A bipartisan group of senators is preparing to revive legislation to protect special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE from being fired. 

Sens. Christopher CoonsChris Andrew CoonsModerates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats Schumer lays groundwork for future filibuster reform Pavlich: Biden wants 'infrastructure' ­– Republicans should negotiate MORE (D-Del.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisBipartisan Senate proposal would grant million to minority businesses Biden's gun control push poses danger for midterms The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings MORE (R-N.C.), Cory BookerCory BookerProgressive lawmakers press DHS chief on immigration detention Democrats battle over best path for Puerto Rico Biden's DOJ civil rights nominee faces sharp GOP criticism MORE (D-N.J.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamWall Street spent .9B on campaigns, lobbying in 2020 election: study Biden aide: Ability to collect daily intel in Afghanistan 'will diminish' Leaving Afghanistan: Is it victory or defeat? MORE (R-S.C.) will reintroduce the legislation this week, spokespeople for Coons confirmed. 
 
The legislation protects Mueller, or any other special counsel, in the event he is fired by providing for an "expedited review" of the firing. If a court determines that it wasn't for "good cause," the special counsel would be reinstated.
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It would also codify Justice Department regulations that say only a senior department official could fire Mueller or another special counsel.
 

Tillis said in a statement to The Associated Press, which first reported plans to reintroduce the bill this week, that he believes it "is true" that Trump won't fire Mueller. 

"However, I also believe this bipartisan legislation is good government policy with enduring value across the current and future administrations," Tillis said. 

House Democrats introduced similar legislation last week on the first day the party took back control of that chamber, arguing the bill was key to making sure Mueller's probe into the 2016 election continues unimpeded. Both acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker and William Barr, Trump's pick to be attorney general, have been critical of the investigation.
 
Though Graham is taking over as Judiciary Committee chairman, the bill is unlikely to clear the Senate. GOP leadership is opposed to the bill and other Republican senators believe it is unconstitutional. 
 
Retired Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeFive reasons why US faces chronic crisis at border Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain Former GOP lawmaker: Republican Party 'engulfed in lies and fear' MORE (R-Ariz.), Booker and Coons tried three times over roughly a month late last year to get a vote on the bill, but they were blocked each time. 
 
Under the upper chamber's rules, senators can go to the floor to request a vote or passage of any bill or nomination. But any senator can block their requests.