Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerBrexit and exit: A transatlantic comparison Sasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger RNC votes to give Trump 'undivided support' ahead of 2020 MORE (R-Tenn.) said on Monday evening that he is planning to introduce a resolution that would name Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman as "responsible" for the death of Washington Post contributor Jamal Khashoggi. 

"It holds [the crown prince] responsible for the killing. ... That's a strong statement by Republicans," Corker said, asked about the resolution. "A strong denouncing of a crown prince and holding them responsible for the murder of a journalist. It's a pretty strong statement for the United States Senate to be making, assuming we can get a vote on it." 
 
 
Corker is hoping to bypass the committee process on Tuesday and place the resolution directly on the Senate calendar. The procedural leapfrogging would make his nonbinding resolution available for, but doesn't guarantee, a vote on the Senate floor. 
 
"I hope it's something that will be massively supported by the Senate. I think it will be," Corker said. "I can't imagine who would not support it." 
 
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Corker has been negotiating with leadership for days as he tries to craft a sense of the Senate resolution that would have enough support to let leadership bring it up for a vote quickly. Congress has less than two weeks before they are expected to wrap for the year. 
 
A bipartisan group of senators, led by Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamCNN anchor hits Trump: He didn't go to Vietnam 'until he was in his 70s' with 'Secret Service protection' Trump reignites criticism of McCain months after senator's death Graham defends McCain amid Trump attacks: 'Nothing about his service will ever be changed' MORE (R-S.C.), introduced a resolution last week that would find the Saudi crown prince to be "complicit" in Khashoggi's death. But Corker indicated last week that he was working on his own measure, telling reporters that if senators could find the "right balance" on a Senate resolution it could clear the way for a quick vote. 
 
"It's also written in a way that I think there will be a very, very large vote," Corker added on Monday about his forthcoming resolution. 
 
Corker's resolution comes as the Senate is searching for how to respond to Khashoggi's killing amid growing frustration with the U.S.-Saudi relationship on Capitol Hill. 
 
The Senate is expected to take up a resolution, spearheaded by Sens. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyDems shift strategy for securing gun violence research funds The Hill's 12:30 Report: O'Rourke jumps into 2020 fray Overnight Defense: Senate breaks with Trump on Yemen war | Shanahan hit with ethics complaint over Boeing ties | Pentagon rolls out order to implement transgender ban | Dem chair throws cold water on Space Force budget MORE (D-Conn.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeThe 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration Dems prepare next steps after Trump's veto Overnight Defense: Senate rejects border emergency in rebuke to Trump | Acting Pentagon chief grilled on wall funding | Warren confronts chief over war fund budget MORE (R-Utah) and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersO'Rourke faces pressure from left on 'Medicare for all' O'Rourke says he won't use 'f-word' on campaign trail O'Rourke not planning, but not ruling out big fundraisers MORE (I-Vt.), on Wednesday aimed at ending U.S. support for the Saudi-led military campaign in Yemen. 
 
But most Republicans won't support the Yemen resolution and House GOP leadership has given no indication they plan to move it if it passes the Senate.
 
Corker added that he hadn't spoken with House leadership about his own measure but had made a point of negotiating with Senate GOP leadership in an effort to craft something that could easily clear Congress. 
 
The Senate could "pass something that comes through — and hopefully we get a vote on it — but that comes through so overwhelmingly that it will also go to the House and they will do the same," Corker said.