Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerRepublicans fear backlash over Trump's threatened veto on Confederate names Overnight Defense: House panel votes to ban Confederate flag on all Pentagon property | DOD report says Russia working to speed US withdrawal from Afghanistan | 'Gang of Eight' to get briefing on bounties Thursday Top intelligence officials to brief Gang of Eight on Thursday MORE (D-N.Y.) blasted Republicans on Monday over the silence with which many have responded to President TrumpDonald John TrumpSecret Service members who helped organize Pence Arizona trip test positive for COVID-19: report Trump administration planning pandemic office at the State Department: report Iran releases photo of damaged nuclear fuel production site: report MORE's tweets telling four Democratic congresswomen of color to "go back" to their home countries. 
 
Schumer, speaking from the Senate floor, said Trump's comments "drip with racism" and questioned if Republicans weren't commenting "out of embarrassment or agreement." 
 
"Where are you when something this serious, this bigoted, this un-American happens? If you're saying to yourself, 'Well, he got us our big tax credit. Well, he's taking regulations off big corporations. ... We have to go along with this racism,' you are making a deal with the devil," Schumer said. 
 
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Schumer added that people who refuse to denounce Trump's comments are "fellow travelers on the president's racist road, whatever their motivation" and said their responses were "insufficient and un-American." 

Trump sparked fierce and widespread backlash — largely from Democrats — on Sunday when he targeted a group of unidentified progressive congresswomen "who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe."

In the tweets, which appeared to be directed at Democratic Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezHispanic Caucus asks Trump to rescind invitation to Mexican president Nadler wins Democratic primary The Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue MORE (N.Y.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarThe Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue Progressive lawmakers call for conditions on Israel aid Black lives and the CBC: What happens to a dream deferred? MORE (Minn.), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibThe Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue Progressive lawmakers call for conditions on Israel aid Ocasio-Cortez pitches interns to work for her instead of McConnell MORE (Mich.) and Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyThe Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue Progressives zero in on another House chairman in primary Ocasio-Cortez pitches interns to work for her instead of McConnell MORE (Mass.), the president said they should "go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came."  

All four have been outspoken critics of the Trump administration, and Omar and Tlaib in particular have questioned the relationship between the U.S. and Israel, prompting pushback from Republicans. All four are U.S. citizens, and only Omar was born outside the U.S.
 
Trump doubled down on his comments Monday during an event at the White House, denying that he was being racist and expressing no remorse when told that white nationalist groups found common cause with his message.

“It doesn’t concern me because many people agree with me,” Trump told reporters on the South Lawn of the White House during an event designed to highlight American manufacturing.
 
Republicans have largely remained silent about Trump's comments, which initially took place when they were scattered across the country over the weekend. 
 
 
"I’m going to be taking questions tomorrow after lunch at the stakeout. I’d be happy to respond then," he told a group of reporters. 
 
Some Senate Republicans, however, have spoken out. Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Stagwell President Mark Penn says Trump is losing on fighting the virus; Fauci says U.S. 'going in the wrong direction' in fight against virus GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday Senate passes extension of application deadline for PPP small-business loans MORE (R-Maine) said Trump should delete his tweet, which she characterized as "way over the line." Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenators will have access to intelligence on Russian bounties on US troops Overnight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police Senators push to limit transfer of military-grade equipment to police MORE (R-Alaska) said that "there is no excuse for the president's spiteful comments." 
 
“Instead of sharing how the Democratic Party’s far-left, pro-socialist policies — not to mention the hateful language some of their members have used towards law enforcement and Jews — are wrong for the future of our nation, the President interjected with unacceptable personal attacks and racially offensive language,” Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottSenators push foreign media to disclose if they are registered as foreign agents The Memo: Trump grows weak as clock ticks down GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday MORE (S.C.), the only black Republican senator, said in a statement.

Schumer said he will follow in the footsteps of Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiMilitary bases should not be renamed, we must move forward in the spirit of reconciliation Pelosi: Trump 'himself is a hoax' Women must continue to persist to rise as political leaders of America MORE (D-Calif.), who plans to introduce a House resolution condemning Trump's tweets, and he urged Republicans to support it.

"Speaker Pelosi has said that the House will introduce a resolution denouncing the president's comments. Our intention is to do the same in the Senate. We'll see. We'll see just how many Republicans will sign on," he said.