Pamela Anderson, Mary Matalin to co-host PETA inaugural ball
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An unlikely duo is teaming up for an inaugural ball honoring congressional lawmakers: “Baywatch” alum Pamela Anderson and conservative political strategist Mary Matalin.

The pair is poised to co-host a bash on the eve of President-elect Donald TrumpDonald TrumpUkraine's president compares UN to 'a retired superhero' Collins to endorse LePage in Maine governor comeback bid Heller won't say if Biden won election MORE’s inauguration, held by the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). The “Animals’ Party” inaugural bash will “celebrate members of Congress involved in animal protection,” according to a Thursday news release from the animal rights group.

Democratic Reps. Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson LeeBlack Caucus meets with White House over treatment of Haitian migrants Angelina Jolie spotted in Capitol meeting with senators Elon Musk after Texas Gov. Abbott invokes him: 'I would prefer to stay out of politics' MORE (Texas), Dina Titus (Nev.),and Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerProgressives push for fossil subsidy repeal in spending bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - House Democrats plagued by Biden agenda troubles Oregon legislature on the brink as Democrats push gerrymandered maps MORE (Ore.), along with Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-Fla.), are among those being recognized next Thursday in downtown Washington.

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"People say that animals have no voice, but in Washington, PETA depends on the voices of 'elephants,' 'donkeys,' and even those with no party mascot," PETA President Ingrid Newkirk said in a statement.

Matalin — who’s married to Democratic commentator James Carville and who announced last year that she changed her party registration to Libertarian — was an assistant to former President George W. Bush and was former President George H.W. Bush’s campaign director. She was honored as PETA’s “Person of the Year” last year.

Former Playboy model Anderson is a longtime animal rights activist. In 2008, she visited Capitol Hill to lobby lawmakers against animal testing.