Rob Thomas: Anti-Trump celebs have become 'white noise'
© ASCAP Foundation We Write The Songs Event

Rob Thomas says he’s no Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpGeraldo Rivera on Trump sowing election result doubts: 'Enough is enough now' Murkowski: Trump should concede White House race Scott Atlas resigns as coronavirus adviser to Trump MORE supporter, but he’s had enough with Hollywood stars speaking out against the president.

“I’m not a fan of Donald Trump, but I am so tired of hearing celebrities talk about not being a fan of Donald Trump, that it almost seems like white noise,” the Matchbox Twenty frontman said Tuesday. “I think that he’s a man that’s not really equipped for the job, but I think no one really cares what I think about that."

ITK caught up with the Grammy winner at the American Society for Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) Foundation’s “We Write the Songs” event at the Library of Congress.

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“I have opinions, but my opinions are as a 45-year-old husband, father, taxpayer. No matter what I say, they always kind of come across as a guy who sings music and it’s always, ‘Well you need to shut up!’” the “Lonely No More” singer exclaimed.

“I think that there is a huge part of his base that thinks he’s killing it right now,” Thomas added of Trump, “and it’s really hard to speak against that because somewhere somebody thinks he’s right. Not me.”

The ninth annual “We Write the Songs” concert precedes a Wednesday push by ASCAP to urge lawmakers to update music licensing laws.

“They just told me today that on Pandora, ‘Smooth’ was 24 million streams. And I split that with another writer. I made a whopping $600 on that,” Thomas said, referring to his 1999 hit with Santana.

“I’m fortunate, I made money. But if you don’t have another income stream, and if you’re just starting out… you can have one of the biggest songs in the world, and not be able to make your car payment,” said Thomas.

A sea of lawmakers was on hand to watch Thomas and other performers, including Peter Frampton and Gordon Kennedy, take the stage.

Among those eyed at the music bash: Reps. Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.), Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), Blake FarentholdRandolph (Blake) Blake FarentholdThe biggest political upsets of the decade Members spar over sexual harassment training deadline Female Dems see double standard in Klobuchar accusations MORE (R-Texas), Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), Billy Long (R-Mo.), Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteBottom line No documents? Hoping for legalization? Be wary of Joe Biden Press: Trump's final presidential pardon: himself MORE (R-Va.), Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), Brett GuthrieSteven (Brett) Brett GuthrieHillicon Valley: Zuckerberg and Dorsey return for another hearing | House passes 5G funding bill | Twitter introduces 'fleets' House approves legislation providing 0 million to boost US 5G efforts Ensuring more Americans have access to 5G technology MORE (R-Ky.), Lamar Smith (R-Texas), Greg Meeks (D-N.Y.), Judy Chu (D-Calif.), Patrick Meehan (R-Pa.), Martha RobyMartha Dubina RobyThe year of the Republican woman Barry Moore wins Alabama GOP runoff to replace Martha Roby The 14 other key races to watch on Super Tuesday MORE (R-Ala.), Raúl Labrador (R-Idaho), Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnTime to bring federal employees home for every holiday Sunday shows preview: Biden transition, COVID-19 spike in spotlight Senate GOP to drop documentary series days before election hitting China, Democrats over coronavirus MORE (R-Tenn.), Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.), Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) and Ron DeSantis (R-Fla.), House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) and Sens. Dick DurbinDick DurbinOvernight Health Care: Moderna to apply for emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine candidate | Hospitals brace for COVID-19 surge | US more than doubles highest number of monthly COVID-19 cases Bipartisan Senate group holding coronavirus relief talks amid stalemate The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - COVID-19 fears surround Thanksgiving holiday MORE (D-Ill.) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerGOP lawmaker patience runs thin with Trump tactics Republicans start turning the page on Trump era The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump, Biden blitz battleground states MORE (R-Miss.).

Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoGraham: Trump should attend Biden inauguration 'if' Biden wins As Biden administration ramps up, Trump legal effort drags on The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump holds his last turkey pardon ceremony MORE (R-W.Va.) shared a laugh with Thomas as the pair chatted it up at a reception prior to the concert.

Rep. Doug Collins introduced Rob Hyman and Eric Bazilian, of The Hooters.

“Tonight is about how music makes us feel. The Hooters may have started in 1971, but I found them in 1986!” the Georgia Republican told the crowd as he proudly held up a cassette tape.

Rep. Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertCapitol's COVID-19 spike could be bad Thanksgiving preview GOP Rep. Dan Newhouse tests positive for COVID-19 Colorado Democrat Ed Perlmutter tests positive for coronavirus MORE (R-Texas) was seen chatting up legendary producer Jimmy Jam as audience members poured into the Library of Congress’s Coolidge Auditorium ahead of the concert.