Senate passes bill to deny entry for individuals who meddle in US elections
© Keren Carrion
The Senate cleared legislation on Monday night to block individuals who meddle in U.S. elections from being able to enter the United States.
 
The legislation, known as the Defending Elections against Trolls from Enemy Regimes Act (DETER Act), easily passed the Senate by unanimous consent — a move that any one senator could have blocked.
 
 
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According to the legislation, that would include violating voting or campaign finance laws or trying to interfere in elections or a campaign while under the direction of a foreign government. 
 
"As we saw in the 2016 elections, Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinThe Hill's Morning Report - Dems to lay out impeachment case to senators next week Overnight Defense: Foreign policy takes center stage at Democratic debate | House delivers impeachment articles to Senate | Dems vow to force new vote on Trump's border wall Putin names successor to Medvedev as Russian prime minister MORE’s Russia is attempting to strike at the very heart of the democratic values, freedoms, and liberty all Americans hold dear. By barring foreigners who improperly interfere in our elections from coming to the United States, the DETER Act sends a message to hostile nations across the world that the United States will not tolerate foreign interference in our elections," Graham said in a statement after the committee's vote.
 
The bill's Senate passage comes as election security is showing new, early signs of life in the chamber, even as top Republicans have expressed little public interest in moving broader election infrastructure legislation.
 
 
"I have some positive news. I have spoken to the Republican leader about that request. He has assured me we will have a briefing," Schumer said.
 
Senators have mounted a bipartisan push in the wake of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE's report to try to move election security through the Senate, arguing that it's needed in the wake of Russia's meddling in the 2016 election. 
 
 
"Unfortunately, Congress has done little to prevent future efforts by Russia or others to influence and disrupt the 2020 elections,” Durbin said.
 
Mueller warned about election interference during a press conference last week, which marked his first public comments since he wrapped up his two-year investigation earlier this year. 
 
"I will close by reiterating the central allegation of our indictments — that there were multiple, systematic efforts to interfere in our election. That allegation deserves the attention of every American," Mueller told reporters.