Senate takes symbolic shot at Trump tariffs
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The Senate on Wednesday took a symbolic shot at President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump announces new social media network called 'TRUTH Social' Virginia State Police investigating death threat against McAuliffe Meadows hires former deputy AG to represent him in Jan. 6 probe: report MORE’s trade policy amid anxiety on Capitol Hill over his tariff strategy.

Senators voted 88-11 to instruct lawmakers hashing out a deal on a government funding bill to include language “providing a role for Congress” on tariffs implemented for national security reasons, known as Section 232 of the trade laws.

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The vote is nonbinding, meaning lawmakers don’t have to add trade language into the funding bill. But the vote margin, with more senators supporting it than the amount needed to override a veto, underscores the depth of concern on Capitol Hill.

“I think it’s significant that, as many of us have discussed with the president and his Cabinet, that there’s some anxiety about ... tariffs,” Senate Majority Whip John CornynJohn CornynCornyn raises more than M for Senate GOP Is the Biden administration afraid of trade? The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - After high drama, Senate lifts debt limit MORE (R-Texas) told The Hill. “I think it’s just a way to make that point.”

Trump’s trade policies have sparked backlash from lawmakers.

The president used Section 232 to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, including slapping the financial penalties on key trading allies like the European Union, Canada and Mexico.

But Republicans have been wary of using legislation to push back against Trump months before the midterm elections.

Senate Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP How leaving Afghanistan cancels our post-9/11 use of force The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE (R-Tenn.) tried to attach legislation requiring congressional approval for tariffs applied for national security reasons to both a defense policy bill and the farm bill, but was blocked both times.

Corker said after the vote that he would keep pressing for the Senate to pass stand-alone legislation on Trump's tariff authority. 

"I believe support for our legislation will only grow. We will continue to push for a binding vote and are hopeful one will be scheduled in the near future," Corker said in a statement. 

Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) — who was opposing Trump's appeals court judges over the tariff fight — added that Congress has "to rein in abuse of presidential authority and restore Congress’ constitutional authority in this regard.”

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchLobbying world Congress, stop holding 'Dreamers' hostage Drug prices are declining amid inflation fears MORE (R-Utah) has said he will bring up tariff legislation in the committee. Some GOP senators on the panel have voiced support for narrowing Section 232 of the trade law.

Trump allies have warned lawmakers from passing legislation, arguing it would undercut the president’s negotiating ability.

Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.) knocked senators shortly before the vote, saying they were tying Trump’s hands.

“I just don’t understand why this body continues to try to tie the hands of this president at every turn," he said. "This president is committed to creating a more level playing field for our workers and our companies here at home to compete.” 

Perdue was one of 11 Republican senators who voted no. GOP Sens. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoSenate appears poised to advance first Native American to lead National Park Service Sunday shows preview: Senate votes to raise debt ceiling; Facebook whistleblower blasts company during testimony The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - After high drama, Senate lifts debt limit MORE (Wyo.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoBiden's soft touch with Manchin, Sinema frustrates Democrats The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - After high drama, Senate lifts debt limit Here are the 11 GOP senators who helped advance the debt extension MORE (W.Va.), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoDemocrats narrow scope of IRS proposal amid GOP attacks Senate GOP signals they'll help bail out Biden's Fed chair Yellen confident of minimum global corporate tax passage in Congress MORE (Idaho), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziCheney on same-sex marriage opposition: 'I was wrong' What Republicans should demand in exchange for raising the debt ceiling Senate votes to end debate on T infrastructure bill MORE (Wyo.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamMayorkas tests positive for COVID-19 breakthrough case A pandemic of hyper-hypocrisy is infecting American politics Republicans' mantra should have been 'Stop the Spread' MORE (S.C.), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerNevada becomes early Senate battleground Nevada governor Sisolak injured in car accident, released from hospital Democrats brace for tough election year in Nevada MORE (Nev.), Cindy Hyde-Smith (Miss.), James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeOvernight Defense & National Security — Presented by Raytheon Technologies — Navy probe reveals disastrous ship fire response Sailors didn't know what to do in USS Bonhomme Richard fire, Navy probe finds Pentagon says almost half of Afghan evacuees at US bases are children MORE (Okla.), Jim RischJim Elroy RischBiden pick for China envoy raises concern over nuclear buildup State watchdog to launch review of Biden's Afghanistan withdrawal Defense & National Security — Military starts giving guidance on COVID-19 vaccine refusals MORE (Idaho) and Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottTim Scott takes in .3 million in third quarter Nikki Haley gets lifetime post on Clemson Board of Trustees First senator formally endorses Bass in LA mayoral bid MORE (S.C.) also voted no. 

Updated at 1:41 p.m.