Michelle Obama: America under Trump like 'living with a divorced dad' for the weekend
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Former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaBudowsky: A Biden-Michelle Obama ticket in 2020? Bloomberg threatens to shake up 2020 primary The Hill's Campaign Report: Bloomberg looks to upend Democratic race MORE compared life in America under President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP senators balk at lengthy impeachment trial Warren goes local in race to build 2020 movement 2020 Democrats make play for veterans' votes MORE to living with a “divorced dad,” according to The Independent.

“For anyone who had any problems with Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaThe Memo: Democrats confront prospect of long primary George Conway: 'If Barack Obama had done this' Republicans would be 'out for blood' George Conway to take part in MSNBC impeachment hearing coverage MORE, let’s just think about what we were troubled by – there were never any indictments,” she said during an interview with late-night host Stephen ColbertStephen Tyrone ColbertHelen Mirren, Ian McKellen act out Trump Ukraine call in Colbert appearance Klobuchar to Colbert: We're going 'to build a blue wall' in PA, WI, MI and 'make Trump pay for it' Sherrod Brown: GOP colleagues privately acknowledge Trump is racist, misogynist MORE in London while promoting her memoir “Becoming,” according to the publication.

She then joked that the U.S. under Trump's presidency was akin to a teenager.

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“We come from a broken family, we are a little unsettled,” Obama said. “Sometimes you spend the weekend with divorced dad. That feels like fun but then you get sick. That is what America is going through. We are living with divorced dad.”

Obama added that she recently she has struggled to watch the news and has had to learn to pace herself.

“When I am not emotionally able to deal with it I turn it off for a moment,” she told Colbert. “I only let some of that stuff into my world when I’m ready. You can’t have a steady diet of fear and frustration coming in.”

Obama said she believed the United States had overcome worse challenges than the ones it currently faces.

“We have always come out at the other end – better and stronger. We are moving in a direction of diversity and inclusion,” she said. “No one ever said it would be easy. We are just in the throes of the uneasy path of change.”

“Becoming,” Obama’s memoir, had sold nearly 10 million copies worldwide since its publication in November. Thomas Rabe, CEO for Bertelsmann, which co-owns the book’s publisher, Penguin Random House, said it “could be the most successful memoir in history.”