Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisO'Rourke faces pressure from left on 'Medicare for all' O'Rourke says he won't use 'f-word' on campaign trail O'Rourke not planning, but not ruling out big fundraisers MORE (D-Calif.) will remain on the Judiciary Committee next year as Democratic leadership negotiates with Republicans over who will sit on Senate panels starting in January.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerWhy we need to build gateway now Campaign to draft Democratic challenger to McConnell starts raising funds Schumer congratulates J. Lo and A-Rod, but says 'I'm never officiating a wedding again' MORE (D-N.Y.) announced on Tuesday that Democrats had successfully secured Harris's seat on the panel, which has given her a high-profile perch ahead of a potential 2020 White House bid.

"As a former prosecutor, [Harris] has strived every day for a more fair judicial system for all Americans. I’m proud that we successfully fought to keep her seat on the Senate Judiciary Committee," Schumer said in a tweet

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A source familiar with negotiations said Schumer made keeping Harris on the panel a "top priority" and that none of the 10 Democrats who currently sit on the panel will lose their seat. Republicans currently have 11 seats on the committee.

"The Judiciary Committee will be expanding. The Republicans will add a new seat," the source added. 

Schumer and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellRepublicans up for reelection fear daylight with Trump Overnight Energy: Students around globe demand climate action | EPA bans consumer sales of deadly chemical in paint strippers | Green New Deal set for Senate vote The Hill's Morning Report — Trump readies first veto after latest clash with Senate GOP MORE (R-Ky.) are negotiating the break down of each of the committees for the next Congress, where Republicans will expand their majority from 51 to 53 seats. 

Because Harris is the least senior Democratic member on the high-profile panel and Republicans gained seats in the November midterm elections, she was at risk of losing her seat.

Harris told Schumer after the midterms that she wanted to remain on the panel, and Schumer publicly pledged to try to keep her on it. 

Harris joined the Judiciary Committee in January after Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenKirsten Gillibrand officially announces White House run Gillibrand says staffer allegations did not 'rise to the level of sexual harassment' Female Gillibrand aide resigned over handling of her sexual harassment complaint: report MORE (D-Minn.) resigned and Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) was sworn in, giving Democrats an additional seat in the Senate.

Her position on the panel has given her a front-row seat to some of the biggest Trump administration fights, including the battle over Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughGeorgia's heartbeat abortion bill is dangerous for women nationwide Senate votes to confirm Neomi Rao to appeals court Battle over Trump's judicial nominees enters new phase MORE and Trump's circuit and district court picks. The panel will also be responsible for vetting William Barr, Trump's attorney general nominee, next year.

Harris is one of two African-American senators on the panel and one of four female members, each of whom are Democrats.