Senate GOP raises concerns about White House stopgap plan to avoid shutdown
© Aaron Schwartz
Senate Republicans raised concerns about a White House offer to use a one-year stopgap funding bill to avoid a government shutdown starting in October if negotiators fail to reach a larger budget deal. 
 
Sen. Dave Perdue (R-Ga.) spearheaded a letter from 16 Republican senators Wednesday warning that a one-year continuing resolution (CR) would include "draconian conditions" for the military. 
 
"As the world continues to become more dangerous, the American people rightfully expect their representatives in Washington to put aside political differences and do their jobs. Simply put, our adversaries do not handcuff their militaries with funding gimmicks like continuing resolutions—nor should we," the senators wrote. 
 
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The letter was sent to Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinOn The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline Vulnerable Democrats tell Pelosi COVID-19 compromise 'essential' Pelosi asks panels to draft new COVID-19 relief measure MORE, acting chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyOn The Money: House panel pulls Powell into partisan battles | New York considers hiking taxes on the rich | Treasury: Trump's payroll tax deferral won't hurt Social Security Blockchain trade group names Mick Mulvaney to board Mick Mulvaney to start hedge fund MORE and acting Office of Management and Budget Director Russell Vought, who have led the budget talks for the White House.
 
Negotiators hope to reach a deal to raise the caps for defense and nondefense spending. But as a Plan B, Mnuchin has offered linking a debt ceiling increase to a one-year CR, which would freeze spending at fiscal 2019 levels. 
 
But Republican senators wrote in the letter that "must be avoided" because it would leave the Defense Department "incapable of increasing readiness, recapitalizing our force, or rationalizing funding to align with the National Defense Strategy." 
 
In addition to Perdue, Republican Sens. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnHillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns Key Democrat opposes GOP Section 230 subpoena for Facebook, Twitter, Google Senate panel threatens subpoena for Google, Facebook and Twitter executives MORE (Tenn.), Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyCoushatta tribe begins long road to recovery after Hurricane Laura Senators offer disaster tax relief bill Bottom line MORE (La.), John CornynJohn CornynQuinnipiac polls show Trump leading Biden in Texas, deadlocked race in Ohio The Hill's Campaign Report: GOP set to ask SCOTUS to limit mail-in voting Liberal super PAC launches ads targeting vulnerable GOP senators over SCOTUS fight MORE (Texas), Kevin CramerKevin John CramerAbortion stirs GOP tensions in Supreme Court fight Momentum growing among Republicans for Supreme Court vote before Election Day On Paycheck Protection Program, streamlined forgiveness is key MORE (N.D.), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoBottom line Davis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump Top GOP senator urges agencies to protect renters, banks amid coronavirus aid negotiations MORE (Idaho), Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstTillis appears to reinforce question about COVID-19 death toll The power of incumbency: How Trump is using the Oval Office to win reelection Poll: Trump opens up 6-point lead over Biden in Iowa MORE (Iowa), James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeChamber of Commerce endorses McSally for reelection Overnight Defense: Top admiral says 'no condition' where US should conduct nuclear test 'at this time' | Intelligence chief says Congress will get some in-person election security briefings Top admiral: 'No condition' where US should conduct nuclear test 'at this time' MORE (Okla.), Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonLobbying world Loeffler paints herself as 'more conservative than Attila the Hun' in new campaign ad Georgia GOP Senate candidates cite abortion in pushing Ginsburg replacement MORE (Ga.), James LankfordJames Paul LankfordMcConnell works to lock down GOP votes for coronavirus bill Charities scramble to plug revenue holes during pandemic Warren calls for Postal Service board members to fire DeJoy or resign MORE (Okla.), Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranLobbying world This World Suicide Prevention Day, let's recommit to protecting the lives of our veterans Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg acknowledges failure to take down Kenosha military group despite warnings | Election officials push back against concerns over mail-in voting, drop boxes MORE (Kan.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOVERNIGHT ENERGY:  House passes sweeping clean energy bill | Pebble Mine CEO resigns over secretly recorded comments about government officials  | Corporations roll out climate goals amid growing pressure to deliver The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump previews SCOTUS nominee as 'totally brilliant' Abortion stirs GOP tensions in Supreme Court fight MORE (Alaska), Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Washington on edge amid SCOTUS vacancy The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by National Industries for the Blind - Trump seeks to flip 'Rage' narrative; Dems block COVID-19 bill GOP senators say coronavirus deal dead until after election MORE (Kan.), Mike RoundsMarion (Mike) Michael RoundsDemocrats call for declassifying election threats after briefing by Trump officials The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - GOP closes ranks to fill SCOTUS vacancy by November Senate GOP sees early Supreme Court vote as political booster shot MORE (S.D.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisTillis appears to reinforce question about COVID-19 death toll Billionaire who donated to Trump in 2016 donates to Biden Collins: Winner of presidential election will be sworn in next year MORE (N.C.) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerHillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns Key Democrat opposes GOP Section 230 subpoena for Facebook, Twitter, Google Senate panel threatens subpoena for Google, Facebook and Twitter executives MORE (Miss) signed the letter. 
 
Inhofe is the chairman of the Armed Services Committee, the Senate panel with primary jurisdiction of the military. Ernst, Cornyn and Tillis, like Perdue, are each up for reelection next year in closely watched Senate races. 
 
The letter is the latest sign of division about what the party's back up plan should be as budget negotiations drag on. 
 
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump 'no longer angry' at Romney because of Supreme Court stance On The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump faces backlash after not committing to peaceful transition of power MORE (R-Ky.) told reporters before the July 4 recess that a one-year continuing resolution was "unacceptable," while Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSenate passes resolution reaffirming commitment to peaceful transition of power Susan Collins faces political land mine with Supreme Court fight Abortion stirs GOP tensions in Supreme Court fight MORE (S.D.), the No. 2 Republican senator, told The Hill that a CR was an outcome that he didn't think "anybody wants to see that happen."
 
Perdue told The Hill on Friday that he had discussed funding the government with Trump, who he characterized as "concerned about it as well." Perdue said that he plans to speak again to the president to outline his concerns about a one-year CR. 
 
Republicans blame a stalemate between Democrats and the White House for the holdup in getting a budget deal. 
 
Without an agreement, Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbySenate to push funding bill vote up against shutdown deadline Senate GOP eyes early exit Dems discussing government funding bill into February MORE (R-Ala.) wants to start moving funding bills that are based off a Senate-only agreement, though the legislation would need to be adjusted if they get a deal. 
 
But McConnell appeared to pour cold water on that option last week, saying he wants to write funding bills based off numbers he knows the president will support. 
 
“I support getting some kind of deal that can tell us how much we can spend so we can go forward. The only thing, however, that strikes me that give us a real number to mark to is one that we know the president will sign,” McConnell told reporters during a press conference.