Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisOcasio-Cortez's first House floor speech becomes C-SPAN's most-viewed Twitter video Kamala Harris says her New Year's resolution is to 'cook more' Harris to oppose Trump's attorney general nominee MORE (D-Calif.) will remain on the Judiciary Committee next year as Democratic leadership negotiates with Republicans over who will sit on Senate panels starting in January.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDem senators debate whether to retweet Cardi B video criticizing Trump over shutdown William Barr's only 'flaw' is that he was nominated by Trump Cardi B expresses solidarity with federal workers not getting paid MORE (D-N.Y.) announced on Tuesday that Democrats had successfully secured Harris's seat on the panel, which has given her a high-profile perch ahead of a potential 2020 White House bid.

"As a former prosecutor, [Harris] has strived every day for a more fair judicial system for all Americans. I’m proud that we successfully fought to keep her seat on the Senate Judiciary Committee," Schumer said in a tweet

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A source familiar with negotiations said Schumer made keeping Harris on the panel a "top priority" and that none of the 10 Democrats who currently sit on the panel will lose their seat. Republicans currently have 11 seats on the committee.

"The Judiciary Committee will be expanding. The Republicans will add a new seat," the source added. 

Schumer and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate Republicans eye rules change to speed Trump nominees McConnell blocks bill to reopen most of government Overnight Health Care: Thousands more migrant children may have been separated | Senate rejects bill to permanently ban federal funds for abortion | Women's March to lobby for 'Medicare for All' MORE (R-Ky.) are negotiating the break down of each of the committees for the next Congress, where Republicans will expand their majority from 51 to 53 seats. 

Because Harris is the least senior Democratic member on the high-profile panel and Republicans gained seats in the November midterm elections, she was at risk of losing her seat.

Harris told Schumer after the midterms that she wanted to remain on the panel, and Schumer publicly pledged to try to keep her on it. 

Harris joined the Judiciary Committee in January after Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenGillibrand announces exploratory committee to run for president on Colbert The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Trump AG pick Barr grilled at hearing | Judge rules against census citizenship question | McConnell blocks second House bill to reopen government Overnight Health Care: House Dems launch major drug pricing investigation | Judge blocks Trump contraception rule rollback | Booker tries to shake doubts about pharmaceutical ties ahead of 2020 | FDA to resume high-risk food inspections MORE (D-Minn.) resigned and Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) was sworn in, giving Democrats an additional seat in the Senate.

Her position on the panel has given her a front-row seat to some of the biggest Trump administration fights, including the battle over Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughGOP pollster says last minute enthusiasm saved Republicans in some midterm races Ocasio-Cortez's first House floor speech becomes C-SPAN's most-viewed Twitter video Kamala Harris says her New Year's resolution is to 'cook more' MORE and Trump's circuit and district court picks. The panel will also be responsible for vetting William Barr, Trump's attorney general nominee, next year.

Harris is one of two African-American senators on the panel and one of four female members, each of whom are Democrats.