The Senate set a new record for the longest vote in modern history Friday as the chamber votes on restricting President TrumpDonald John TrumpComey responds to Trump with Mariah Carey gif: 'Why are you so obsessed with me?' Congress to get election security briefing next month amid Intel drama New York man accused of making death threats against Schumer, Schiff MORE's ability to take military action against Iran without congressional approval. 
 
The Senate is normally out of town on Friday, but stuck around to give 2020 Democratic candidates a chance to vote on the amendment, from Sens. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineThe Hill's Morning Report — AG Barr, GOP senators try to rein Trump in Overnight Defense: Senate votes to rein in Trump war powers on Iran | Pentagon shifting .8B to border wall | US, Taliban negotiate seven-day 'reduction in violence' Democratic senators ask FDA to ban device used to shock disabled students MORE (D-Va.) and Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallButtigieg expands on climate plan with new proposals Climate change a rising concern for Western voters, poll finds Greenpeace says many plastics are not actually recyclable MORE (D-N.M.), that would block Trump from using funding to take military action against Iran without congressional approval. 
 
The vote clocked in at 10 hours when it wrapped up just after 3 p.m.
 
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In an effort to balance the 2020 demands and senators who had already planned trips, the Senate came into session at 5 a.m., several hours earlier than a normal week day. 
 
Several senators voted within minutes of the vote opening, including Sens. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinOvernight Energy: EPA to regulate 'forever chemicals' in drinking water | Trump budget calls for slashing funds for climate science centers | House Dems urge banks not to fund drilling in Arctic refuge Democratic senators criticize plan that could expand Arctic oil and gas development Democratic senators ask DOJ watchdog to expand Giuliani probe MORE (D-Ill.), Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyTrump seeks to boost vulnerable GOP senator with Colorado rally Democratic Senate campaign arm raised more than .5 million in January On the Trail: Senate GOP hopefuls tie themselves to Trump MORE (R-Ariz.), Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanSwing votes steal spotlight in marathon Trump impeachment Q&A Live coverage: Senators enter second day of questions in impeachment trial The Hill's Campaign Report: Ten days to Iowa MORE (R-Alaska) and Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterDemocratic senator: 'The ultimate of ironies' for Trump to hit Romney for invoking his faith Committee on Veterans Affairs sends important message during tense Senate time Democrats cry foul over Schiff backlash MORE (D-Mont.). 
 
 
Sens. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayOvernight Health Care: Senate panel to hold hearing on US coronavirus response | Dems demand Trump withdraw religious provider rule | Trump Medicaid proposal sparks bipartisan backlash Democratic senators urge Trump administration to request emergency funding for coronavirus response Democrats demand Trump administration withdraw religious provider rule MORE (D-Wash.) and Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenGraham: Trump has 'all the legal authority in the world' to pardon Stone Overnight Health Care: Senate panel to hold hearing on US coronavirus response | Dems demand Trump withdraw religious provider rule | Trump Medicaid proposal sparks bipartisan backlash Democrats demand Trump administration withdraw religious provider rule MORE (D-Ore.) were overheard talking about their flight times as they exited the Capitol. 
 
And Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.), spotting reporters as he entered the Capitol, quipped, "You've got to be kidding me? Six a.m., really?" 
 
The previous record for the longest vote in modern history was in December, when senators kept a vote open for more than five hours as they made a failed attempt to avoid a partial government shutdown. 
 
Friday's early voting, and long hours, wasn't without unusual moments. 
 
 
 
 
 
There was talk amongst senators that there wouldn't be enough Republican senators in Washington with the start of the Fourth of July recess for them to preside over the Senate for an hours-long last-minute session. 
 
Normally when the Senate is in session one Republican senator presides over the chamber, with the responsibility rotating amongst lawmakers throughout the day. 
 
Tester told reporters on Thursday that Democrats were being lined up to help preside over the chamber, adding, "I never saw it happen when we were in the majority."