Michelle Obama: America under Trump like 'living with a divorced dad' for the weekend
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Former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaObamas reportedly buying Martha's Vineyard mansion The Hill's Morning Report - Trump touts new immigration policy, backtracks on tax cuts Obama explains decision to get into movie business: 'We all have a sacred story' MORE compared life in America under President TrumpDonald John TrumpDavid Axelrod after Ginsburg cancer treatment: Supreme Court vacancy could 'tear this country apart' EU says it will 'respond in kind' if US slaps tariffs on France Ginsburg again leaves Supreme Court with an uncertain future MORE to living with a “divorced dad,” according to The Independent.

“For anyone who had any problems with Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaTrump on his 'chosen one' remark: 'It was sarcasm' Kentucky basketball coach praises Obama after golf round: 'He is a really serious golfer' Biden evokes 1968, asks voters to imagine if Obama had been assassinated MORE, let’s just think about what we were troubled by – there were never any indictments,” she said during an interview with late-night host Stephen ColbertStephen Tyrone ColbertF-bombs away: Why lawmakers are cursing now more than ever Stephen Colbert on Trump: 'He's trying to invite us into this madness' Biden's personal grief comes to forefront amid mass shootings MORE in London while promoting her memoir “Becoming,” according to the publication.

She then joked that the U.S. under Trump's presidency was akin to a teenager.

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“We come from a broken family, we are a little unsettled,” Obama said. “Sometimes you spend the weekend with divorced dad. That feels like fun but then you get sick. That is what America is going through. We are living with divorced dad.”

Obama added that she recently she has struggled to watch the news and has had to learn to pace herself.

“When I am not emotionally able to deal with it I turn it off for a moment,” she told Colbert. “I only let some of that stuff into my world when I’m ready. You can’t have a steady diet of fear and frustration coming in.”

Obama said she believed the United States had overcome worse challenges than the ones it currently faces.

“We have always come out at the other end – better and stronger. We are moving in a direction of diversity and inclusion,” she said. “No one ever said it would be easy. We are just in the throes of the uneasy path of change.”

“Becoming,” Obama’s memoir, had sold nearly 10 million copies worldwide since its publication in November. Thomas Rabe, CEO for Bertelsmann, which co-owns the book’s publisher, Penguin Random House, said it “could be the most successful memoir in history.”