Senate approves Syria, anti-BDS bill
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The Senate passed legislation on Thursday breaking with President TrumpDonald John TrumpWayfair refutes QAnon-like conspiracy theory that it's trafficking children Stone rails against US justice system in first TV interview since Trump commuted his sentence Federal appeals court rules Trump admin can't withhold federal grants from California sanctuary cities MORE’s Syria policy. 

Senators voted 77-23 to send the legislation to the House that includes a provision warning Trump against a “precipitous” withdrawal of troops from Syria and Afghanistan.

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It also asks the administration to certify that certain conditions have been met "for the enduring defeat of al Qaeda and ISIS before initiating any significant withdrawal of United States forces from Syria or Afghanistan."

The bill was approved after it overcame a filibuster earlier this week. 

 

“I keep reading where the national media writes that the United States Senate rebuked — they used the word 'rebuked' — President Trump. Nothing could be further from the truth,” Risch, the chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, said. 

In addition to the Syria amendment, the bill also included sanctions against the Syrian government, increased support for Israel and Jordan and a provision that would let states penalize businesses that take part in boycotts or divestments of Israel. 

Both the Syria amendment and the anti-BDS provisions sparked division among Democrats. 

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyConnecticut senators call for Subway to ban open carry of firearms Democrats optimistic about chances of winning Senate Gridlock mires chances of police reform deal MORE (D-Conn.) warned that the Syria proposal, offered by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell in talks with Mnuchin on next phase of coronavirus relief Pelosi: 'We shouldn't even be thinking' about reopening schools without federal aid The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Argentum - All eyes on Florida as daily COVID-19 cases hit 15K MORE (R-Ky.), is “the absolute wrong way to address President Trump’s backwards foreign policy in the Middle East.”

In response to concerns from Democrats, the Senate easily cleared a tweak to McConnell's amendment that would clarify that the resolution should not be "constructed as a declaration of war or an authorization of the use of military force."

Trump's decision to withdraw troops from Syria, which precipitated the resignation of former Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisTrump flails as audience dwindles and ratings plummet Budowsky: Biden-Duckworth would be America's team Trump insulted UK's May, called Germany's Merkel 'stupid' in calls: report MORE, sparked fierce backlash on Capitol Hill. 

Two officials told The New York Times last year that the administration had ordered the U.S. military to start withdrawing troops in Afghanistan, but Trump, who has long railed against the war there, has not made an official announcement.

The Washington Post reported last week that the United States and the Taliban were moving closer to a deal that could result in the removal of U.S. troops from the country.

Meanwhile, Democrats had raised First Amendment concerns about the anti-BDS provision, which splintered most of the party’s 2020 contenders and caucus leadership. 

“While I do not support the BDS movement, we must defend every American’s constitutional right to engage in political activity. It is clear to me that this bill would violate Americans’ First Amendment rights,” Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOVERNIGHT ENERGY: EPA declines to tighten smog standards amid pressure from green groups | Democrats split on Trump plan to use development funds for nuclear projects| Russian mining giant reports another fuel spill in Arctic Biden lets Trump be Trump Democrats split on Trump plan to use development funds for nuclear projects MORE (I-Vt.) said in a statement last week.