Rob Thomas: Anti-Trump celebs have become 'white noise'
© ASCAP Foundation We Write The Songs Event

Rob Thomas says he’s no Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump directed Cohen to lie to Congress about plans to build Trump Tower in Moscow during 2016 campaign: report DC train system losing 0k per day during government shutdown Senate Republicans eye rules change to speed Trump nominees MORE supporter, but he’s had enough with Hollywood stars speaking out against the president.

“I’m not a fan of Donald Trump, but I am so tired of hearing celebrities talk about not being a fan of Donald Trump, that it almost seems like white noise,” the Matchbox Twenty frontman said Tuesday. “I think that he’s a man that’s not really equipped for the job, but I think no one really cares what I think about that."

ITK caught up with the Grammy winner at the American Society for Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) Foundation’s “We Write the Songs” event at the Library of Congress.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I have opinions, but my opinions are as a 45-year-old husband, father, taxpayer. No matter what I say, they always kind of come across as a guy who sings music and it’s always, ‘Well you need to shut up!’” the “Lonely No More” singer exclaimed.

“I think that there is a huge part of his base that thinks he’s killing it right now,” Thomas added of Trump, “and it’s really hard to speak against that because somewhere somebody thinks he’s right. Not me.”

The ninth annual “We Write the Songs” concert precedes a Wednesday push by ASCAP to urge lawmakers to update music licensing laws.

“They just told me today that on Pandora, ‘Smooth’ was 24 million streams. And I split that with another writer. I made a whopping $600 on that,” Thomas said, referring to his 1999 hit with Santana.

“I’m fortunate, I made money. But if you don’t have another income stream, and if you’re just starting out… you can have one of the biggest songs in the world, and not be able to make your car payment,” said Thomas.

A sea of lawmakers was on hand to watch Thomas and other performers, including Peter Frampton and Gordon Kennedy, take the stage.

Among those eyed at the music bash: Reps. Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.), Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), Blake FarentholdRandolph (Blake) Blake FarentholdFormer Texas lawmaker Blake Farenthold resigns from lobbying job Congress sends bill overhauling sexual harassment policy to Trump's desk Senate approves bill reforming Congress's sexual harassment policy MORE (R-Texas), Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), Billy Long (R-Mo.), Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteHouse GOP probe into FBI, DOJ comes to an end Murkowski to reintroduce bill to help abused Native American women FBI hits GOP chairman over push to clear sensitive transcripts by Christmas Eve MORE (R-Va.), Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), Brett GuthrieSteven (Brett) Brett GuthrieDemocrats will push to retake vote on funding government after chaos on the floor Hillicon Valley: Republicans demand answers from mobile carriers on data practices | Top carriers to stop selling location data | DOJ probing Huawei | T-Mobile execs stayed at Trump hotel as merger awaited approval House Republicans question mobile carriers on data practices MORE (R-Ky.), Lamar Smith (R-Texas), Greg Meeks (D-N.Y.), Judy Chu (D-Calif.), Patrick Meehan (R-Pa.), Martha RobyMartha Dubina RobyOcasio-Cortez: 'I was stopped because it was assumed I was an intern' Insurgency shakes up Democratic establishment Dem House candidate claims Russians tried to hack campaign website MORE (R-Ala.), Raúl Labrador (R-Idaho), Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnBarr hearing marks first time Senate Judiciary has GOP women serving on panel Live coverage: Trump AG pick grilled on Mueller probe at confirmation hearing Overnight Defense: Appeals court sides with Trump on transgender military ban | Trump threatens years-long shutdown | Trump floats declaring national emergency to build wall with military MORE (R-Tenn.), Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.), Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) and Ron DeSantis (R-Fla.), House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) and Sens. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinTrump AG pick: I won't be 'bullied' by anyone, including the president Live coverage: Trump AG pick grilled on Mueller probe at confirmation hearing Senate Dems set to take aim at new Trump attorney general pick MORE (D-Ill.) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerOvernight Health Care: Dem chair plans hearing on Medicare for all | Senate GOP talks drug prices with Trump health chief | PhRMA CEO hopeful Trump reverses course on controversial pricing proposal Mobile providers at center of privacy storm The Memo: Trump moves to brink of emergency declaration MORE (R-Miss.).

Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoOvernight Energy: Wheeler weathers climate criticism at confirmation hearing | Dems want Interior to stop drilling work during shutdown | 2018 was hottest year for oceans Dems blast EPA nominee at confirmation hearing Republican senators skeptical of using national emergency for wall funding MORE (R-W.Va.) shared a laugh with Thomas as the pair chatted it up at a reception prior to the concert.

Rep. Doug Collins introduced Rob Hyman and Eric Bazilian, of The Hooters.

“Tonight is about how music makes us feel. The Hooters may have started in 1971, but I found them in 1986!” the Georgia Republican told the crowd as he proudly held up a cassette tape.

Rep. Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertThe Memo: Trump veers between hard-liner, dealmaker on shutdown Gohmert to 'Fox & Friends': Extend shutdown for wall 'until hell freezes over' DHS secretary: Mary and Joseph would have been eligible for asylum MORE (R-Texas) was seen chatting up legendary producer Jimmy Jam as audience members poured into the Library of Congress’s Coolidge Auditorium ahead of the concert.