Senate Republicans are moving to keep the Supreme Court at nine justices as a growing number of Democratic 2020 contenders have expressed an openness to expanding it. 
 
Roughly a dozen Republican senators introduced the resolution on Monday that would keep the Supreme Court at nine justices. 
 
 
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He added that he was introducing the constitutional amendment "to prevent the delegitimizing of the Supreme Court."
 
GOP Sens. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeySasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote Philly GOP commissioner on censures: 'I would suggest they censure Republican elected officials who are lying' Toomey censured by several Pennsylvania county GOP committees over impeachment vote MORE (Pa.), Kevin CramerKevin John CramerSenate braces for 'God-awful,' 'stupid' session ahead of COVID-19 relief vote Ron Johnson grinds Senate to halt, irritating many Senate votes to take up COVID-19 relief bill MORE (N.D.), Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnRepublicans blast Pentagon policy nominee over tweets, Iran nuclear deal White House defends Biden's 'Neanderthal thinking' remark on masks Marsha Blackburn: Biden needs to 'rethink' comments about 'resilient' and 'resourceful' Neanderthals MORE (Tenn.), Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungSenate rejects Cruz effort to block stimulus checks for undocumented immigrants Overnight Defense: White House open to reforming war powers | Army base might house migrant children | Fauci scolds military on vaccine White House open to reforming war powers amid bipartisan push MORE (Ind.), Cindy Hyde-Smith (Miss.), John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: House Democrats reintroduce road map to carbon neutrality by 2050 | Kerry presses oil companies to tackle climate change | Biden delays transfer of sacred lands for copper mine Biden reignites immigration fight in Congress McConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time MORE (N.D.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeWhite House downplays surprising February jobs gain, warns US far from recovery White House open to reforming war powers amid bipartisan push Garland's AG nomination delayed by GOP roadblocks MORE (Utah), Ben SasseBen SasseIs nonpartisan effectiveness still possible? Senators introduce bill creating technology partnerships to compete with China Garland's AG nomination delayed by GOP roadblocks MORE (Neb.), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGraham: Trump can make GOP bigger, stronger, or he 'could destroy it' Democratic centrists flex power on Biden legislation Ron Johnson grinds Senate to halt, irritating many MORE (Utah), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoTrump announces new tranche of endorsements Biden convenes bipartisan meeting on cancer research Senate panel unanimously advances top Biden economic nominees MORE (Idaho), and Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoDemocratic centrists flex power on Biden legislation Biden to meet with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure Passage of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act is the first step to heal our democracy MORE (W.Va) are cosponsoring the resolution. 
 
The Senate resolution would specify that the Supreme Court "shall be composed of not more than 9 justices." A similar resolution was introduced in the House late last week. 
 
Enacting a constitutional amendment would be an uphill battle, if not an impossible goal. The amendment would first need to win over two-thirds of both chambers of Congress, and then be ratified by three-fourths of the states.
 
But Rubio first announced last week that he would introduce the amendment after several Democratic White House contenders, including a handful that are Rubio's Senate colleagues, expressed an openness to expanding the Supreme Court or enacting other judicial reforms, including term limits. 
 
Both Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenSenate rejects Sanders minimum wage hike Philly city council calls on Biden to 'cancel all student loan debt' in first 100 days Hillicon Valley: High alert as new QAnon date approaches Thursday | Biden signals another reversal from Trump with national security guidance | Parler files a new case MORE (D-Mass.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisWhite House says Biden would prefer to not end filibuster Biden takes victory lap after Senate passes coronavirus relief package It will be Vice (or) President Harris against Gov. DeSantis in 2024 — bet on it MORE (D-Calif.) have said expanding, or "packing," the court should be an option on the table as part of a larger conversation among Democrats about the direction of the U.S. judicial system.

 
Supporters argue that President TrumpDonald TrumpUS, South Korea reach agreement on cost-sharing for troops Graham: Trump can make GOP bigger, stronger, or he 'could destroy it' Biden nominates female generals whose promotions were reportedly delayed under Trump MORE and congressional Republicans have been able to pack the courts with conservative judges, including two Supreme Court justices and dozens of appeals court nominees.

But Rubio countered in a Fox News op-ed last week that trying to expand the courts had become a "litmus test" for White House hopefuls and stemmed from an "ugly, winner-take-all rhetoric" among progressives.