Senate Republicans blocked legislation on Thursday that would force campaigns to notify the Federal Election Commission and the FBI about attempts by foreign nationals to influence an election. 

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerFacebook users in lawsuit say company failed to warn them of known risks before 2018 breach New intel chief inherits host of challenges Overnight Defense: US, Russia tensions grow over nuclear arms | Highlights from Esper's Asia trip | Trump strikes neutral tone on Hong Kong protests | General orders ethics review of special forces MORE (D-Va.), the vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, tried to pass the Foreign Influence Reporting in Elections (FIRE) Act by unanimous consent. 

"This legislation is pretty simple, even for this body, it would require any presidential campaign that receives offers of assistance from an agent of a foreign government, has an obligation to report that offer of assistance to law enforcement, specifically the FBI," Warner said from the Senate floor.

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Under Warner's bill, campaign officials would have to report contacts with foreign nationals who are trying to make campaign donations or coordinate with the campaign to the Federal Election Commission, which would in turn notify the FBI.

Senate rules allow any one senator to ask for unanimous consent to pass a bill or approve a nomination. But any one senator can object and block the request.

Sen. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnTaylor Swift defends staying out of the 2016 election: 'I just knew I wasn't going to help' The 23 Republicans who opposed Trump-backed budget deal Senate passes sweeping budget deal, sending it to Trump MORE (R-Tenn.) objected to Warner's request, saying the reporting requirements within the legislation go "overboard." 

"The UC that was presented is overboard, and this is something that should be done in a thoughtful way. It should be done in a bipartisan way," Blackburn said.

Warner countered that Blackburn's reading of his legislation was "not accurate."

"The only thing that would have to be reported is if an agent of a foreign government or a foreign national offered something that was already prohibited," he added.

The back-and-forth on the Senate floor came after President TrumpDonald John TrumpFacebook releases audit on conservative bias claims Harry Reid: 'Decriminalizing border crossings is not something that should be at the top of the list' Recessions happen when presidents overlook key problems MORE set off alarm bells when he told ABC News that he was open to looking at information about a political opponent even if it was offered by a foreign government.

“I think you might want to listen. There’s nothing wrong with listening,” he told ABC. “It’s not an interference. They have information. I think I’d take it. If I thought there was something wrong, I’d go, maybe, to the FBI.”

Senate Republicans have rushed to distance themselves from Trump's comments, while Democrats have pointed to Trump's interview with ABC News as an example of why Congress needs to pass additional election security legislation. 

"This White House and this president doesn't seem to appreciate the seriousness of the threat," Warner said from the Senate floor.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerJohnson eyes Irish border in Brexit negotiations Lewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' Appropriators warn White House against clawing back foreign aid MORE (D-N.Y.) said senators would try again to pass the legislation. 

"When a president feels it's more important to win an election than conduct a fair election, we're a step further away from democracy and toward autocracy. That's what dictators believe, winning at all cost," he added.