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Sarah Jessica Parker on supporting 2024 Biden run: ‘We’ll see’

She rooted him on in 2020, but Sarah Jessica Parker isn’t explicitly throwing her support behind President Biden if he makes a 2024 reelection bid.

“I would like to think that he feels good enough and well enough, and we’ll see, right?” the “And Just Like That” star told ITK when asked whether she’d back Biden in the next election if he undertakes another White House bid.

Pausing before answering the question, Parker replied “yes” after her husband, Matthew Broderick, chimed in for her in the affirmative.

Biden, 79, has said that he plans to run for reelection, assuming that he’s “in good health.”

“I’m hoping that we can do better by a lot of people,” Parker, 57, continued in her response about potentially supporting Biden again.

“There’s a lot of working mothers and working parents that are really — we haven’t done right by them yet. And I know that is our aim,” she said.

Parker helped launch the “Moms for Biden” initiative in Ohio during Biden’s 2020 run. A longtime Democratic supporter, she also was named to the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities by former President Obama.

“It’s complicated to try to get things done,” Parker said while appearing in Washington on Monday.

“There’s machinery in place that doesn’t allow necessarily for things to get passed. I think that’s the thing that is frustrating for a lot of Americans,” Parker said, noting Democrats’ stalled $2 trillion tax-and-spending bill. 

“Build Back Better. Yeah, that was frustrating,” she sighed.

“I’m simply a voter,” Parker said as her representative pulled her away to pose for photographs on the red carpet, “who sees — we all see — you gotta do better.”

“It’s not necessarily all about him — it’s about how we get things done,” she concluded.

Parker later approached ITK saying she hoped to have more time to expand on her thoughts at some point in the future. We checked, but haven’t heard back.

The Emmy Award winner and Broderick, who star together in the Broadway revival of “Plaza Suite,” both touched down in the nation’s capital this week to welcome a collection of Neil Simon manuscripts and papers to the Library of Congress.

“I’m so glad that this is where it’s going,” Broderick, 60, told ITK about the 7,700 items donated to the library.

“What better place? He’s part of American history,” Broderick said of Simon, who died in 2018 at age 91. 

The couple appeared after testing positive for COVID-19 earlier this month, forcing performances of “Plaza Suite” to be canceled. 

“It was very poor timing on our part,” Parker quipped, while saying she still suffered from “little lingering things, like millions of other people.”

“We had managed to avoid it for 25 months, and I feel like I worked on so many film sets. I was working for 16 months straight in states that had the highest [cases] — they were like on fire red, and yet I didn’t [catch it],” she said. “I think we just felt gutted missing shows, frankly, not so much for health.”

Several lawmakers — along with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden, Simon’s widow Elaine Joyce, “Plaza Suite” director John Benjamin Hickey and Library of Congress James Madison Council chairman David Rubenstein — were on-hand to get a first glimpse at the famed New York-born playwright’s materials, photographs, personal notebooks filled with handwritten scrawl, memorabilia and more.

Senate hopeful Rep. Billy Long (R-Mo.) told ITK he was a Simon fan, as he snapped a photo on his phone of the Pulitzer Prize winner’s glasses. Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.) was eyed looking at Simon’s drafts for his 2000 play, “The Dinner Party.”

“Neil Simon’s work has left and undeniable mark on American culture and theater,” Hayden said in a statement about the collection. “The donation of Simon’s papers to our nation’s library is a treasured addition to our holdings that enhances our performing arts collection as one of the best in the world. It also ensures Simon’s legacy is preserved for generations to come.”

Tags Biden Billy Long Sarah Jessica Parker

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