Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHarris slams DOJ decision not to charge police in Eric Garner's death Harris vows to 'put people over profit' in prescription drug plan The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet MORE (D-Calif.) will remain on the Judiciary Committee next year as Democratic leadership negotiates with Republicans over who will sit on Senate panels starting in January.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerNYT: Don't make Acosta a political martyr Charities say they never received donations touted by Jeffrey Epstein: report Schumer to donate Epstein campaign contributions to groups fighting sexual violence MORE (D-N.Y.) announced on Tuesday that Democrats had successfully secured Harris's seat on the panel, which has given her a high-profile perch ahead of a potential 2020 White House bid.

"As a former prosecutor, [Harris] has strived every day for a more fair judicial system for all Americans. I’m proud that we successfully fought to keep her seat on the Senate Judiciary Committee," Schumer said in a tweet

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A source familiar with negotiations said Schumer made keeping Harris on the panel a "top priority" and that none of the 10 Democrats who currently sit on the panel will lose their seat. Republicans currently have 11 seats on the committee.

"The Judiciary Committee will be expanding. The Republicans will add a new seat," the source added. 

Schumer and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet GOP put on the back foot by Trump's race storm Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA —Biden unveils health care plan | Proposal pitches subsidies, public option | Biden vows if you like your health insurance, 'you can keep it' | Sanders protests planned Philadelphia hospital closure MORE (R-Ky.) are negotiating the break down of each of the committees for the next Congress, where Republicans will expand their majority from 51 to 53 seats. 

Because Harris is the least senior Democratic member on the high-profile panel and Republicans gained seats in the November midterm elections, she was at risk of losing her seat.

Harris told Schumer after the midterms that she wanted to remain on the panel, and Schumer publicly pledged to try to keep her on it. 

Harris joined the Judiciary Committee in January after Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenAl Franken: It's time to start taking Trump 'literally' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Mexican officials scramble to avoid Trump tariffs The Hill's Morning Report - Tariff battle looms as Trump jabs 'foolish' Senate GOP MORE (D-Minn.) resigned and Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) was sworn in, giving Democrats an additional seat in the Senate.

Her position on the panel has given her a front-row seat to some of the biggest Trump administration fights, including the battle over Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet Susan Collins raises M in second quarter fundraising, surpassing 2014 reelection bid The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic infighting threatens 2020 unity MORE and Trump's circuit and district court picks. The panel will also be responsible for vetting William Barr, Trump's attorney general nominee, next year.

Harris is one of two African-American senators on the panel and one of four female members, each of whom are Democrats.