Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe 'pitcher of warm spit' — Veepstakes and the fate of Mike Pence Crump, attorney for George Floyd's family, endorses Harris for Biden VP pick Davis: My recommendation for vice president on Biden ticket MORE (D-Calif.) will remain on the Judiciary Committee next year as Democratic leadership negotiates with Republicans over who will sit on Senate panels starting in January.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerMeadows: 'I'm not optimistic there will be a solution in the very near term' on coronavirus package Biden calls on Trump, Congress to enact an emergency housing program Senators press Postal Service over complaints of slow delivery MORE (D-N.Y.) announced on Tuesday that Democrats had successfully secured Harris's seat on the panel, which has given her a high-profile perch ahead of a potential 2020 White House bid.

"As a former prosecutor, [Harris] has strived every day for a more fair judicial system for all Americans. I’m proud that we successfully fought to keep her seat on the Senate Judiciary Committee," Schumer said in a tweet

ADVERTISEMENT

A source familiar with negotiations said Schumer made keeping Harris on the panel a "top priority" and that none of the 10 Democrats who currently sit on the panel will lose their seat. Republicans currently have 11 seats on the committee.

"The Judiciary Committee will be expanding. The Republicans will add a new seat," the source added. 

Schumer and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP scrambles to fend off Kobach in Kansas primary Meadows: Election will be held on November third Don't let Trump distract us from the real threat of his presidency MORE (R-Ky.) are negotiating the break down of each of the committees for the next Congress, where Republicans will expand their majority from 51 to 53 seats. 

Because Harris is the least senior Democratic member on the high-profile panel and Republicans gained seats in the November midterm elections, she was at risk of losing her seat.

Harris told Schumer after the midterms that she wanted to remain on the panel, and Schumer publicly pledged to try to keep her on it. 

Harris joined the Judiciary Committee in January after Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenCNN publishes first Al Franken op-ed since resignation Political world mourns loss of comedian Jerry Stiller Maher to Tara Reade on timing of sexual assault allegation: 'Why wait until Biden is our only hope?' MORE (D-Minn.) resigned and Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) was sworn in, giving Democrats an additional seat in the Senate.

Her position on the panel has given her a front-row seat to some of the biggest Trump administration fights, including the battle over Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughDavis: My recommendation for vice president on Biden ticket Kavanaugh urged Supreme Court to avoid decisions on Trump finances, abortion: report Buy the dip: Bet on Trump MORE and Trump's circuit and district court picks. The panel will also be responsible for vetting William Barr, Trump's attorney general nominee, next year.

Harris is one of two African-American senators on the panel and one of four female members, each of whom are Democrats.