Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeAnti-gun violence organization endorses Kelly's Senate bid Arpaio considering running for former sheriff job after Trump pardon Overnight Energy: Warren edges past Sanders in poll of climate-focused voters | Carbon tax shows new signs of life | Greens fuming at Trump plans for development at Bears Ears monument MORE (R-Ariz.) said Friday that he believes legislation protecting special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE could pass the Senate, if Republican leadership would agree to bring it up for a vote.

"I do believe the votes are there on the floor if we can just get a vote, and that's what I'm calling, let's just have a vote," Flake told CNN, asked about a measure that would protect Mueller from being fired without good cause. 
 
The legislation — crafted by Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerOvernight Defense: Two US service members killed in Afghanistan | Trump calls on other nations to take up fight against ISIS | Pentagon scraps billion-dollar missile defense program ABC unveils moderators for third Democratic debate Sanders targets gig economy as part of new labor plan MORE (D-N.J.), Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsThe United States broken patent system is getting worse Biden faces scrutiny for his age from other Democrats Democrats press FBI for details on Kavanaugh investigation MORE (D-Del.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisThe United States broken patent system is getting worse Gun reform groups to pressure GOP senators with rallies in all 50 states To cash in on innovation, remove market barriers for advanced energy technologies MORE (R-N.C.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP group calls on Republican senators to stand up to McConnell on election security in new ads Cindy McCain says no one in Republican Party carries 'voice of reason' after husband's death Trump says he'll decide on foreign aid cuts within a week MORE (R-S.C.) — has languished for months after it passed out the Judiciary Committee. Republican leadership argues it isn't necessary because President TrumpDonald John TrumpSarah Huckabee Sanders becomes Fox News contributor The US-Iranian scuffle over a ship is a sideshow to events in the Gulf South Korea: US, North Korea to resume nuclear talks 'soon' MORE, they believe, will not try to interfere with or fire Mueller. 
 
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"I don't know how we can be sanguine about what's going on over at the Department of Justice in terms of the Mueller probe. It's important to protect it," Flake added on Friday. 
 
Flake, joined by Coons and Booker, have gone to the Senate floor twice this month to try to get a vote and have been blocked both times. Senate Majority Whip John CornynJohn CornynThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump hews to NRA on guns and eyes lower taxes The Hill's Morning Report - Trump on defense over economic jitters Democrats keen to take on Cornyn despite formidable challenges MORE (R-Texas) said this week that the Senate GOP is measuring support for the legislation, but noted there are still objections to the bill within the caucus. 
 
Flake is pledging to oppose all of Trump's judicial nominees until he gets a vote on the bill, rankling his colleagues who have made confirming the president's picks their top priority. 
 
Flake and Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottIt's time to empower military families with education freedom GOP Sen. Tim Scott says if he runs in 2022 it will be his last race When it comes to student debt, it is time to talk solutions MORE (R-S.C.) are joining all 49 Democrats to oppose Thomas Farr's district judge nomination, denying him the 50 votes needed to let Vice President Pence break a tie. 
 
Flake's opposition is more problematic for Republicans on the Judiciary Committee, where they have a 11-10 majority. Unless Republicans can flip a Democrat on the committee, Flake's opposition leaves them unable to advance the president's nominees out of the panel by the end of the year.
 
 
"We need to protect the special counsel, it's important. Confirming judges is important," Flake, who is retiring at the end of this Congress, said. "I want to confirm more judges ... but this has to be priority now. And you have to take a stand. I have leverage because we have a narrow majority on the Judiciary Committee, so I'm using it."