law enforcement response to shooting at Illinois business Five dead in shooting at manufacturing plant in Aurora, Illinois MORE (Ill.), the No. 2 Senate Democrat, added: "This president's executive order does not solve this problem. It makes it worse." 

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In addition to Durbin and Sanders, Democratic Sens. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyGOP Green New Deal stunt is a great deal for Democrats The border deal: What made it in, what got left out Lawmakers introduce bill to fund government, prevent shutdown MORE (Ore.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharKlobuchar defends work record: Yes, I am a 'tough boss' Female Dems see double standard in Klobuchar accusations Klobuchar, O'Rourke visit Wisconsin as 2020 race heats up MORE (Minn.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenKremlin seeks more control over internet in Russia Wisconsin governor to propose decriminalization of marijuana High stakes as Trump, Dems open drug price talks MORE (Ore.), Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal Overnight Defense: Trump declares border emergency | .6B in military construction funds to be used for wall | Trump believes Obama would have started war with North Korea | Pentagon delivers aid for Venezuelan migrants Kaine asks Shanahan if military families would be hurt by moving .6B for border wall MORE (Va.), Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Dems blast rulemaking on family planning program | Facebook may remove anti-vaccine content | Medicare proposes coverage for new cancer treatment Trade official warns senators of obstacles to quick China deal Actor Chris Evans meets with Democratic senators before State of the Union MORE (N.H.), Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoFemale Dems see double standard in Klobuchar accusations Trump tweets video mocking Dems not cheering during State of the Union New battle lines in war over Trump’s judicial picks MORE (Hawaii) Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetDemocratic donors stuck in shopping phase of primary Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — CDC blames e-cigs for rise in youth tobacco use | FDA cracks down on dietary supplements | More drug pricing hearings on tap The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the American Academy of HIV Medicine - Next 24 hours critical for stalled funding talks MORE (Colo.), Richard Blumenthal (Conn.) Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHarris, Booker call for judgement on Jussie Smollett case to be withheld until investigation is completed Harris calls idea of Trump trusting Putin over US intel ‘height of irresponsibility and shameful’ Barack, Michelle Obama expected to refrain from endorsing in 2020 Dem primary: report MORE (Calif.), Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyDemocrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal The Green New Deal would benefit independent family farmers Juan Williams: America needs radical solutions MORE (Mass.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Dems blast rulemaking on family planning program | Facebook may remove anti-vaccine content | Medicare proposes coverage for new cancer treatment Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Senators seek answers on surprise medical bills | Red states move to limit Medicaid expansion | Two drug companies agree to testify Senate Dems block Sasse measure meant to respond to Virginia bill MORE (Wash.) spoke from the floor. 

The string of floor speeches comes after Trump signed an executive order that requires that detained immigrant families are kept together "where appropriate and consistent with law and available resources."

The "zero tolerance" policy implemented by the Trump administration had resulted in the separation of immigrant parents and children when they were being detained along the border. 

Hirono recounted that when her mother left Japan she had to leave Hirono's three-year-old brother behind temporarily. 

"My younger brother left behind in Japan never really recovered from the trauma of his separation from his mother and his siblings. My mother always had deep sorrow about having to leave her baby behind," she said. 

The policies had sparked bipartisan backlash on Capitol Hill, where Republicans publicly called on Trump to back down as the issue spiraled into a political crisis. 

Kaine argued that the policy "triggered our moral gag reflex" 

Though Republicans have largely been supportive of the executive order, Democrat argued it would only make the problem worse and likely immediately being challenged in court. 

"It sounds like a return to the shameful internment camps of the 1940s during World War II during one of the darkest chapters of our nation's history," Markey said. "It was a mistake. That we should not even contemplate repeating." 

Democrats also raised concerns that the executive order did not address families that have already been separated, and would not help locate children who have already been placed in custody of the Department of Health and Human Services. 

Kaine recounted the story of a father who was separated from his family when he was taken into custody and committed suicide. 

"As we try to reassemble 2,300 families that this Administration has spread to the winds, there will be at least one three-year-old boy who will not be able to reunite with his father," Kaine said. "I ask this President, I ask the Attorney General, I ask the Secretary of Homeland Security: Was it worth it?” 

—Updated at 8:59 p.m.