Senate Democrats quickly hit back Monday at President TrumpDonald John TrumpCould Donald Trump and Boris Johnson be this generation's Reagan-Thatcher? Merkel backs Democratic congresswomen over Trump How China's currency manipulation cheats America on trade MORE's suggestion that "rogue killers" could be behind the disappearance of a U.S.-based journalist, calling his remarks "insulting" and comparing him to a "PR agent" for Saudi Arabia. 
 
Trump told reporters at the White House that "rogue killers," and not Saudi officials, could be responsible for Washington Post contributor Jamal Khashoggi's disappearance, noting that he had just spoken with Saudi King Salman, who denied Riyadh's involvement.
 
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"Been hearing the ridiculous 'rogue killers' theory was where the Saudis would go with this. Absolutely extaordinary they were able to enlist the President of the United States as their PR agent to float it," Murphy said in a tweet
 
 
"President Trump’s response to Jamal Khashoggi’s disappearance reveals a man more willing to trust authoritarian leaders than reliable intelligence," Kaine said.
 
 
"Orders must have come from the top. The U.S. must not be complicit in an effort to cover-up this heinous crime," he said. 
 
Khashoggi has been missing since Oct. 2, when he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to get paperwork needed for his marriage. Turkish officials have said they believe Khashoggi was killed and dismembered inside the consulate on orders of the government in Riyadh.
 
Saudi Arabia has denied wrongdoing and said Khashoggi left the consulate shortly after he arrived, but hasn't provided any evidence to support that claim. 
 
Trump on Monday said King Salman's denial "was very, very strong" and it did not seem as if "there was a question" in the king's mind about his claim Saudi Arabia was not involved.
 
But Khashoggi's disappearance has put a new strain on the U.S.-Saudi relationship, with Trump facing bipartisan pressure from Congress to enact swift punishment on Riyadh if officials there can't provide evidence that Khashoggi is still alive. 
 
Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRepublican lawmakers ask Trump not to delay Pentagon cloud-computing contract Overnight Defense: US shoots down Iranian drone | Pentagon sending 500 more troops to Saudi Arabia | Trump mulls Turkey sanctions | Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract EU official in Canada says he feels 'at home' there because no one was shouting 'send him back' MORE (R-Fla.), a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, told CNN on Sunday that the United States can't continue "business as usual" with Saudi Arabia if it is responsible for murdering Khashoggi and "every option" should be on the table for how the U.S. responds.
 
 
"If it's found that they, as everything indicates today ... murdered a journalist, that will hugely change our relationship. I mean, there's no question about it," Corker told reporters at the time.
 
He added that while he hopes Khashoggi is found alive, or sequestered somewhere, "everything points to the fact that ... this was something that was thought out and done and that's he's not alive anymore."