Kavanaugh explains 'abortion-inducing drugs' remark amid backlash
© Greg Nash

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh told senators that he was summarizing the plaintiffs' views in an ObamaCare case when he referred to birth control as "abortion-inducing drugs."

Kavanaugh's use of the phrase during his confirmation hearing sparked days of backlash from Democrats and progressive groups, who argued the Supreme Court pick was trying to signal his own views.

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But Kavanaugh, in written responses provided to the Senate Judiciary Committee, told senators that the phrase, "abortion-inducing drugs," summarized the plaintiffs' position, stating "I was accurately describing the plaintiffs’ position." 

"At the hearing, I was not expressing an opinion on whether particular drugs induce abortion; I used that phrase only when recount the plaintiffs’ own assertions," Kavanaugh wrote in a response to Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyDems angered by GOP plan to hold judicial hearings in October American Bar Association dropping Kavanaugh review Clinton's security clearance withdrawn at her request MORE (R-Iowa) about his use of the phrase. 

Kavanaugh gave a similar answer later in a written response to Democratic Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoKavanaugh tensions linger after bitter fight Chris Cuomo: Presumption of innocence didn't apply to Kavanaugh because it wasn't a court case Lindsey Graham hits Dem senator: 'The Hirono standard is horrific' MORE (Hawaii). Hirono asked Kavanaugh if, regardless of whether the term was used by a party, he believed that birth control or contraceptives are "abortion-inducing drugs."

Kavanaugh doubled down on his response to Grassley in responding to Hirono's question.

The Supreme Court nominee sparked a political firestorm when he used the phrase "abortion-inducing drugs" last week during his marathon confirmation hearing. The phrase came as part of Kavanaugh's response to a question from Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzBeto O'Rourke will not share million he raised with other Dem Senate candidates Election Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight Donald Trump Jr. blasts Beto O’Rourke: ‘Irish guy pretending to be Hispanic’ MORE (R-Texas) about his opinion in a case — Priests for Life v. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Kavanaugh dissented from the D.C Circuit’s decision not to rehear a challenge religious employers brought against the Affordable Care Act’s contraception coverage requirement.

"It was a technical matter of filling out a form in that case. In that case, they said filling out the form would make them complicit in the provision of the abortion-inducing drugs that they were, as a religious matter, objected to," Kavanaugh told Cruz.

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) quickly pounced on Kavanaugh's word choice in a tweet, but was later criticized for taking his comments out of context.

Washington Post fact-checker Glenn Kessler awarded Harris "four Pinocchios" for not making it clear Kavanaugh was describing the views of the plaintiffs in the case, not his own.

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonCarter Page files defamation lawsuit against DNC Dems fear party is headed to gutter from Avenatti’s sledgehammer approach Election Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight MORE echoed Harris's criticism in a series of tweets Wednesday, claiming the comment shows Kavanaugh’s extremist ideology.

“Kavanaugh didn't use that term because he misunderstands the basic science of birth control — the fact that birth control prevents fertilization of eggs in the first place. He used that term because it's a dog whistle to the extreme right,” the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee tweeted.