Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerGOP Green New Deal stunt is a great deal for Democrats National emergency declaration — a legal fight Trump is likely to win House Judiciary Dems seek answers over Trump's national emergency declaration MORE (D-N.Y.) said on Monday night that he will oppose Brett Kavanaugh, President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump nominates Jeffrey Rosen to replace Rosenstein at DOJ McCabe says ‘it’s possible’ Trump is a Russian asset McCabe: Trump ‘undermining the role of law enforcement’ MORE's pick for the Supreme Court, and he urged the Senate to reject the nominee.

"I will oppose Judge Kavanaugh’s nomination with everything I have, and I hope a bipartisan majority will do the same," Schumer said. "The stakes are simply too high for anything less."
 
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His statement came minutes after Trump announced that he would nominate Kavanaugh to succeed retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy on the Supreme Court.
 
Democrats don't have the ability to block Trump's nominee on their own; Republicans got rid of the 60-vote filibuster on Supreme Court nominations last year.
 
But Democrats are hoping to repeat a strategy that allowed them to defeat an ObamaCare repeal effort last year: keep their 49-member caucus united and win over at least two GOP senators.
 
Democrats have homed in on abortion and protections under the Affordable Care Act as issues that could unify their caucus and potentially persuade Republican Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOn unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Trump escalates border fight with emergency declaration On The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week MORE (Alaska) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTexas senator introduces bill to produce coin honoring Bushes GOP Green New Deal stunt is a great deal for Democrats On unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 MORE (Maine) to vote against Trump's nominee.
 
Schumer added on Monday night that with Kavanaugh's nomination, reproductive rights and health-care protections are "on the judicial chopping block."
 
"Judge Kavanaugh got the nomination because he passed this litmus test, not because he’ll be an impartial judge on behalf of all Americans," Schumer said. "If he were to be confirmed, women’s reproductive rights would be in the hands of five men on the Supreme Court."
 
“If Americans believe in a woman’s right to make her own reproductive choices, and that health insurance companies shouldn’t be able to charge people more based on pre-existing conditions, now is the time to fight," he added.