The Senate voted to advance legislation blocking President TrumpDonald John TrumpLev Parnas implicates Rick Perry, says Giuliani had him pressure Ukraine to announce Biden probe Saudi Arabia paid 0 million for cost of US troops in area Parnas claims ex-Trump attorney visited him in jail, asked him to sacrifice himself for president MORE’s plan to lift sanctions against three Russian companies despite an eleventh-hour effort by the administration to kill the bill.

Senators voted 57-42 to begin debating the resolution, with only a simple majority needed to get over the initial hurdle.

Though only a procedural vote, it’s the latest foreign policy break between the Trump administration and Senate Republicans, who have been wary of his warmer rhetoric toward Moscow.

It comes amid reports that the president has discussed pulling the United States out of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). 

“I do disapprove of the easing of the sanctions because I think it sends the wrong message to Russia and to the oligarch and close ally of Mr. Putin, Oleg Deripaska, who will in my judgement continue to maintain considerable [ownership] under the Treasury’s plan,” Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsPoll shows Collins displaces McConnell as most unpopular senator Collins says she's 'likely' to support calling witnesses for impeachment trial Democratic group plans mobile billboard targeting Collins on impeachment MORE (R-Maine) told reporters.

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In addition to Collins, GOP Sens. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanAppropriators fume over reports of Trump plan to reprogram .2 billion for wall The job no GOP senator wants: 'I'd rather have a root canal' Eleven GOP senators sign open letter backing Sessions's comeback bid MORE (Ark.), Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonHillicon Valley: Lawmakers say Facebook deepfake ban falls short | House passes bills to win 5G race | Feds sound alarm on cyberthreat from Iran | Ivanka Trump appearance at tech show sparks backlash Cotton introduces bill blocking intel sharing with countries relying on Huawei for 5G GOP senators introduce resolution to change rules, dismiss impeachment without articles MORE (Ark.), Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesKoch network could target almost 200 races in 2020, official says GOP senators introduce resolution to change rules, dismiss impeachment without articles Congress to clash over Trump's war powers MORE (Mont.) Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerKoch network could target almost 200 races in 2020, official says Hickenlooper raised .8 million for Colorado Senate bid in fourth quarter of 2019 Lawmakers introduce bill to bolster artificial intelligence, quantum computing MORE (Colo.), Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyHouse poised to hand impeachment articles to Senate Pelosi set to send impeachment articles to the Senate next week McConnell backs measure to change Senate rules, dismiss impeachment without articles MORE (Mo.), John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.), Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyWolf Blitzer: GOP senator should apologize for calling CNN reporter 'liberal hack' Martha McSally fundraises off 'liberal hack' remark to CNN reporter GOP senator calls CNN reporter a 'liberal hack' when asked about Parnas materials MORE (Ariz.), Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranOvernight Defense: War powers fight runs into impeachment | Kaine has 51 votes for Iran resolution | Trump plans to divert .2B from Pentagon to border wall War powers fight in Senate runs squarely into impeachment Third GOP senator says he'll support Iran war powers resolution MORE (Kan.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioApple under pressure to unlock Pensacola shooter's phones Senators offer bill to create alternatives to Huawei in 5G tech Surging Sanders draws fresh scrutiny ahead of debate MORE (Fla.) and Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseOn The Money: Senate panel advances Trump's new NAFTA despite GOP gripes | Trade deficit falls to three-year low | Senate confirms Trump pick for small business chief Senate panel advances Trump's new NAFTA despite GOP gripes Congress to clash over Trump's war powers MORE (Neb.) voted to proceed to the resolution on Tuesday.

The same senators also helped block a separate effort from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPoll shows Collins displaces McConnell as most unpopular senator Hill.TV's Saagar Enjeti on impeachment: 'CNN can see through this nonsense' Trump says impeachment trial should move 'very quickly' MORE (R-Ky.) to pigeonhole the measure.

The setback for the administration comes after it announced plans late last month to relax sanctions on the three businesses — Rusal, EN+ and EuroSibEnerg — connected to Oleg Deripaska, an oligarch with ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Under the 2017 sanctions bill, Democrats are able to force a vote on a resolution to block the administration from lifting the financial penalties.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin led a lobbying effort to try to squelch concerns on Capitol Hill about the decision. He met with House Democrats last week and pitched Senate Republicans during a closed-door lunch Tuesday, hours before the vote.

Mnuchin declined to say if he believed the administration had the votes to prevent the Senate from passing the resolution of disapproval but argued it shouldn’t be a “political issue.”

But he added that the administration believed the sanctions against the three companies should be lifted because Deripaska’s ownership in the entities has fallen below 50 percent.

“We put together an agreement that we think meets the requirements of the laws and the regulations to do this,” Mnuchin said.

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Sen. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoDrug price outrage threatens to be liability for GOP It's time for the Senate to advance cannabis banking reform On The Money: Senate chairman opposes cannabis banking bill | Panel advances Trump pick for Small Business Administration | Judge tosses NY state fraud charges against Manafort MORE (R-Idaho) echoed Mnuchin in opposing the resolution to block the sanctions from being lifted.

“I will vote 'no' today because this was a hard-fought negotiation resulting in one of the strongest agreements ever, which supports long-standing U.S. sanctions policy and foreign policy toward Russia,” he said.

GOP leadership had been tight-lipped about whether they would be able to pull together the simple majority needed to sink the Democratic resolution, noting a swath of their members wanted to hear from Mnuchin.

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSenate to vote on Trump's Canada, Mexico trade deal Thursday Senate braces for Trump impeachment trial Republicans face internal brawl over impeachment witnesses MORE (R-S.D.) said “a lot of our members are anxious to ask questions” of the Trump administration before the vote.

“Whether we get on it, is still kind of an open question, I think,” Thune said.

McConnell separately knocked Democrats for forcing the Russia vote even as they are blocking a GOP foreign policy bill as part of their shutdown strategy.

"It was all just a farce. The Democratic leader doesn't actually mind doing other business because he now intends to bring a privileged and political stunt of a motion relating to the administration's use of sanctions against Russia,” McConnell said.

Democrats needed to win over at least four Republicans to advance the resolution, provided they could also unite their own caucus.

They could still face a 60-vote threshold filibuster of the measure before a final passage vote, which would require them to get 13 GOP senators.

Gardner, a member of the Foreign Relations Committee and a vulnerable 2020 incumbent, said on Tuesday that he would support the resolution.

"I anticipate voting to overturn the decision by the administration," Gardner told reporters.  

Rubio added that while he “appreciated” the Treasury Department’s effort, “for all intents and purposes between his shares, the independent shares that the Russian state owned bank control, and various other individual shareholders I still think he retains operational control … So they’re going to have to do better.”

Democrats announced over the weekend that they would force a vote to stop the Trump administration from being able to lift the sanctions.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSchumer votes against USMCA, citing climate implications Senators are politicians, not jurors — they should act like it GOP senator: 2020 candidates must recuse themselves from impeachment trial MORE (D-N.Y.), making a pitch to his colleagues before the vote, said opposing the resolution would be a “vote to go easy on President Putin and his oligarchs.”

“Putin’s Russia continues to run rampant over international norms,” Schumer added. “Show me the behavior from Vladimir Putin that warrants such relief? I can’t think of any. I’ll put 90 percent of all Americans can’t think of any.”

Both chambers would need to pass a resolution of disapproval by Thursday in order to block the administration from lifting sanctions. House Democrats have asked for an extension from the Treasury Department, but Mnuchin declined to discuss the issue on Tuesday.

House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerHouse poised to hand impeachment articles to Senate House to vote on Iran war powers bills sought by progressives Khanna: Timing of Iran bill being weighed against getting bigger majority MORE (D-Md.) said Tuesday he is introducing a resolution to prevent the Trump administration from lifting the sanctions. 

“Today, I am introducing a resolution to prevent the Treasury Department from lifting sanctions on businesses controlled by Oleg Deripaska, a Russian oligarch who has been sanctioned for his close relationship to President Putin and activities aimed at harming the interests of the United States,” Hoyer said in a statement.

He added that “Deripaska has been key to much of the malign activities Russia directs against the United States, and the Congress must protect the American people against foreign interference and corruption.”