Several Democratic senators are coming off the fence to announce they will oppose President TrumpDonald John TrumpGillibrand backs federal classification of third gender: report Former Carter pollster, Bannon ally Patrick Caddell dies at 68 Heather Nauert withdraws her name from consideration for UN Ambassador job MORE's second Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh. 

Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenCongress must step up to protect Medicare home health care Dems slam EPA plan for fighting drinking water contaminants Bipartisan Senators reintroduce legislation to slap new sanctions on Russia MORE (N.H.), Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Dems blast rulemaking on family planning program | Facebook may remove anti-vaccine content | Medicare proposes coverage for new cancer treatment Trade official warns senators of obstacles to quick China deal Actor Chris Evans meets with Democratic senators before State of the Union MORE (N.H.) and Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehousePence met with silence after mentioning Trump in Munich speech New battle lines in war over Trump’s judicial picks Dems probing whether NRA made illegal contributions to Trump MORE (R.I.) became the latest Democrats to say they will vote against Kavanaugh. Both senators announced their opposition on Monday. 

"While much of Judge Kavanaugh’s record remains a mystery, what we do know is extremely troubling and dangerously out of step with the American people, particularly on critical issues including executive power, abortion rights and pre-existing conditions," Shaheen said in a statement. 

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She added that Kavanaugh's "inability to remember if he has discussed the Special Counsel’s investigation with President Trump’s defense team is extremely alarming."

Hassan also pointed to the impact Kavanaugh could have on Roe v. Wade, the 1973 case that established the right to an abortion, and executive authority, where Democrats worry Kavanaugh would give Trump a wide berth. 

"We need to be clear that Judge Kavanaugh, the people who have promoted him throughout his career and who precleared his nomination, and President Trump could all lead us down a path toward further criminalizing abortion," Hassan wrote in a Medium post announcing her opposition. 

Whitehouse, a member of the Judiciary Committee, said that Kavanaugh "ducked" their questions last week and failed to reassure lawmakers. 

“The Supreme Court needs to stand alone, tall and independent, and Americans should feel confident their cases will be decided on the merits. ...  Judge Kavanaugh has failed to give Americans that assurance, and he will not get my vote," he said. 

Kavanaugh, if confirmed, is expected to tilt the Supreme Court to the right for decades by providing Republicans with a more conservative justice comparable to Anthony Kennedy, who was the court's swing vote and who Kavanaugh would succeed. 

In addition to Shaheen and Hassan, Democratic Sens. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Defense: Trump declares border emergency | .6B in military construction funds to be used for wall | Trump believes Obama would have started war with North Korea | Pentagon delivers aid for Venezuelan migrants Kaine asks Shanahan if military families would be hurt by moving .6B for border wall Clinton on GOP promoting Trump 'stronger together' quote: Now copy my policies too MORE (Va.) and Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinBipartisan Senators reintroduce legislation to slap new sanctions on Russia Baseball legend Frank Robinson, first black manager in MLB, dies at 83 Biden speaking to Dems on Capitol Hill as 2020 speculation mounts: report MORE (Md.) said on Friday that they would oppose Kavanaugh. 

As the party's 2016 vice presidential nominee, Kaine had drawn criticism from progressives for staying on the fence.

Kaine said in a statement that a Supreme Court justice needs "independence," predicting that Trump would spark "an avalanche of litigation" that could work its way up to the court. 

"This nomination — in a manner unique in our history — is akin to a President picking a juror for his own trial. And thus the stakes are high — we must make sure that the nominee has the character of independence that the Framers sought when they designed our government," Kaine said. 

Kavanaugh only needs a simple majority to be confirmed in the Senate after Republicans nixed the 60-vote filibuster for Supreme Court nominees last year, meaning Democrats can't block him on their own. 

Each of the Democrats who have announced their opposition since the hearing were widely expected to be "no" votes.

Instead, the fight will come down to a handful of moderate senators who have yet to announce how they'll vote. 

Democratic Sens. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSenate confirms Trump pick William Barr as new attorney general GOP wants to pit Ocasio-Cortez against Democrats in the Senate Senate poised to confirm Trump’s attorney general pick MORE (W.Va), Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampOvernight Energy: Trump taps ex-oil lobbyist Bernhardt to lead Interior | Bernhardt slams Obama officials for agency's ethics issues | Head of major green group steps down Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary On The Money: Shutdown Day 27 | Trump fires back at Pelosi by canceling her foreign travel | Dems blast 'petty' move | Trump also cancels delegation to Davos | House votes to disapprove of Trump lifting Russia sanction MORE (N.D.) and Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyOvernight Energy: Trump taps ex-oil lobbyist Bernhardt to lead Interior | Bernhardt slams Obama officials for agency's ethics issues | Head of major green group steps down Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary EPA's Wheeler faces grilling over rule rollbacks MORE (Ind.) are seen as the Democrats most likely to vote "yes" on Kavanaugh. Several other red- and purple-state Democrats — including Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.), who wasn't in the Senate for the Gorsuch fight — also remain undecided. 

Meanwhile, Democrats' best shot at picking up the two GOP votes they need to sink Kavanaugh's nomination are GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsCongress must step up to protect Medicare home health care Business, conservative groups slam Trump’s national emergency declaration The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Trump escalates border fight with emergency declaration MORE (Maine) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Trump escalates border fight with emergency declaration On The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the American Academy of HIV Medicine — Trump, Congress prepare for new border wall fight MORE (Alaska). 

The two are viewed as potential swing votes because they've previously broken with their party on ObamaCare repeal, abortion legislation and other Trump nominees, including Education Secretary Betsy DeVosElizabeth (Betsy) Dee DeVosStudents call on DeVos to offer free tampons, pads in schools to address 'period poverty' DeVos recovering from broken pelvis, hip socket after bicycle accident Student veterans deserve better than the DeVos agenda MORE

Democrats were hoping that a renewed focus on Kavanaugh's position on abortion would help sway the two senators. They've seized on a 2003 email where Kavanaugh suggested cutting a paragraph out of a draft op-ed that charactered Roe v. Wade as widely accepted as "settled" law. 

Murkowski was expected to review the email over the weekend. Meanwhile, Collins told reporters on Friday that it was "obvious" that he was editing an op-ed. 

"It’s obvious to me that he was editing an op-ed piece and he said something that is accurate, which is not all legal scholars would agree that Roe v. Wade was precedent, binding precedent," Collins said. 

Democrats have also focused their fire on Republicans' handling of documents from Kavanaugh's time working in the George W. Bush White House. Republicans refused to request documents from the three year period Kavanaugh served as staff secretary. 

Senators have been getting documents from Kavanaugh's work as a White House lawyer from a legal team working for Bush. The National Archives is sorting through the same paperwork but told Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyHigh stakes as Trump, Dems open drug price talks Senate approves border bill that prevents shutdown Grassley raises voice after McConnell interrupts Senate speech MORE (R-Iowa) that it wouldn't be able to complete his request until late October. 

Democrats argue the setup allows Republicans to cherry pick what information gets publicly released before the Senate's vote on Kavanaugh, which is expected to take place later this month. 

Shaheen added on Monday that senators could not fulfill their "advise and consent" duties without viewing all of Kavanaugh's record. 

"The lack of documentation production and the nominee’s refusal to answer basic questions ... make it impossible to conclude anything other than the Senate Majority and Judge Kavanaugh are deliberately concealing his record from the American people," she said. 

—Updated at 5:36 p.m.