Lawmakers offer support for McCain after he discontinues cancer treatment
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Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle are rushing to offer their support after GOP Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainPoll: Sinema approval higher among Arizona Republicans than Democrats Meghan McCain: COVID-19 battle made me doubt if nation will recover from pandemic Biden's year two won't be about bipartisanship  MORE's (Ariz.) family announced he has decided to end medical treatment more than a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer.

Several of McCain's Senate colleagues quickly took to social media to react to the announcement, offering their "thoughts and prayers" for the 81-year-old senator who has been absent from Washington since December.

"Very sad to hear this morning’s update from the family of our dear friend. ... We are so fortunate to call him our friend and colleague. John, Cindy, and the entire McCain family are in our prayers at this incredibly difficult hour," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSchumer vows to vote on Biden Supreme Court pick with 'all deliberate speed' It's time for 'Uncle Joe' to take off the gloves against Manchin and Sinema Democrats should ignore Senators Manchin and Sinema MORE (R-Ky.) said in a tweet.

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Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerSchumer vows to vote on Biden Supreme Court pick with 'all deliberate speed' Voting rights failed in the Senate — where do we go from here? Forced deadline spurs drastic tactic in Congress MORE (D-N.Y.) added: "My thoughts and prayers are with Senator McCain and his family."

Members of the House, where McCain briefly served before becoming a senator, also weighed in, with House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanHow Kevin McCarthy sold his soul to Donald Trump On The Trail: Retirements offer window into House Democratic mood Stopping the next insurrection MORE (R-Wis.) saying McCain "personifies service to our country."

"The whole House is keeping John and his family in our prayers during this time," he said.

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeOvernight Defense & National Security — White House raises new alarm over Russia Biden sparks confusion, cleanup on Russia-Ukraine remarks Republicans say Mayorkas failed to deliver report on evacuated Afghans MORE (R-Okla.), who has served in McCain's role as chairman of the Armed Services Committee in the senator's absence, said his prayers are with the family "during this difficult time."  

McCain was first elected to the Senate in 1986 and is widely respected by his colleagues on both sides of the aisle, who recently passed a mammoth defense policy bill named after him.

"God bless and keep this wonderful man and his family," GOP Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeFlake meets with Erdoğan in first official duties as US ambassador Poll: Sinema approval higher among Arizona Republicans than Democrats Cruz to get Nord Stream 2 vote as part of deal on Biden nominees MORE (Ariz.) said in a tweet. Flake previously confronted Trump during a 2016 closed-door GOP caucus lunch because of the then-candidate's mocking of McCain.

"One of the true honors of my life has been having @SenJohnMcCain as a friend & mentor. He’s a true American hero. His courage & indomitable spirit have inspired millions in America & across the globe. I humbly ask all Americans to pray for him & his loving family. Semper Fi John," GOP Sen. Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanSenate confirms Rahm Emanuel to be ambassador to Japan GOP resistance to Biden FCC nominee could endanger board's Democratic majority Man charged with threatening Alaska senators pleads not guilty MORE (Alaska) said in a tweet.

GOP Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Schumer makes plea for voting bill, filibuster reform in rare Friday session Jan. 6 brings Democrats, Cheneys together — with GOP mostly absent MORE (Ga.) added that the country owes McCain a "debt of gratitude."

Democratic Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDocumentary to be released on Gabby Giffords's recovery from shooting Tlaib blasts Biden judicial nominee whose firm sued environmental lawyer The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Connected Commerce Council - Biden faces reporters as his agenda teeters MORE (N.Y.) added: Thank you for your courage, and for your extraordinary service and leadership."

In addition to senators, congressional staffers also began sharing their memories of McCain.

Kevin Bishop — a spokesman for GOP Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamClyburn predicts Supreme Court contender J. Michelle Childs would get GOP votes The names to know as Biden mulls Breyer's replacement Schumer vows to vote on Biden Supreme Court pick with 'all deliberate speed' MORE (S.C.), a close friend and Senate ally of McCain's — recalled a CNN town hall the two senators did together.

McCain was diagnosed in July 2017 with an aggressive form of brain cancer, which was discovered after he had surgery to remove a clot above his eye.

"In the year since, John has surpassed expectations for his survival. But the progress of disease and the inexorable advance of age render their verdict. With his usual strength of will, he has now chosen to discontinue medical treatment," McCain's family said in a statement released by his office on Friday.