Senate cuts work week short after nominations deal
© Greg Nash
Senators wrapped up their work week early after they got a deal on dozens of Trump nominations. 
 
The Senate agreed to leave town on Tuesday night after they confirmed more than 30 of President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrat calls on White House to withdraw ambassador to Belarus nominee TikTok collected data from mobile devices to track Android users: report Peterson wins Minnesota House primary in crucial swing district MORE's picks, including 27 executive branch nominees and seven judicial nominations. 
 
Senators won't formally return to Washington until next Tuesday, Sept. 4. 
 
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GOP leadership had threatened to keep the Senate in session for as long as it took this week to confirm another slate of Trump's nominees, after they left town last week unable to get a deal.
 
But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell warns control of Senate 'could go either way' in November On The Money: McConnell says it's time to restart coronavirus talks | New report finds majority of Americans support merger moratorium | Corporate bankruptcies on pace for 10-year high McConnell: Time to restart coronavirus talks MORE (R-Ky.) indicated after a closed-door caucus lunch that he was in talks with Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerLawmakers push Trump to restore full funding for National Guards responding to pandemic Bipartisan senators ask congressional leadership to extend census deadline Lawmakers of color urge Democratic leadership to protect underserved communities in coronavirus talks MORE (D-N.Y.) to clear a tranche of Trump nominees. 
 
"Sen. Schumer and I are also talking about a package related to the offer that I made him at the end of last week with regard to processing 15 district judges and several members of the administration," McConnell told reporters. 
 
In addition to the 34 confirmed on Tuesday, Republicans say they have an agreement with Democrats to take up an additional eight judicial nominations when they return to Washington next week. 
 
Sen. John CornynJohn CornynThree pros and three cons to Biden picking Harris The Hill's 12:30 Report - Speculation over Biden's running mate announcement Davis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump MORE (R-Texas), asked how they got the deal with Democrats, noted that the list of nominations were picked because they "had strong, bipartisan support." 
 
"I think [Democrats] realized it was going to happen sooner or later and they could do it the hard way or the easy way," he said.
 
The agreement got backlash from some activists, who argued that Democrats were making it easier for Trump to make lifetime appointments. 
 
"This comes down to leadership. Senate Dem leaders could take a stand and station one senator on the floor at all times to object, forcing McConnell to jump through interminable hurdles & produce 51 votes - twice - for each nominee, likely resulting in fewer lifetime Trump judges," Adam Jentleson, who worked for former Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidKamala Harris makes history — as a Westerner McConnell goes hands-off on coronavirus relief bill Kamala Harris to young Black women at conference: 'I want you to be ambitious' MORE (D-Nev.), said in a tweet after the votes were announced. 

But the push to get a deal also comes as memorials for GOP Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainSarah Palin offers Harris advice: 'Don't get muzzled' McSally gaining ground on Kelly in Arizona Senate race: poll Davis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump MORE (Ariz.) are expected to start in Arizona on Wednesday before moving to D.C. later in the week.
 
Clearing the Senate's deck of nominations could allow lawmakers to travel to Arizona without worrying about missing votes and hearings in D.C.