Funny Or Die is targeting Senate Republicans over their quick opposition to the Iran nuclear agreement, referring to the lawmakers as "the dealbreakers."  
 
The comedy website paired up with New Security Action, a progressive outside group, to parody lawmakers in its latest video, as the Senate prepares to battle over a long-term agreement reached Tuesday on Iran's nuclear program. 
 
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The video shows a negotiator from the United States and Iran reaching a deal before a group of older men, who are supposed to represent those who oppose the deal in the Senate, show up and begin to shoot, tear apart, and throw a grenade on the paperwork. 
 
"They're too old to fight a war, but that won't stop these brave U.S. senators from trying to start one with Iran," the video's narrator says. 
 
The parody video also compares the quick pushback against the Iran nuclear deal to Congress's vote to go to war with Iraq. 
 
"Last time they started a war in Iraq because of weapons of mass destruction, this time it's pretty much the same thing, but with Iran, so it's totally different," the narrator adds.
 
New Security Action said the video will be "distributed widely" through a digital ad campaign. The group has also launched a website asking Americans to tell Congress to back the Iran deal, which has garnered more than 100,00 signatures. 
 
Stephen Miles, the director of operations for New Security Action, said, in a statement, that the "very same folks who brought us the Iraq War now want to kill a negotiated deal and put us on a path to war with Iran. It’s up to those who think that this is a particularly bad idea to make their voices heard.” 
 
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHawley warns Schumer to steer clear of Catholic-based criticisms of Barrett Senate GOP set to vote on Trump's Supreme Court pick before election Harris slams Trump's Supreme Court pick as an attempt to 'destroy the Affordable Care Act' MORE (R-Ky.) rejected that logic on Tuesday, saying it is "not the time for more tired, obviously untrue talking points about the choice here being between a bad deal and war."
 
"No serious person would believe that’s true. Even the people saying these things have to know they’re not true — and they probably know that the very opposite is in fact more likely. So the country doesn’t have time to waste on more White House messaging exercises when the seriousness of the moment calls for intellectually honest debate," he added.