Lawmakers, media serve up laughs at annual 'Will on the Hill'

Big names from Capitol Hill, the media world and the stage gathered Monday night for the Shakespeare Theatre Company's annual performance of "Will on the Hill."

D.C. notables put their acting chops on show, delivering laughs and poking fun at the current political scene to raise money for arts education.

This year's performance was entitled "My Kingdom for a Farce," written by Michael Trottier, with help from Jeff Nussbaum, Brian Agler, and Patrick Ross from West Wing Writers. The show mixed Shakespeare and politics through the story of a bumbling campaign manager named Rich.

The event was a bipartisan affair, with playful hits directed at both Republicans and Democrats.

“The name’s Rich. Hi, I’m the campaign manager around here, and like the DCCC, I have no idea what I’m doing!” said actor Ken Clark, a star of numerous professional stage productions, including “Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812” on Broadway.

Rich was one of the many colorful characters in the show, which saw him enlist two allies, "C and T," who represented Shakespeare's most famous comedic and tragic characters. There were bumps on the road for the campaign and while C and T did their best to avoid catastrophe, Rich couldn't hide his complete lack of competence.

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“None of you would leak this soliloquy to The Post, would you?” Clark joked with the audience at one point.

Different Shakespearean characters appeared throughout the performance to deliver punch lines that drew laughs and cheers from the audience.

Sen. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsThe United States broken patent system is getting worse Biden faces scrutiny for his age from other Democrats Democrats press FBI for details on Kavanaugh investigation MORE (D-Del.) played Macbeth and delivered a shot at the Clintons, telling the audience: "My marriage inspired Bill and Hillary.”

One twist involved Rich having to deal with a group of conspiracy theorists jokingly called "the Truthbusters."

Gregory Angelo, president of the Log Cabin Republicans, played Coriolanus from the Shakespearean tragedy, who suggested dealing with the Truthbusters with a trial by combat. Angelo as Coriolanus said the team needed to "make stabbing great again," and donned a plain red baseball cap for the rest of the show.

Of course, the night would not have been complete without praise for the Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals.

“I mean, you can still battle knights — just last Thursday we obliterated some knights from Las Vegas,” said "T," played by Shakespeare Theatre Company actress Victoria Frings, drawing loud cheers from the audience.

And the laughs paid off, with the Shakespeare Theatre Company raising $500,000.

The Hill was a media sponsor for the annual event, which also saw Editor in Chief Bob Cusack take the stage, teamed up with Rep. Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaThe Hill's Morning Report — US strikes approved against Iran pulled back Darrell Issa eyes return to Congress Trump's 2020 campaign strategy is to be above the law MORE (R-Calif.) as "the investigators."

Other lawmakers performing included Reps. Suzanne BonamiciSuzanne Marie BonamiciHouse lawmakers introduce bill to help those struggling with student debt Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Lawmakers put spotlight on youth homelessness MORE (D-Ore.), Brendan Boyle (D-Pa.) and Gerry ConnollyGerald (Gerry) Edward ConnollyHistory in the House: Congress weathers unprecedented week Democrat grills DHS chief over viral image of drowned migrant and child Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers struggle to understand Facebook's Libra project | EU hits Amazon with antitrust probe | New cybersecurity concerns over census | Robocall, election security bills head to House floor | Privacy questions over FaceApp MORE (D-Va.), as well as former Reps. Jeff MillerJefferson (Jeff) Bingham MillerIf Trump wants to stay popular among veterans he has to do more An effective public service announcement can prevent vet suicides Empower the VA with the tools to help our veterans MORE (R-Fla.) and Jim MoranJames (Jim) Patrick MoranStar-studded cast to perform play based on Mueller report DC theatre to host 11-hour reading of the Mueller report Bottom line MORE (D-Va.). Also featured were Del. Eleanor Holmes NortonEleanor Holmes NortonHouse Democrat offers bill to let students with pot conviction retain federal aid Majority of Americans opposes DC statehood: poll DC statehood hearing rescheduled to make room for Mueller testimony MORE (D-D.C.) and Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerWill Congress act to stop robocalls? Hillicon Valley: Trump reportedly weighing executive action on alleged tech bias | WH to convene summit on online extremism | Federal agencies banned from buying Huawei equipment | Lawmakers jump start privacy talks The Hill's Morning Report - How will Trump be received in Dayton and El Paso? MORE (R-Miss).

Other stars on stage included Ryan ZinkeRyan Keith ZinkeBLM issues final plan for reduced Utah monument New policy at Interior's in-house watchdog clamps down on interactions with press Overnight Energy: EPA proposes scrapping limits on coal plant waste | Appointee overseeing federal lands once advocated selling them | EPA lifts Obama-era block on controversial mine MORE, who is Interior secretary, D.C. Councilmember At-Large Robert C. White, Jr., Marla Allard, the host of public television's "Relatively Speaking," CNN chief political correspondent Dana Bash, Overseas Private Investment Corporation CEO David Bohigian, CEO of Christie Strategies Ron Christie, editor at large of The Atlantic Steve Clemons, performer Maggie Coons, John Feehery of EFB Advocacy, "West Wing" actress Melissa Fitzgerald, President of Americans for Tax Reform Grover Norquist, Deputy Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Small Business Christina Sevilla, Deputy Managing Editor at The Weekly Standard Kelly Jane Torrance and actor Heath Saunders.

This story was corrected on June 14 at 2:07 p.m.