Michelle Obama: America under Trump like 'living with a divorced dad' for the weekend
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Former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaTrump to counter DNC with travel to swing states Biden strikes out with Harris, the least-worst of his choices Biden, Harris to address Democratic convention from Chase Center in Delaware MORE compared life in America under President TrumpDonald John TrumpUPS, FedEx shut down calls to handle mail-in ballots, warn of 'significant' problems: report Controversial GOP Georgia candidate attempts to distance from QAnon Trump orders TikTok parent company to sell US assets within 90 days MORE to living with a “divorced dad,” according to The Independent.

“For anyone who had any problems with Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaMcGrath reshuffles campaign in home stretch to Senate election The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump hedges with Post Office funding | Harris speaks with 19th | An apology of sorts in Massachusetts Jared Kushner denies Trump 'promoting' questions about Kamala Harris MORE, let’s just think about what we were troubled by – there were never any indictments,” she said during an interview with late-night host Stephen ColbertStephen Tyrone ColbertThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Mnuchin previews GOP coronavirus relief package GOP official says Elizabeth Warren 'endorses voter fraud' after joke about Bailey voting for Biden Bolton book sells 780,000 copies in first week, set to surpass 1M copies printed MORE in London while promoting her memoir “Becoming,” according to the publication.

She then joked that the U.S. under Trump's presidency was akin to a teenager.

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“We come from a broken family, we are a little unsettled,” Obama said. “Sometimes you spend the weekend with divorced dad. That feels like fun but then you get sick. That is what America is going through. We are living with divorced dad.”

Obama added that she recently she has struggled to watch the news and has had to learn to pace herself.

“When I am not emotionally able to deal with it I turn it off for a moment,” she told Colbert. “I only let some of that stuff into my world when I’m ready. You can’t have a steady diet of fear and frustration coming in.”

Obama said she believed the United States had overcome worse challenges than the ones it currently faces.

“We have always come out at the other end – better and stronger. We are moving in a direction of diversity and inclusion,” she said. “No one ever said it would be easy. We are just in the throes of the uneasy path of change.”

“Becoming,” Obama’s memoir, had sold nearly 10 million copies worldwide since its publication in November. Thomas Rabe, CEO for Bertelsmann, which co-owns the book’s publisher, Penguin Random House, said it “could be the most successful memoir in history.”