Senate confirms Trump's 100th judicial nominee
© Greg Nash

Senate Republicans this week confirmed President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump conversation with foreign leader part of complaint that led to standoff between intel chief, Congress: report Pelosi: Lewandowski should have been held in contempt 'right then and there' Trump to withdraw FEMA chief nominee: report MORE's 100th judicial nominee.

The milestone marks the latest victory for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLawmakers run into major speed bumps on spending bills Budowsky: Donald, Boris, Bibi — The right in retreat Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to meet with lawmakers | Big tech defends efforts against online extremism | Trump attends secretive Silicon Valley fundraiser | Omar urges Twitter to take action against Trump tweet MORE (R-Ky.), who views the courts as the party's best shot at having a long-term impact on the direction of the country and who has made confirming Trump's picks a top priority. 

"After studying and considering these nominees the Senate will keep on filing judicial vacancies. We'll keep confirming the president's team," McConnell said taking a victory lap ahead of the Senate's action.

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The Senate on Thursday confirmed Rodolfo Armando Ruiz II to be a judge for the Southern District of Florida, marking Trump's 100th judicial pick.

Lawmakers quickly followed with back-to-back votes on Raúl Arias-Marxuach to be judge for the district of Puerto Rico and Joshua Wolson to be a judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania — giving Trump his 101st and 102nd judicial confirmations.

GOP senators celebrated the milestone on Twitter. Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGOP signals unease with Barr's gun plan NRA says Trump administration memo a 'non-starter' Barr fails to persuade Cruz on expanded background checks MORE (R-Iowa), the previous chairman and a current member of the Judiciary Committee, said Trump's nominees will read the Constitution "as written instead of what suits their political goals."

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP signals unease with Barr's gun plan Overnight Defense: Trump says he has 'many options' on Iran | Hostage negotiator chosen for national security adviser | Senate Dems block funding bill | Documents show Pentagon spent at least 4K at Trump's Scotland resort GOP's Kennedy sends warning shot to Trump nominee Menashi MORE (R-S.C.), the current chairman, added that it was a "great milestone for the Trump administration."

The slate of nomination votes comes after Republicans deployed the "nuclear option" last month to drastically reduce the amount of time it takes to confirm most of the president's nominees.

Under the rules change, district court nominations and most executive nominees only require two hours of debate after defeating a filibuster and showing they have the votes to be confirmed. They previously required 30 hours of debate.

In addition to district judges, Trump's more than 100 confirmations include two Supreme Court picks, Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughPelosi: Lewandowski should have been held in contempt 'right then and there' Kavanaugh book authors dismayed about Democrats 'rush to judgment' on impeachment calls Clinton celebrates first visibly pregnant CEO to be on business magazine cover MORE, as well as 37 circuit court judges.

Republicans have set records for their pace of confirming Trump's nominees to the influential appeals courts. McConnell has teed up two more circuit picks for next week: Joseph Bianco and Michael Park to be judges on the 2nd Circuit.

Democrats have fumed over conservatives' rush to confirm Trump's picks, accusing them of bending the rules in order to get nominees on the courts.

In addition to going "nuclear" to reduce debate time, Republicans used the nuclear option in 2017 to nix the 60-vote filibuster for Supreme Court nominations after Democrats got rid of a similar hurdle for executive and lower court nominees in 2013.

Democrats have also protested Republicans moving nominations over the objections of home-state senators. Neither Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSchumer, Pelosi push Trump to back universal background check bill Sinema says she would back Kennedy in race against Markey Democrats threaten to withhold defense votes over wall MORE (D-N.Y.) nor Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDefense bill talks set to start amid wall fight Democrats seize Senate floor to protest gun inaction: 'Put up or shut up' At debate, Warren and Buttigieg tap idealism of Obama, FDR MORE (D-N.Y.) returned a blue slip on the two circuit picks up for a vote next week.

Demand Justice, a progressive outside group, accused Trump and McConnell of "packing the courts" and noted that by this point in his administration, former President Obama had gotten 81 judicial confirmations.

"Trump and Mitch McConnell are packing our courts with extreme judges at a disturbing and unprecedented rate with little standing in their way," the group said.