McConnell slams anti-Kavanaugh protests, 'intimidation tactics'
© Anna Moneymaker

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report - Dem candidates sell policy as smart politics Overnight Defense: Trump ends sanctions waivers for buying Iranian oil | At least four Americans killed in Sri Lanka attacks | Sanders pushes for Yemen veto override vote McConnell: 'Time to move on' from Trump impeachment talk MORE (R-Ky.) on Wednesday slammed protesters who are increasingly confronting GOP senators over Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, warning it won't prevent the Senate from voting.

"If facts and evidence couldn't get the job done, then intimidation tactics and bullying would have to do. ... The far left tried to bully and intimidate members of this body, Republican United States senators," McConnell said from the Senate floor.

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McConnell noted in an apparent reference to GOP Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzMJ Hegar announces Texas Senate bid Liberal survey: Sanders cruising, Buttigieg rising Overnight Defense: Trump ends sanctions waivers for buying Iranian oil | At least four Americans killed in Sri Lanka attacks | Sanders pushes for Yemen veto override vote MORE (Texas) that one senator and their family "were effectively run out of a restaurant in recent days by these people."

"Another reported having protesters physically block his car door. And some have seen organized far-left protestors camp out at their homes," McConnell continued.

Cruz and his wife, Heidi Cruz, were confronted by anti-Kavanaugh protesters at a D.C. restaurant. They later returned to finish their meal. Protesters on Capitol Hill have also tailed senators coming in and out of unrelated committee hearings in public Senate office buildings this week.

McConnell himself and Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerPollster says Trump unlikely to face 'significant' primary challenge GOP gets used to saying 'no' to Trump Democrats introduce bill to rein in Trump on tariffs MORE (R-Tenn.) were both confronted by women who identified themselves as survivors of sexual assault associated with an advocacy group opposed to Kavanaugh's nomination at Reagan National Airport near Washington, D.C., on Monday.

"I'm not suggesting we're the victims here ... but I want to make it clear to these people who are chasing my members around the hall here or harassing them at the airports or going to their homes we're not going to be intimidated by these people," McConnell said.

McConnell's comments come as the Senate is preparing to vote on Kavanaugh's nomination this week. The vote has been delayed to give the FBI time to investigate sexual misconduct allegations against the nominee, which Kavanaugh has denied. The exact timing of the vote is unclear because McConnell has not yet filed cloture on the nomination, which would set in motion an initial vote on ending debate.

Kavanaugh remains short of the simple majority needed to be confirmed.

Republicans hold a 51-49 majority and can only lose one GOP senator before they need help to confirm Kavanaugh.

Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsMcConnell pledges to be 'Grim Reaper' for progressive policies Senate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller Collins: Mueller report includes 'an unflattering portrayal' of Trump MORE (R-Maine), Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakePollster says Trump unlikely to face 'significant' primary challenge Trump gives nod to vulnerable GOP Sen. McSally with bill signing Flake opens up about threats against him and his family MORE (Ariz.) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOn The Money: Cain withdraws from Fed consideration | Says he didn't want 'pay cut' | Trump sues to block subpoena for financial records | Dems plot next move in Trump tax-return battle Cain withdraws from Fed consideration Cain says he 'won't run away from criticism' in push for Fed seat MORE (Alaska) remain undecided.

Most Democrats are expected to oppose Kavanaugh. Sens. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampPro-trade groups enlist another ex-Dem lawmaker to push for Trump's NAFTA replacement Pro-trade group targets 4 lawmakers in push for new NAFTA Biden office highlights support from women after second accuser comes forward MORE (D-N.D.) and Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinCain says he withdrew from Fed consideration because of 'pay cut' On The Money: Cain 'very committed' to Fed bid despite opposition | Pelosi warns no US-UK trade deal if Brexit harms Irish peace | Ivanka Trump says she turned down World Bank job Cain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed MORE (D-W.Va.) remain undecided.