Murkowski 'likely' to support resolution to block Trump's emergency declaration
© Stefani Reynolds

GOP Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOvernight Defense: Highlights from Defense pick's confirmation hearing | Esper spars with Warren over ethics | Sidesteps questions on Mattis vs. Trump | Trump says he won't sell F-35s to Turkey Epstein charges show Congress must act to protect children from abuse PBS premieres first nationally distributed kids' show with Native American lead MORE (Alaska) said over the weekend that she is "likely" to support a resolution blocking President TrumpDonald John TrumpPompeo changes staff for Russia meeting after concerns raised about top negotiator's ties: report House unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Ben Carson: Trump is not a racist and his comments were not racist MORE's emergency declaration, which is expected to be sent to the Senate later this week. 

"I want to make sure that the resolution of disapproval is exactly what I think it is, because if it is as I understand it to be, I will likely be supporting the resolution to disapprove of the action," Murkowski said in an audio recording provided to The Associated Press by an aide. 

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Murkowski added in a separate interview with KTUU, an Alaska TV station, that she would "probably" vote for the resolution of disapproval. 

"When I say probably, I want to make sure that what in fact we are voting on when it comes to the Senate is what I believe it is. If it's what I have seen right now, I will support the resolution to disapprove," Murkowski said. 

She said that she was likely supporting the resolution not because she disagrees with Trump on border security but stressed that there needed to be "clear lines" on "the separation of powers, the institution of the Congress as that appropriating branch." 

"You're going to see a lot of drama in the next couple of weeks," Murkowski said. 

Trump announced earlier this month that he would declare a national emergency to construct the U.S.-Mexico border wall after Congress gave him $1.3 billion for barriers — considerably less than the $5.7 billion he had requested. 

His decision sparked bipartisan backlash on Capitol Hill. House Democrats filed a resolution to block the emergency declaration on Friday. House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiHouse unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Will Trump's racist tweets backfire? Al Green: 'We have the opportunity to punish' Trump with impeachment vote MORE (D-Calif.) told reporters that it would be on the floor for a vote on Tuesday, where it's expected to pass. 

Senate Democrats are expected to "soon" introduce a similar resolution, according to a statement released by Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerLawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens Trump administration denies temporary immigrant status to Venezuelans in US Colombian official urges more help for Venezuelan migrants MORE (D-N.Y.) late last week. 

If all 47 Democrats vote for the resolution to block Trump's declaration, they will still need to flip four Republicans in order to send the measure to the president's desk, where he's said he will veto it. 

Several Republicans have voiced concerns about the emergency declaration. Trump, in a tweet on Monday morning, urged Republican senators to be "strong and smart" when a vote comes before the Senate. 

"I hope our great Republican Senators don’t get led down the path of weak and ineffective Border Security. Without strong Borders, we don’t have a Country - and the voters are on board with us. Be strong and smart, don’t fall into the Democrats 'trap' of Open Borders and Crime!" he wrote in the tweet. 

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTrump angry more Republicans haven't defended his tweets: report Republicans scramble to contain Trump fallout The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump digs in ahead of House vote to condemn tweet MORE (Maine) was the first Republican senator to say that she will vote for the resolution of disapproval and voiced concerned that Trump's decision could negatively impact projects in her home state. 

"I believe it will pass the House, and, I don't know what the vote situation will be in the Senate, nor do I know exactly what that resolution will say but it is a privileged matter. That means that it will come before the Senate for a vote, and if it's a clean disapproval resolution, I will support it," she told reporters in Maine last week.