Lawmakers offer support for McCain after he discontinues cancer treatment
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Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle are rushing to offer their support after GOP Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMark Kelly's campaign raises over M in days after launching Senate bid The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Lawmakers wait for Trump's next move on border deal Mark Kelly launches Senate bid in Arizona MORE's (Ariz.) family announced he has decided to end medical treatment more than a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer.

Several of McCain's Senate colleagues quickly took to social media to react to the announcement, offering their "thoughts and prayers" for the 81-year-old senator who has been absent from Washington since December.

"Very sad to hear this morning’s update from the family of our dear friend. ... We are so fortunate to call him our friend and colleague. John, Cindy, and the entire McCain family are in our prayers at this incredibly difficult hour," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGreen New Deal Resolution invites big picture governing ‘Contingency’ spending in 3B budget deal comes under fire Coulter defends Paul Ryan: This is 100 percent Trump's fault MORE (R-Ky.) said in a tweet.

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Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerHouse Judiciary Dems seek answers over Trump's national emergency declaration Mandatory E-Verify: The other border wall Trump says he 'didn't need to' declare emergency but wanted 'faster' action MORE (D-N.Y.) added: "My thoughts and prayers are with Senator McCain and his family."

Members of the House, where McCain briefly served before becoming a senator, also weighed in, with House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanUnscripted Trump keeps audience guessing in Rose Garden Coulter defends Paul Ryan: This is 100 percent Trump's fault The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Trump escalates border fight with emergency declaration MORE (R-Wis.) saying McCain "personifies service to our country."

"The whole House is keeping John and his family in our prayers during this time," he said.

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeOn The Money: Trump to sign border deal, declare emergency to build wall | Senate passes funding bill, House to follow | Dems promise challenge to emergency declaration Trump to sign border deal, declare national emergency Foreign Affairs chairman: US military intervention in Venezuela 'not an option' MORE (R-Okla.), who has served in McCain's role as chairman of the Armed Services Committee in the senator's absence, said his prayers are with the family "during this difficult time."  

McCain was first elected to the Senate in 1986 and is widely respected by his colleagues on both sides of the aisle, who recently passed a mammoth defense policy bill named after him.

"God bless and keep this wonderful man and his family," GOP Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Live coverage: Trump delivers State of the Union Sasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger MORE (Ariz.) said in a tweet. Flake previously confronted Trump during a 2016 closed-door GOP caucus lunch because of the then-candidate's mocking of McCain.

"One of the true honors of my life has been having @SenJohnMcCain as a friend & mentor. He’s a true American hero. His courage & indomitable spirit have inspired millions in America & across the globe. I humbly ask all Americans to pray for him & his loving family. Semper Fi John," GOP Sen. Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanAlaska in lockdown over leadership stalemate Bennet gives emotional speech ripping into Cruz over shutdown Trump tells GOP senators he’s sticking to Syria and Afghanistan pullout  MORE (Alaska) said in a tweet.

GOP Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonOn The Money: Lawmakers wait for Trump verdict on border deal | Trump touts deal as offering B for security | McConnell presses Trump to sign off | National debt tops T | Watchdog details IRS shutdown woes Trump criticizes border wall deal: 'Can't say I'm happy' GOP senators offer praise for Klobuchar: 'She’s the whole package' MORE (Ga.) added that the country owes McCain a "debt of gratitude."

Democratic Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandNewsom endorses Kamala Harris for president Trump tweets video mocking Dems not cheering during State of the Union Omar: Next president should declare national emergency on climate change ‘on day 1’ MORE (N.Y.) added: Thank you for your courage, and for your extraordinary service and leadership."

In addition to senators, congressional staffers also began sharing their memories of McCain.

Kevin Bishop — a spokesman for GOP Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Memo: Trump and McCabe go to war Graham seeks new Rosenstein testimony after explosive McCabe interview Senate confirms Trump pick William Barr as new attorney general MORE (S.C.), a close friend and Senate ally of McCain's — recalled a CNN town hall the two senators did together.

McCain was diagnosed in July 2017 with an aggressive form of brain cancer, which was discovered after he had surgery to remove a clot above his eye.

"In the year since, John has surpassed expectations for his survival. But the progress of disease and the inexorable advance of age render their verdict. With his usual strength of will, he has now chosen to discontinue medical treatment," McCain's family said in a statement released by his office on Friday.