A bipartisan group of senators is preparing to revive legislation to protect special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE from being fired. 

Sens. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsSenate Dem calls on Trump to apologize for attacks on McCain Sixteen years later, let's finally heed the call of the 9/11 Commission  Senate Dems introduce bill demanding report on Khashoggi killing MORE (D-Del.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisOvernight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts' Trump keeps tight grip on GOP MORE (R-N.C.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBooker gains first endorsement from state lawmaker in South Carolina CNN town halls put network at center of Dem primary Amy Poehler reveals which Dem candidates her 'Parks and Recreation' character might vote for MORE (D-N.J.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Memo: Trump can't let go of McCain grudge The Hill's Morning Report - Trump's intraparty feuds divide Republicans Trump's attacks on McCain exacerbate tensions with Senate GOP MORE (R-S.C.) will reintroduce the legislation this week, spokespeople for Coons confirmed. 
 
The legislation protects Mueller, or any other special counsel, in the event he is fired by providing for an "expedited review" of the firing. If a court determines that it wasn't for "good cause," the special counsel would be reinstated.
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It would also codify Justice Department regulations that say only a senior department official could fire Mueller or another special counsel.
 
Republican backers of the legislation have said they don't believe President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate GOP budget ignores Trump, cuts defense Trump says he'll nominate Stephen Moore to Fed White House: ISIS territory in Syria has been 100 percent eliminated MORE will fire Mueller, whom he has accused of leading a "witch hunt" against him, but that the legislation is good policy regardless of who is in the White House. 

Tillis said in a statement to The Associated Press, which first reported plans to reintroduce the bill this week, that he believes it "is true" that Trump won't fire Mueller. 

"However, I also believe this bipartisan legislation is good government policy with enduring value across the current and future administrations," Tillis said. 

House Democrats introduced similar legislation last week on the first day the party took back control of that chamber, arguing the bill was key to making sure Mueller's probe into the 2016 election continues unimpeded. Both acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker and William Barr, Trump's pick to be attorney general, have been critical of the investigation.
 
Though Graham is taking over as Judiciary Committee chairman, the bill is unlikely to clear the Senate. GOP leadership is opposed to the bill and other Republican senators believe it is unconstitutional. 
 
Retired Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump's attacks on McCain exacerbate tensions with Senate GOP Schumer to introduce bill naming Senate office building after McCain amid Trump uproar Trump keeps tight grip on GOP MORE (R-Ariz.), Booker and Coons tried three times over roughly a month late last year to get a vote on the bill, but they were blocked each time. 
 
Under the upper chamber's rules, senators can go to the floor to request a vote or passage of any bill or nomination. But any senator can block their requests.