A bipartisan group of senators is preparing to revive legislation to protect special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerBarr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting MORE from being fired. 

Sens. Christopher CoonsChris Andrew CoonsThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - GOP angst in Georgia; confirmation fight looms Overnight Health Care: Moderna to apply for emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine candidate | Hospitals brace for COVID-19 surge | US more than doubles highest number of monthly COVID-19 cases Bipartisan Senate group holding coronavirus relief talks amid stalemate MORE (D-Del.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisRep. Mark Walker announces Senate bid in North Carolina Grassley returns to Capitol after having coronavirus McConnell halts in-person Republican lunches amid COVID-19 surge MORE (R-N.C.), Cory BookerCory BookerBiden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate Policy center calls for new lawmakers to make diverse hires Dangerously fast slaughter speeds are putting animals, people at greater risk during COVID-19 crisis MORE (D-N.J.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamBarr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel Democracy is the MVP in 2020 The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - GOP angst in Georgia; confirmation fight looms MORE (R-S.C.) will reintroduce the legislation this week, spokespeople for Coons confirmed. 
 
The legislation protects Mueller, or any other special counsel, in the event he is fired by providing for an "expedited review" of the firing. If a court determines that it wasn't for "good cause," the special counsel would be reinstated.
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It would also codify Justice Department regulations that say only a senior department official could fire Mueller or another special counsel.
 
Republican backers of the legislation have said they don't believe President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump alludes to possible 2024 run in White House remarks Trump threatens to veto defense bill over tech liability shield Tiger King's attorney believes they're close to getting pardon from Trump MORE will fire Mueller, whom he has accused of leading a "witch hunt" against him, but that the legislation is good policy regardless of who is in the White House. 

Tillis said in a statement to The Associated Press, which first reported plans to reintroduce the bill this week, that he believes it "is true" that Trump won't fire Mueller. 

"However, I also believe this bipartisan legislation is good government policy with enduring value across the current and future administrations," Tillis said. 

House Democrats introduced similar legislation last week on the first day the party took back control of that chamber, arguing the bill was key to making sure Mueller's probe into the 2016 election continues unimpeded. Both acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker and William Barr, Trump's pick to be attorney general, have been critical of the investigation.
 
Though Graham is taking over as Judiciary Committee chairman, the bill is unlikely to clear the Senate. GOP leadership is opposed to the bill and other Republican senators believe it is unconstitutional. 
 
Retired Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeBiden eyeing Cindy McCain for UK ambassador position: report Profiles in cowardice: Trump's Senate enablers McSally concedes Arizona Senate race MORE (R-Ariz.), Booker and Coons tried three times over roughly a month late last year to get a vote on the bill, but they were blocked each time. 
 
Under the upper chamber's rules, senators can go to the floor to request a vote or passage of any bill or nomination. But any senator can block their requests.